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WWIIBuff1945

Bring back Radom with sweetheart grips.

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I have an opportunity to purchase this from the family of the vet. What would be a fair offer? There are no capture papers only the Michigan gun registration papers. I think that devalues the rig somewhat.

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it doesn't de-value nothing. it is still a vet bring back. if you need a permit to own, then fine. if I may say-------- every one is hung up on a name on the items they want to buy. to me its bull. a lot of vet owned items were not named or ASN'ED so does it mean its worth less??????????


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I see what you are saying but additional provenance such as the capture adds value in my opinion. As many people have said buy the gun not the story. In the case of capture papers, it at least ties the weapon to a certain place and time!! Not all will agree and say papers add nothing but not to many who collect bring backs.

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if I was looking at two identical guns, one with capture papers and one without I would want the one with papers but it doesn't add a whole lot of value to me. as far as the radom here I think whatever you think you are losing with no capture papers you are gaining with the grips and you can probably still find out about the vet and who the peaple in the pictures are with the registration papers. I bought a radom about ten years ago so I don't know what they go for now but that one would be a nice one to have. 


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Papers are nice but often lost or at times never issued.I knew a 17th Airborne vet who took a PPK out of a house in Germany.He resisted sending it home via mail as he knew it would be stolen.He shipped the box and manual home that he took but carried the pistol with him til wars end. He didnt want to get it papered as he figured some officer would take it. He stated when on ship off the US coast a day or so an annoucement was made to "dispose of any contraband" or unauthorized items. He saw many GIs throw items over board. He said they were told they would be searched when disembarking once in port. He didn't want to give up the pistol.He came up with an idea. He had made friends with a sailor who worked in the ships machine shop. He often would spend time in the machine shop. He took a hack saw and cut the bottom off the canteen he had. Wrapped the pistol in GI wool socks so it would rattle in the canteen. He placed the cup over the bottom open end of the canteen and then put it back in the canteen cover.He placed this in his awol bag and waited to leave the ship.The announcement was made again just off shore.More GIs dumped stuff over the side. They docked and when leaving the ship he said no ones bags were checked or questioned. He said it would have taken days to do so.Needless to say many GIs were not pleased.

 

As per value I guess its what one feels its worth. A Radom thats slotted for a shoulder stock can bring a fair bit more than a non slotted. This one may be a very late war production which collectors chase hard these days paper or no paper. This is not a 3 lever. Would be best to research the block code on it as well as the Waffenant etc. Matching numbered mag? if so added value regardless of paper. Phospate finnish..more value.You have a period made shoulder holster typical of what I call a "cigarette" holster.GIs loved shoulder holsters and it was common to source a German cobbler or leather worker to make a holster and trade "cigarettes' for them etc. The Germans were destitute and made item's to fill the needs of GIs and generate any income or items of value as they had nothing. You have the owners name on the permit and coming from the family you can easily determine his unit with a little research or asking the family.Even get a photo if possible (or copy) of the vet. Looks like a nice rig to me.


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The registration paperwork looks like it gives you a lead on the owner- and maybe the original owner too.  Capture papers may add value, but being registered doesn’t de-value.  Guns have value in and of themselves and are relatively easy to sell, story or no story.  

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Thanks for the comments guys! A little update on the gun... my friend spoke to the widow and offered my starting price of 1K. She didn't say yes or no but added that she now has to run it by other family members. She said there may be some other papers related to the vet laying around. She had no idea what unit he was in during the war. The vet has a common name and when I searched the National Archives there were 30 or so vets listed and unfortunately none had his birthday. If I do end up with it, I will ask Matt if he can help research the vet.

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11 minutes ago, Doctorofwar said:

The registration paperwork looks like it gives you a lead on the owner- and maybe the original owner too.  Capture papers may add value, but being registered doesn’t de-value.  Guns have value in and of themselves and are relatively easy to sell, story or no story.  

What I should have said was that it doesn't increase the value like capture papers would. The original owner of the Radom is the current sellers father-in-law. Her husband, the vets son, was a navy seal in Nam and recently passed. I don't know when his father died but he was born in 1913 so I assume it was many years ago.

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7 hours ago, doyler said:

Papers are nice but often lost or at times never issued.I knew a 17th Airborne vet who took a PPK out of a house in Germany.He resisted sending it home via mail as he knew it would be stolen.He shipped the box and manual home that he took but carried the pistol with him til wars end. He didnt want to get it papered as he figured some officer would take it. He stated when on ship off the US coast a day or so an annoucement was made to "dispose of any contraband" or unauthorized items. He saw many GIs throw items over board. He said they were told they would be searched when disembarking once in port. He didn't want to give up the pistol.He came up with an idea. He had made friends with a sailor who worked in the ships machine shop. He often would spend time in the machine shop. He took a hack saw and cut the bottom off the canteen he had. Wrapped the pistol in GI wool socks so it would rattle in the canteen. He placed the cup over the bottom open end of the canteen and then put it back in the canteen cover.He placed this in his awol bag and waited to leave the ship.The announcement was made again just off shore.More GIs dumped stuff over the side. They docked and when leaving the ship he said no ones bags were checked or questioned. He said it would have taken days to do so.Needless to say many GIs were not pleased.

 

As per value I guess its what one feels its worth. A Radom thats slotted for a shoulder stock can bring a fair bit more than a non slotted. This one may be a very late war production which collectors chase hard these days paper or no paper. This is not a 3 lever. Would be best to research the block code on it as well as the Waffenant etc. Matching numbered mag? if so added value regardless of paper. Phospate finnish..more value.You have a period made shoulder holster typical of what I call a "cigarette" holster.GIs loved shoulder holsters and it was common to source a German cobbler or leather worker to make a holster and trade "cigarettes' for them etc. The Germans were destitute and made item's to fill the needs of GIs and generate any income or items of value as they had nothing. You have the owners name on the permit and coming from the family you can easily determine his unit with a little research or asking the family.Even get a photo if possible (or copy) of the vet. Looks like a nice rig to me.

Doyler I agree that may bring backs came home without filling out the paperwork. I don't believe this has the phosphate finish and I know its the correct mag. I wasn't aware they can have matched mags? I will check my book on Radoms for that.

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54 minutes ago, Cpl. Punishment said:

Best of luck! I have been after one of these a long time

Thanks hopefully I will hear something soon on my offer.

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Well I received some good news yesterday. The lady accepted my second offer of $1200 and I will be getting it this week. I'm happy to add it to my collection. When I initially searched the National Archives I couldn't find any info on the vet but Matt (AZNATION) found some interesting info. It turns out he was an officer in the Mediterranean Theater what unit we don't know yet. He was also wounded in action. I'm still hoping the family can provide some of his military records. I'll post some more pics this week.

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