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Old Crow 1986

"...the fate of generations to come..."

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"If one day can be said to have determined the fate of generations to come, that day was June 6, 1944." - Prime Minister Theresa May, 6 June 2019

 

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(Department of Defense Photo - Public Domian)

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"Your task will not be an easy one.  Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened.  He will fight savagely." - General Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, 5 June 1944

 

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“I know of no better spot to die. We stay.”  - Lieutenant John “Red Dog” Dolan, 82nd Airborne Division, 7 June 1944

 

"The mortal ferocity of the four-day battle for control of the small stone bridge over the Merderet River at La Fière in Normandy is testament to the bridge’s strategic importance in the D-Day invasion of June 1944. Without control of the bridge and its vital causeway, American forces coming from Utah Beach would not have been able to force their way inland.  Fought largely by paratroopers and glidermen from the 82nd Airborne Division, the battle to secure the bridge at La Fière is described as “probably the bloodiest small unit struggle in the experience of American arms.” Victory at La Fière cost more than 250 American lives."  

 

At the peak of fighting there on D+1, a runner was sent to the front lines to check the company’s status and report back. He was told that “A” Company of the 505th was low on men and ammunition and in danger of being overrun. The runner took the message to Lieutenant John “Red Dog” Dolan, who in turn scribbled a note on a small piece of paper and ordered the runner to take it back to Sergeant Billy Owen. The note read, “I know of no better spot to die. We stay.” (Text from the Natioanl World War II Museum website)

 

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"The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machineguns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After 2 days of fighting, only 90 could still bear arms.

Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war."

- Ronald Reagan, 6 June 1984

 

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"There are two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are dead and those who are going to die. Now let’s get the hell out of here." - Colonel George A. Taylor, Commander, 16th Infantry Regiment, Ist Infantry Division, Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944

 

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“We’ll start the war from right here!”

Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt Jr., Commander, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Utah Beach, 6 June 1944

 

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“On behalf of France, I bow down before their bravery”...“We know what we owe to you veterans: our freedom. On behalf of my nation I just want to say: thank you.”

- Emmanuel Macron, President of France, 6 June 2019

 

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Throughout Normandy the French have posted individual tribute banners with the names and likenesses of Allied soldiers.  The banners honor those who fought to free France - those who died here, those who lived through the battle, those who distinguished themselves and those whose contributions were less notable.  The banners are everywhere.  Not just clustered at specific sites or in towns.  They are posted on lanes, in towns, near museums, walking paths...if there is a post, a streetlight or a utility pole, it has a tribute banner.  Every single banner pays tribute to an individual soldier, sailor, or airman.  No duplications.  The French honor - with boundless graciousness - the individual struggle and sacrifice of those who fought here.  Very classy move. 

 

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Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,

But he’ll remember with advantages

What feats he did that day: then shall our names.

Familiar in his mouth as household words

Be in their flowing cups freshly remember’d.

This story shall the good man teach his son;

From this day to the ending of the world,

But we in it shall be remember’d;

- Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3

 

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Thank you for sharing! this is a fabulous thread for today!


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If you ever want a custom hand-embroidered (no machine) patch, I'm open to commissions! Pay or trade!
***********************
For an idea of my military collecting interests and wish list, see my profile page!
Looking for Old-Style US Coast Guard Commendation Medal (w/ or w/o ribbon)!

Oh, tarry and be strong; Tell God in prayer. What is thy hidden grief; Thy secret care.

Yet, if no answer come; Pray on and wait: God's time is always best; Never too late.

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Very nice presentation! We can never forget all of their sacrifices.

 

Frank


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If only this were taught so widely everywhere. Thank God for our veterans and those serving.

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A really nice presentation...thank you for posting!

 

Mike

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Thank you for posting this. It's very moving and a fine reminder.

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