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Hello Everyone,

     I had the opportunity to buy What I thought was a M-1904 McClellan Saddle.  It was very inexpensive in my opinion, (well under $100). It was one of those snap decision type purchases, so I wasn't able to do the research I usually do. I was hoping to restore it to put together a nice display.   When I got home I noticed the placard that was stamped with the seat size was blank, and there are no markings on the saddle tree that I can find. I have read that Argentina had made copies of the M-1904 in the 1960s.  I hope that's not what this is, but if I had to I could re sell it and at least get my money back. I welcome any information that some of the more knowledgeable members may have about it.  

Thanks in Advance,

Vic

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My best advice would be to sell the tree and put $300 to $500 into a complete saddle.  They come up fairly frequently. Do your research on what needs to be on a complete saddle.  You will spend a lot more money trying to find all the straps and parts.  Also, a saddle that has been together for a while looks like it's been together for a while.  It will display much nicer.  A parts saddle will have different shades and condition of the leather.  I'm not saying it can't be done, I'm just saying it's probably not worth the effort.

Without data, your just another person with an opinion...................

 

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I have that same saddle. It's WW1 era. I paid the same amount and started out thinking your same thoughts but have come around to what Japrostak has said. The stamps are on the leather. I forget the exact locations, but they are there. Unless you really like to hunt and have a deep interest in this it will turn into a long term project. I ended up giving my saddle and bags to my sister. Equestrian items are more her area and she has moved forward with it. Good luck! 

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Thank you both for the advice. I think you are right. I’ve been searching for parts and the numbers don’t make sense. For what it takes to restore this one I could buy at least two complete saddles

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Thanks for the offer, but I think I’m going to take a step back from this project until I gain a little more knowledge about it. This was a snap purchase which turned out to be more than I anticipated.

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I want to thank you guys again for the information and feedback about the saddle tree, but I have one more question. What are the two “D” rings for on the front of the tree? Is this actually an artillery saddle?

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Correct, The D rings at the front indicate it is an artillery drivers saddle. Normally, the maker info is stamped into one of the rear panels.

BKW

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Brian, thanks for the information. This is definitely an interesting subject. If anyone can recommend any references on these, I would be grateful. I’ve seen McPheeters book, but at over $400, it was a little cost prohibitive.

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