Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
AKC123

ERDL Jungle Fatigue “Field” Repair?

Recommended Posts

Got this 1969 contract ERDL Jungle Fatigue top a while back. At the time I didn’t really look over it well and didn’t notice that it appears the left sleeve has been completely removed then reattached. The right sleeve is not torn or altered so it doesn’t seem like someone tried to make a vest out of it. But strange that it appears the whole sleeve has been removed cleanly. So what do you guys think? Could this have been done during this top’s service life or does it feel more like bubba’s home tailor service? Also it appears the name Lang is marker written on the inside of the left side just near the edge of where the buttons fasten.

417E16FF-A154-4B27-B3FB-F4086D5026A6.jpeg

83278C1E-AC38-41B8-BE70-2D671350CDE6.jpeg

AD6185A6-232D-42CE-93FC-C930BD7EB8B1.jpeg

A1DF5EF1-4B6D-496E-BDD7-57FCF0AD2A13.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody has ever seen anything like this or has any ideas? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 For me, I have seen more than a few ERDL and RDF uniforms that have been patched up.  I will add some of them have been patched more than a few times.  I imagine your shirt has been repaired by the soldier himself as opposed to it been taken in and having it professionally repaired.


Always looking for US and foreign militaria from the Central American wars circa 1970-1990

donation2017.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, nkomo said:

 For me, I have seen more than a few ERDL and RDF uniforms that have been patched up.  I will add some of them have been patched more than a few times.  I imagine your shirt has been repaired by the soldier himself as opposed to it been taken in and having it professionally repaired.

Thanks for the reply. Yea what I meant was do you think this was done while in service or if maybe someone who wore it after it left the military likely repaired it at home. But it certainly seems to be something done by a soldier to me. Looks like a fairly meticulous job by someone who cared rather then someone who would have picked it up as a cheap shirt to wear for work or something. I appreciate it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I believe when these jackets were surplused, Property Disposal would make repairs  like these so that the items  were suitable  for sale.  I've seen all kind of repairs  and even patched with non matching camo cloth. 


Gil Burket
Omaha, NE
Specializing in Fakes and Reproductions
of the Vietnam War

burkcats@hotmail.com

 

"One is easily fooled by that which one loves."

 

Moliere: Tartuffe

 

donation2017.gif

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, gwb123 said:

Actually, I believe when these jackets were surplused, Property Disposal would make repairs  like these so that the items  were suitable  for sale.  I've seen all kind of repairs  and even patched with non matching camo cloth. 

Interesting. I’m not familiar with working and seeing fabric but it seems an odd way to attach the sleeve. Looks to be fine by hand rather than just a machine stitch that would run in a line along the seam. Which I would guess would make the most sense for someone who was doing many repairs to many different items to surplus out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, you can see where the sleeves were sewn together originally. What you are seeing is the factory zigzag stitching that would have been hidden inside the shirt. Maybe someone was trying to gain a bit more room on a tight fitting shirt? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Spike said:

Actually, you can see where the sleeves were sewn together originally. What you are seeing is the factory zigzag stitching that would have been hidden inside the shirt. Maybe someone was trying to gain a bit more room on a tight fitting shirt? 

I’ll have to turn it inside out and look at the other sleeve when I get home. Strange if that’s the case that it was only done on one sleeve. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Spike said:

Actually, you can see where the sleeves were sewn together originally. What you are seeing is the factory zigzag stitching that would have been hidden inside the shirt. Maybe someone was trying to gain a bit more room on a tight fitting shirt? 

Looks like you are correct. The pattern is simply the stitching from where the folded seam is stitched inside the sleeve. Peculiar. I don’t think this is something that could have been done simply by some force pulling on the sleeve. It seems the stitching must have been deliberately cut. So looks like this actually wasn’t repaired at all. Don’t know why the other sleeve seems unaltered. Here’s a pic of both inside sleeve seams and another pic of the outside of the sleeve in question where you can see the darker green stitching from the strait seam at the bottom. 

9E5AC5A4-55BE-4710-ADE1-5A9AA88AEFC0.jpeg

F228E110-2D02-40CF-A49E-0E1AA3B66C4A.jpeg

A82E66D9-B7E4-4046-9927-A0515F7E8E58.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.