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Helmets in Use - WW2 Era Armor and WW2 M1 Steel Helmet


MWalsh
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USMC_COLLECTOR

Excuse my naiveness, but is that a hawley liner?

27 minutes ago, Blackhat said:

Guadalcanal’42…1BF2E629-D0AE-4B52-ADD0-C104FC80BD5F.jpeg.985e32deb84ab9a80711ba6e042ea7ea.jpeg

 

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11 minutes ago, USMC_COLLECTOR said:

Excuse my naiveness, but is that a hawley liner?

 

It sure is, standard issue to 1st Marine Division in 1942, still very common in 44 and 45. My hunch is that any low pressure liners you see issued to 1MARDIV Marines, it’s a good chance they are “lids” (reinforcements).

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A pair of combat-weary GIs photographed during a break in the bitter fighting for Buna-Gona in New Guinea - 1943.

 

 

 

 

274037638_431678075418457_508833870344606338_n.jpg

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Medics load a wounded paratrooper on a LCVP Utah Beach

 

See a couple of the USN iver smocks and great helmet markings.

 

 

273661444_3140381806177247_522067776782432471_n.jpg

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1 hour ago, GITom1944 said:

9th Army Mechanized cavalrymen, all from Rochester, NY,

 

 

400149.jpg

That GI on the bottom left in the Tanker Helmet, what is he wearing, looks like a Flight suit of some kind.

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GITom1944
8 hours ago, patches said:

That GI on the bottom left in the Tanker Helmet, what is he wearing, looks like a Flight suit of some kind.

I had not noticed, but I think you are right... Wonder what the story behind it is?

 

Tom

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On 2/16/2022 at 6:52 AM, GITom1944 said:

I had not noticed, but I think you are right... Wonder what the story behind it is?

 

Tom

 

 

Thinking a german issue flight suit. Wide collar is in the style used by the Luftwaffe. 

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Pfc. Henry Latanski October 25, 1944 Credited for killing 25 Japanese soldiers in the Pacific during the first major Japanese counter attack on Leyte

 

 

image.png.92b76bc3e45341d6fef4999528a8af7f.png

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After the American victory on Saipan and Tinian, Japanese civilians were held in internment camps. Security was light because water, food, shelter, and medical care was provided in the camps. The photo depicts a marine giving candy to a Japanese child in an internment camp on Tinian, probably around August 1944. In contrast to Japanese internment camps, the civilians gained weight. There were virtually no POWs as the Japanese soldiers refused to surrender.

 

 

 

 

image.png.4b3e4211cb43abd45602d4101bb3a46f.png

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Here an American Marine only a few days after Saipan was secured has made friends with a Japanese boy. The new wire caption read, "American Marines and Infatrymenwho took Saipan extended a rotective hand to the Japanese women sand children left behinf by the Japanese soldiers. A friendly Yank Marine gets a big hick out of giving a little Japanese voy a ride on his shoulders." The photograph was dated July 11, only days after the island was secured. (The date may be when the newspaper received it rather than when the photograph was taken.) One wonders after what the boy was told before the American invasion what was going through his mind.

 

 

 

image.png.8bcbead1b8b617587d1a9a1ccc7fc0b4.png

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34 minutes ago, doyler said:

Here an American Marine only a few days after Saipan was secured has made friends with a Japanese boy. The new wire caption read, "American Marines and Infatrymenwho took Saipan extended a rotective hand to the Japanese women sand children left behinf by the Japanese soldiers. A friendly Yank Marine gets a big hick out of giving a little Japanese voy a ride on his shoulders." The photograph was dated July 11, only days after the island was secured. (The date may be when the newspaper received it rather than when the photograph was taken.) One wonders after what the boy was told before the American invasion what was going through his mind.

 

 

 

image.png.8bcbead1b8b617587d1a9a1ccc7fc0b4.png

My Dad was an Army infantryman who fought on Saipan. He told some sad stories about the civilian population there.  Glad this little boy made it through when so many didn't. Good to see the smile on that solder too.    

 

Mikie

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Survivor (Littlest Survivor). Photo by W. Eugene Smith, 1943
During World War II hundreds of Japanese were under siege on the island of Saipan, and committed mass suicide rather than surrender to the Americans. When US Marines searched the island, in one of the caves was found barely alive child.
 

 

 

image.png.ab65ba523da528151da012010513f995.png

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