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BA-22 Chute Question (F-1B rip cord)


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... both handles actually, can be used in parachute ensembles working w/ ejection seats. Handles' shape in itself, is not strictly related with the matter.

 

Handle of post #17 was perhaps the most used starting about 1956 till very recent times, but 'T' handle is seen here and there as well. B-52 airmen and sometimes F-104, F-101 and F-105 pilots wore parachutes w/ this type of handle, plus (in their case) the mandatory red hook. Beyond the item in itself, all the rest is exactly the same - cable from the manual handle will go over left shoulder and into the backpack, to merge with the other ripcord (into the F-1B and out of it) into the locking cones under the pack rear flap.

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Sorry..the T handle that you have is for non ejection seatuse...we used the BA for SOLL II operations...not when carrying passengers...

The ‘T’ or ‘blast handle’ ripcord is used in different configurations and has not been used in ejection seat aircraft since the 1960’s when it was used in at least the F-105 and F-106. Since then all ejection seat equipped aircraft utilizing the BA-22 use the cloverleaf ripcord handle that you have with your harness. As has been said, you are missing the red anodized snap clip for the zero delay lanyard. You can get a red anodized snap clip from Para-Gear, but they are not cheap. You are fortunate that your ripcord pocket also has the stowage ring sewn on for stowing the snap clip above 10000 feet (I am actually searching for one of those for a restoration I am doing). The ‘T’ or blast handle was (is?) typically used on bailout rigs for transport aircraft. That is what we had on the parachutes aboard the KC-135 back in the 1980’s. The T-37, T-38, and A-37 all used the BA-22 with the cloverleaf ripcord handle that you have (personal experience). The T-38 ejection seats currently in use no longer use the BA-22, they have been converted to a seat with an integrally installed parachute system. The crew utilizes a personal harness like used on ACES and Martin Baker seats and just clips in to the seat installed parachute risers.

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The smaller "Blast Handle" type is still used on the BAs used in B-52s I believe. The bigger horizontal T handle like you have Derek is still used on the old Northrop seats on T-38As, like what Phantom mentioned about Langley AFB. All the old A model 38s that are used for currency with F-22 and B2 units still have the old Northrop seats where as the AETC 38Cs used for UPT were upgraded with new Martin Baker seats. One of my friends that just separated from the AF a couple years ago was a B-2 pilot and any time he was in their 38As for currency his BA had the same larger horizontal T handle. Also as Phantom mentioned, Airlift aircraft still use that same larger handle too. I have a BA-22 from the 80s that was used by NATO E-3 AWACS in Germany and it had been equipped with a FXC 11000 auto ripcord release.

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Recent B-52 pic I saw online. You can see the blast handle. Side note, cool to see they can equip the BA with a LPU-38 LPFC, and the riser Capewells are equipped with UWARS

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I zoomed in and cropped a pic of my buddy when he was preflighting his T-38A from Whiteman when he came to visit me on a XC. You can see the regular ripcord handle and the key is stowed on the snap. I believe these last era BAs have a Scot Automatic Ripcord Release, but the arming knob on all the various ARRs look the same pretty much. The T-38s from Whiteman also used a PSK type survival kit you can see snapped to the V rings below the chute you can sort of make out in this.

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Av8er and Mohawk - many thanks for the info and photos. They are appreciated.

 

The BA-22 in my photos is one I'm restoring to put with my F-106 ejection seat. So you guys think that the larger, horizontal "T" handle I have on it now would be okay for say a 1980's F-106 seat display?

 

I also have a PCU-10/P personal lowering device (back pad) that I need to snap into place. Hopefully this weekend I can install my newly acquired F-1B and the back pad. I'll be sure to post some photos to this thread when I do.

 

Thanks again for all the comments, photos, and .pdf files gents!

 

-Derek

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All of this does apply in my instance to the 'T' handle as found on my BA-18S wich is in 100% original condition and reportedly assembled in late 1963, however seeing the larger handle in Derek's specimen (and its position relative to chest straps) I think lanyard lenght and arrangement do not vary - some tolerance still should allow sufficient 'play'.

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Derek,

 

here is a link to a parachute that came out of the F-106 at Dover AFB...The 106 was the last of the drones IIRC and was saved...for the museum, flown to Dover in mid 90s, parked...the parachute sat in the sun for years, in the seat...but will help with your 106 Build...

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/274043-parachute-eye-candy-from-f106/

 

And my bad on the D ring use, not having a TO reference, I was passing along info obtained from Life Support...

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Hi Gents,

 

I finally found a nice F-1B Release, Parachute Rip Cord, Automatic to add to one of my BA-22 parachutes that I have. I don't have it in hand yet, but should get it in another day or two. A photo of it is below:

 

 

 

also by better watching, it looks like the secondary lanyard (the zero-delay one) had back then its regular red snap hook attached, and subsequently this latter had been removed - some remnants of cut threadings here and there, plus the evident bending where lanyard was tightly tied around hook's hole.

In case a new replacement hook could be found, for a mere display's purposes it will be sufficient arranging the lanyard correctly: passing once through the hole, then folding the remaining 'tail' a third time and cementing the layers together with some kind of glue for fabrics.

 

Keep the overall lenght 6" from shaft of the activating knob, to hook's end. At least, so it is on my parachute (post #33).

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Av8er and Mohawk - many thanks for the info and photos. They are appreciated.

 

The BA-22 in my photos is one I'm restoring to put with my F-106 ejection seat. So you guys think that the larger, horizontal "T" handle I have on it now would be okay for say a 1980's F-106 seat display?

 

I also have a PCU-10/P personal lowering device (back pad) that I need to snap into place. Hopefully this weekend I can install my newly acquired F-1B and the back pad. I'll be sure to post some photos to this thread when I do.

 

Thanks again for all the comments, photos, and .pdf files gents!

 

-Derek

Please note since you are planning on using your parachute for a F-106 seat display. I looked at my 1980 copy of the F-106 flight manual. There is NO reference to the gold key or zero delay lanyard during preflight. The manual references to a preflight attachment of the “seat parachute lanyard” (which is attached to the seat). There is also no reference to removing the zero delay snap hook passing 10000 feet as in a standard BA-22 as would be used in a T-37 or T-38. This is all consistent with the links to photos of the parachute assembly from the F-106 in Dover. Make sure you do some further research. It looks like the photos of the parachute from Dover are your best bet if you still wish to put your chute into a F-106 configuration. I’m sure it has everything to do with the explosive deployment of the parachute, since the F-106 seat was one of the first zero-zero seats in use.

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@Av8er,

hello, I'm not an expert, and your insights into the F-106 parachute is somehow intriguing to me. Time ago I was looking very much here and there for possible more infos about my two specimens - one true BA-18 from 1963 and one (perhaps) BA-22 from 1977 or 1978 if I'm not wrong. Both 100% complete, both have the 'blast' manual handle and zero-delay lanyard + red hook, with the more recent 'chute sporting an interesting and never before seen variation of the said lanyard - not just the usual one tied at therear of knob, rather one more spring-enveloped lanyard ending with the hook.

So the two coiled springs w/ lanyards inside make sort of 'V': one segment from the activating knob to 'golden key', the other from golden key to manual handle via red hook (when clipped onto). Clearly upon man-seat separation the jerk from seat will pull both lanyard/springs at once (via the golden key, linked to the seat lap belt) and the red hook will override the F-1B mechanism for immediate deployment of canopy when flying very low.

Parachutes are displayed on a couple mannequinns both in a 1960s environment but none is involved with the F-106 plane.

 

I didn't see any more BA- series assemblies with such arrangements, be it first-hand or in photos/videos. I think (not 100% sure) if Derek really prefers focusing at a F-106 parachute he's still correct adding the red hook to have a more complete and a bit more colorful assembly, and choosing the 'blast' handle as this was sometimes seen in very early 1960s photos of fighter pilots - by then the zero-zero seat for F-106 wasn't used yet, if I'm not wrong. This way the red snaphook would make sense, and of course the 'golden key' even more - since this is mandatory and paramount for having the parachute linked to the seat lap belt.

Franco.

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