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I posted this in the Zippo fluid thread, but I'd like to have a separate discussion on this item. I bought this very small gasoline can at an antique shop and would like to know the vintage of it. It's not marked as far as how much fluid it holds, but judging by its size I'm inclined to say it's meant for camp stoves or lanterns. Going off that I wonder if it's for white gasoline instead of leaded gas. Any input would be appreciated.

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Alright, so we will be building the bridge on Lake......Aushwitz?- 1st Lt. Lenon (trying to read a Polish map)

The rim of the crater was a scene of utter desolation. In my boyish euphoria, I raised my M1 and roared “I claim this volcano for the United States of America!” Half in jest, yet aware of the significance of capturing a piece of Japanese homeland, I urinated into the crater. -Cpl. Robert A. Leader

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You have a post WW2 US military 1 quart gas container.

 

The U.S. Container, Fuel, 1-Quart came into being during WW2. It was originally to be supplied to mountain troops, like the 10th Mountain Division. These troops were also issued the M1942 single burner stoves (both wheeled and Mod versions) and the Mountain Cook Set.

It is described in Technical Manual TM 10-275 Principles of Cold Weather Clothing & Equipment 10/26/1944.

There the 1 quart container is described as two versions - the early version with a rubber tube to transfer the gas then a can with a square metal delivery tube affixed to the cap. The earlier version probably proved a poor design thus leading to the metal "tube" version. The later version had a rotating cap that allowed or shut off the fuel flow.

 

The second version is also listed in the Quartermaster Supply Catalog QM 3-4 List of Items For Issue To Troops, Miscellaneous Organizational Equipment dated 1945 as Stock No. 42-C-21340.

 

The third and possibly the final version of the 1 quart can is like yours – basically all were just a 1 quart can like paint thinner comes in – but to simplify production and conserve materials, has a simple metal pour spout fashioned to fit around the can neck and could be swung out for use, then rotated back for storage. The simple can cap also helped with leakage.

 

I have several of the second and third versions. The second is marked on the bottom with the name and part numbers (all my second versions are marked 1951 even though they were identified as early as 1944). The third versions are all unmarked except for the yellow GASOLINE painted on the side.

In all my searching, I have never run across a first version can but would love to add one to my collection so if any of you has one they would like to part with – please contact me!

 

Below are pictures of (1) the can description from TM 10-275, (2) the catalog page from QM 3-4, (3) both 2nd & 3rd versions – 2 2nd ver. with the square tube cap on & off, (4) close up of the 2nd ver. cap, and (5) close up of the 3rd ver. cap.

TM-10-275-page-54.jpg QM-3-4-page-147.jpg 3-gas-cans.jpg tube-gas-can-lid.jpg spout-gas-can-lid.jpg

 

Dwayne

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You have a post WW2 US military 1 quart gas container.

 

The U.S. Container, Fuel, 1-Quart came into being during WW2. It was originally to be supplied to mountain troops, like the 10th Mountain Division. These troops were also issued the M1942 single burner stoves (both wheeled and Mod versions) and the Mountain Cook Set.

 

It is described in Technical Manual TM 10-275 Principles of Cold Weather Clothing & Equipment 10/26/1944.

There the 1 quart container is described as two versions - the early version with a rubber tube to transfer the gas then a can with a square metal delivery tube affixed to the cap. The earlier version probably proved a poor design thus leading to the metal "tube" version. The later version had a rotating cap that allowed or shut off the fuel flow.

 

The second version is also listed in the Quartermaster Supply Catalog QM 3-4 List of Items For Issue To Troops, Miscellaneous Organizational Equipment dated 1945 as Stock No. 42-C-21340.

 

The third and possibly the final version of the 1 quart can is like yours basically all were just a 1 quart can like paint thinner comes in but to simplify production and conserve materials, has a simple metal pour spout fashioned to fit around the can neck and could be swung out for use, then rotated back for storage. The simple can cap also helped with leakage.

 

I have several of the second and third versions. The second is marked on the bottom with the name and part numbers (all my second versions are marked 1951 even though they were identified as early as 1944). The third versions are all unmarked except for the yellow GASOLINE painted on the side.

In all my searching, I have never run across a first version can but would love to add one to my collection so if any of you has one they would like to part with please contact me!

 

 

Wow this is a very helpful reply, thanks for the info. Leave it to the army to try to reinvent the the laquer thinner can three times.

donation2019.gif

 

Alright, so we will be building the bridge on Lake......Aushwitz?- 1st Lt. Lenon (trying to read a Polish map)

The rim of the crater was a scene of utter desolation. In my boyish euphoria, I raised my M1 and roared “I claim this volcano for the United States of America!” Half in jest, yet aware of the significance of capturing a piece of Japanese homeland, I urinated into the crater. -Cpl. Robert A. Leader

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Quartermaster,

1- I noticed in your picture of the type 2 can from QM 3-4 that the can (which was photographed before publication in 1945) has the opening closer to the side than your 1951 dated examples, in a position more similar to the type 3 examples. Is it possible that there are two sub-types of type 2? Perhaps in a second production run in 1951 they moved the opening to the center of the can to help prevent the metal tube from being pushed on and loosening the cap while in a rucksack?

2- the description of the type 1 is kind of confusing, do you think it would have been something like this (see picture)? If so perhaps you can make a recreation for yourself with an old lacquer thinner can and OD spray paint until you find the real thing. https://www.houseofcans.com/screw-cap-cans/accessories/reversible-plastic-spout-caps?houseofcans=2kkm8ck7p4p0blkat812hhqal4

 

post-180172-0-77826200-1585799030.jpg

donation2019.gif

 

Alright, so we will be building the bridge on Lake......Aushwitz?- 1st Lt. Lenon (trying to read a Polish map)

The rim of the crater was a scene of utter desolation. In my boyish euphoria, I raised my M1 and roared “I claim this volcano for the United States of America!” Half in jest, yet aware of the significance of capturing a piece of Japanese homeland, I urinated into the crater. -Cpl. Robert A. Leader

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During the last year I have found two with the twist top to pour, both dated 1951. I was told one found with a white gas Coleman single burner stove. I sold both on this forum. Richard

 

 

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Wanted: WWI ID'ed USMC Green Wool Uniform and ANYTHING documented to my Dad's Iwo Jima outfit: 21st Marines 3rd Div.

Items marked "Marquet, Marquett, or Marquette"

 

 

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I strongly doubt that the first version is anything like you suggested and would rather keep looking for an authentic example. From what I can tell, the fuel delivery on the first can (AKA type one) was through a flexible rubber tube - think black rubber flexible automotive fuel line material. The description says that the top of the tube has a top plug inserted into the metal screw cap. When used the plug was removed by unscrewing, which then allows the tubing to be revealed and is pulled out through the metal cap where a lower plug stops the tube from being completely pulled from the can. This lower plug is then screwed into the threaded hole in the cap apparently to seal the cap to prevent or minimize fuel leakage. This lower plug must be attached to the tube that has a hole in its center to allow fuel flow. It is possible that fuel leakage plus the ease of losing the top plug led to the change to the cans.

 

I vision the tube arrangement somewhat like today's gasoline (Blitz) cans where the nozzle is pushed in through the center of the can cap and pulled out to allow the gasoline to be poured out.

 

Vintage-Blitz-Gas-Can-Nozzle-Pull-Out-Re

 

It is interesting that I had never noticed that the can pictured in the WW2 dated QM catalog had the cap located towards the end of the top and not centered like the examples I own and see quite often. In searching, the only picture of the opening to the side is in that catalog plus I have a copy of the Patton Office paperwork for that cap which seems to have been submitted in 1943 and approved in 1945 that has a drawing of the cap opening to the side.

Dwayne

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BINGO!

 

Plus the delivery tube affixed to the top of the cap appears to be of round stock instead of square - just as shown in the drawings that are a part of the Patent submission.

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Dwayne

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