Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
hawk3370

WW1 Wings

Recommended Posts

Picked up a few new WW1 Wings over the past few months and finally got around to sharing.

This is what I personally believe is the most beautiful bullion wing I have encountered. Made in England by Jones, Chalk & Dawson, 6 Sackville St. West, London, a small private shop. The owner still has the original sewing machine and materials stored in his shop and he claims these wings were made by his grandmother in 1918.

 

post-6022-0-03068300-1585236476_thumb.jpg

post-6022-0-97013300-1585236506_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are beautiful and extremely scarce identified British made wings! Top notch!

 

Chris


767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty cool when the maker and location is marked right on the wings. How many makers of these cloth type wings were there? I would assume a lot more than metal wings.

Picked up a few new WW1 Wings over the past few months and finally got around to sharing.

This is what I personally believe is the most beautiful bullion wing I have encountered. Made in England by Jones, Chalk & Dawson, 6 Sackville St. West, London, a small private shop. The owner still has the original sewing machine and materials stored in his shop and he claims these wings were made by his grandmother in 1918.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

blind pew,

 

Unfortunately, the answer is we have even less information on the makers of bullion wings than we do sterling wings.

 

There were a few well known society goods and military outfitters (MC Lilly, Horstmann, The Army and Navy Store Inc, et. al.) that illustrated embroidered wings in their period catalogs. Some, such as Lilly and Horstmann undoubtedly had the internal manufacturing capacity to make wings, others such as The Army and Navy Store Inc more than likely purchased wings wholesale from suppliers. Unfortunately, very, very few embroidered wings are marked such as Terry's fine example above. Part of why that badge is such a rare treat to see.

 

I am working, with several others, to see if we can't use some statistical analysis to begin to correlate some specific patterns to various training airfields but, even at that, it is likely that the makers themselves may be forever lost to history.

 

Chris


767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was also the E A Armstrong Mfg Co of Chicago that made (or at least sold) bullion wings through the Armstrong Uniform Company. I have seen a couple of bullion wings with their label on the back.

 

E A Armstrong Mfg Co made a lot of military and fraternal swords as well.

 

Their brochure mentions that their tailors made their uniforms, which suggests they didn't contract out (but doesn't prove it either)

post-1519-0-09058200-1585784188_thumb.jpg

post-1519-0-50349300-1585784196.jpg

post-1519-0-57762800-1585784206.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patrick,

 

I also have one of these Armstrong wings. I might use it as a future WWOWW post? Here is a link to a similarly labeled badge From Cliff's collection on Bob's website made by Hertzberg Jewelers in San Antonio:

 

http://www.ww2wings.com/wings/wwi/us/presleyluscher.shtml

 

Maker marked WW1 bullion badges are few and far between!

 

Chris


767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like another job for you and Pat. You guys sure seem to be able to figure out these things a hell of a lot better than many other areas of collecting.

Patrick,

 

I also have one of these Armstrong wings. I might use it as a future WWOWW post? Here is a link to a similarly labeled badge From Cliff's collection on Bob's website made by Hertzberg Jewelers in San Antonio:

 

http://www.ww2wings.com/wings/wwi/us/presleyluscher.shtml

 

Maker marked WW1 bullion badges are few and far between!

 

Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.