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Hello,

I have this TL-122A flashlight that I have tried to restore, but it will not turn on. Here is what I did to give it new life:

 

Replaced Bulb

Removed cellophane from battery shaft

New Batteries

 

I don't know whether it's not making a connection or what. Any ideas? Thanks.

Andrew

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It looks like some rust on the spring - take somepaper and clean that off on the end where it touches the battery: you can also remove the spring and clean the other end where it makes contact with the flashlight body. Also clean the part of the flashlight head where the battery makes contact.


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It looks like some rust on the spring - take somepaper and clean that off on the end where it touches the battery: you can also remove the spring and clean the other end where it makes contact with the flashlight body. Also clean the part of the flashlight head where the battery makes contact.

I'll do that. It takes the standard D battery right? I don't think it comes out because the lid is bent. Thanks.

Andrew

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I had a couple of real bad corroded ones off Ken[remember how bad they were Ken :crying: ] some time ago,All i did is gave all terminal connections a good sanding and a spray/clean with wd40.

 

Does the switch move ok?,May be worth giving it a spray with WD40.

 

Dave.

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**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

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I have restored a number of 122s that were non-functional. I'll outline the steps i normally take.

 

AndrewA74, you've taken many of the same first steps that I do.

 

First, I get 2 new D cell batteries that I know have a good charge. Then i also get a good PR9 (2.7V, .15A) bulb, and put the batteries and bulb in the light. If I don't get any results here, obviously there is a break in the circuit somewhere, so it's time to break out my multi-meter.

With the switch in the "On" position, and the batteries still in (you'll have to remove the bulb assembly for this), check both terminals in the head for voltage (the 20V setting on most multi-meters is good for this). If you don't get anything here, the problem is most likely in the switch, but not necessarily.

Many multi-meters have a continuity function which will sound a tone if electricity flows freely between the two probes. Turn to this setting, and you can isolate the problem. Remove the batteries from the light.

On the 122A the entire body acts as the negative terminal, so simply place the black probe on the inside of body, and then the positive terminal in the head of the light, against the contact which protrudes on the right side (ensure the switch is still on). if you get no continuity, then you know the problem is in the switch. You can also check the continuity between the contact at the top of the battery compartment, and the bottom contact in the head. I have had several lights where the problem stemmed from a bad contact in the top of the battery compartment.

 

Now to clean up that switch. To be honest, I've never tried this procedure on a 122A, but i've used it successfully on Bs, Cs and Ds. I see no reason why it shouldn't work on an A as well, but please proceed at your own risk.

Get some ammonia, and cut it 50/50 with some water. Make sure you do this in a well ventilated area as ammonia is pretty nasty stuff. If the problem is the switch, then most likely tarnish has built up on contacts within the switch. The ammonia solution will remove this tarnish.

Submerge the switch in the mixture for a minute, and then pull it out, and work the switch vigorously. Repeat this a couple times. Then run it under cold water for a couple minutes while working the switch. To ensure that all residue has been rinsed from the switch, I also fill a bowl with boiling water, and then dip the switch in the water. This part is actually pretty neat; if the bowl is transparent, you can see the residue falling out of the switch.

 

Once you're done rinsing the switch, get a hair dryer, and use it to dry the switch very thoroughly. Work the switch while you dry it. You really want to make sure you get all the moisture out of the switch, and the rest of the light, as moisture will undo any good that you've just done. In the summer time, leaving the light out to bake in the sun for a while might be good idea, and I've even heard of people putting their lights in an oven set on low heat (though I would not personally recommend this).

 

Now, once that is all done, try it again. In my experience, if I have isolated the problem to the switch, this will restore functionality to the light. I have yet to come across a light I have not been able to repair in this fashion.

I should emphasize that this will only fix your problem if you're sure that the problem is the switch. Make sure to check all the contacts with your multi-meter.

 

 

Hope this helps you, and please feel free to PM me with any questions you might have.

 

Cheers,

Fletcher

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I have restored a number of 122s that were non-functional. I'll outline the steps i normally take.

 

AndrewA74, you've taken many of the same first steps that I do.

 

First, I get 2 new D cell batteries that I know have a good charge. Then i also get a good PR9 (2.7V, .15A) bulb, and put the batteries and bulb in the light. If I don't get any results here, obviously there is a break in the circuit somewhere, so it's time to break out my multi-meter.

With the switch in the "On" position, and the batteries still in (you'll have to remove the bulb assembly for this), check both terminals in the head for voltage (the 20V setting on most multi-meters is good for this). If you don't get anything here, the problem is most likely in the switch, but not necessarily.

Many multi-meters have a continuity function which will sound a tone if electricity flows freely between the two probes. Turn to this setting, and you can isolate the problem. Remove the batteries from the light.

On the 122A the entire body acts as the negative terminal, so simply place the black probe on the inside of body, and then the positive terminal in the head of the light, against the contact which protrudes on the right side (ensure the switch is still on). if you get no continuity, then you know the problem is in the switch. You can also check the continuity between the contact at the top of the battery compartment, and the bottom contact in the head. I have had several lights where the problem stemmed from a bad contact in the top of the battery compartment.

 

Now to clean up that switch. To be honest, I've never tried this procedure on a 122A, but i've used it successfully on Bs, Cs and Ds. I see no reason why it shouldn't work on an A as well, but please proceed at your own risk.

Get some ammonia, and cut it 50/50 with some water. Make sure you do this in a well ventilated area as ammonia is pretty nasty stuff. If the problem is the switch, then most likely tarnish has built up on contacts within the switch. The ammonia solution will remove this tarnish.

Submerge the switch in the mixture for a minute, and then pull it out, and work the switch vigorously. Repeat this a couple times. Then run it under cold water for a couple minutes while working the switch. To ensure that all residue has been rinsed from the switch, I also fill a bowl with boiling water, and then dip the switch in the water. This part is actually pretty neat; if the bowl is transparent, you can see the residue falling out of the switch.

 

Once you're done rinsing the switch, get a hair dryer, and use it to dry the switch very thoroughly. Work the switch while you dry it. You really want to make sure you get all the moisture out of the switch, and the rest of the light, as moisture will undo any good that you've just done. In the summer time, leaving the light out to bake in the sun for a while might be good idea, and I've even heard of people putting their lights in an oven set on low heat (though I would not personally recommend this).

 

Now, once that is all done, try it again. In my experience, if I have isolated the problem to the switch, this will restore functionality to the light. I have yet to come across a light I have not been able to repair in this fashion.

I should emphasize that this will only fix your problem if you're sure that the problem is the switch. Make sure to check all the contacts with your multi-meter.

Hope this helps you, and please feel free to PM me with any questions you might have.

 

Cheers,

Fletcher

Hi,

Thanks for all of the tips! The switch is hard to move but, like you and others have said, that's worst case scenario. OK, now to find out if my dad has a multi-meter! :lol: . Thanks so much. I'll post how it turns out.

Andrew

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Andrew,

 

Just wondering if you had any luck with the switch on your 122A.

 

Fletcher

 

Hi,

Thanks for all of the tips! The switch is hard to move but, like you and others have said, that's worst case scenario. OK, now to find out if my dad has a multi-meter! :lol: . Thanks so much. I'll post how it turns out.

Andrew

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For old and corroded connections, try deoxit. Deoxit is a red liquid that restores electrical connections. It's more for tiny fragile connections like calculator battery bays, but the connection problems may be inside the flashlight where you can't get to it. A bit of deoxit on a Q-tip should help.

 

John

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  • 6 years later...

Then i also get a good PR9 (2.7V, .15A) bulb, and put the batteries and bulb in the light.

Cheers,

Fletcher

 

Let's correct something in the old thread - I came across the TL-122 with a regular threaded bulb. Does anyone one what type it is?

Always looking for Soviet RKKA 1935-1946 stuff.

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  • 3 weeks later...

No it's a fact that they used both number 14 and and PR9. I have number 14 in very early brass TL-122 without letter "A"

Always looking for Soviet RKKA 1935-1946 stuff.

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A good quality pencil eraser (on the pencil) does a nice job on some of the parts.

 

John

 

That is what I was going to suggest, it is what I use for these. You can also cut a small circle of say 100 grit wet or dry sand paper and glue it onto the end of a pencil for faster cutting. You don't see them any more but old fashioned pens with white ink eraser on the end work better than pencil erasers.

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It's a round one with metal wedged around the edge, so if the glass brakes the whole piece would be due for replacement. I've got 4 or 5 mostly brass TL-122As USA Lite and Eveready ones.

 

Could you post a picture of your tl-122. The early models are hard to find. Does the lense cover holder have flats on the side or is it completely round? Regards

 

post-103304-0-03343500-1433530667.jpg

Always looking for Soviet RKKA 1935-1946 stuff.

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Apparently it would only take the threaded #14 bulb :-)

 

Probably the same bulb, there is a threaded plastic or bakelite ring that fits in there to keep the bulb from falling out.

 

post-103304-0-60518000-1433608349.jpg

Always looking for Soviet RKKA 1935-1946 stuff.

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Also USALIte logo on the lights at some point was changed to JSALite (possibly for Army contract only). U.S. Electric became J.S.Electric.

USALite name is on earlier brass light, while JSALite is on later all-steel TL-122A.

Looks like they modified the old press form and made a mistake: top line "J" is mirrored :-)

post-103304-0-25379900-1433608534.jpg

Always looking for Soviet RKKA 1935-1946 stuff.

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Thank you for posting the additional pictures of your early TL-122 flash light. The stamps on your TL-122A were either stamped weak or were broken during production. They looked that way new in the box.

 

 

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