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WW2 USN LST-246 suit case with uniforms


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LST - 246

LST - 246 was laid down on 12 May 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 22 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Joseph Shaw; and commissioned on 23 August 1943. During World War IT, LST-246 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Marshall Islands operation: (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944 (B) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-May 1945 Following the war, LST-246 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946 when she returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 14 February 1946. On 26 June 1947, she was transferred to the United States Army and struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948. LST-246 earned six battle stars for World War IT service.

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Wonderful grouping! Really like the art on the suitcase. Thank you for posting.

Looking for anything related to WWII ETO gliders and pilots, uniforms, photos, etc. I am also looking for 8th AF B-17 crew uniforms and gear.








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Dress whites. I noticed everthing was folded inside out.

. All US Navy Enlisted uniforms are folded inside out. 16 years worth of hash marks. Cookie looks to have done 20, retired, packed his stuff in this case and moved on.
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. All US Navy Enlisted uniforms are folded inside out. 16 years worth of hash marks. Cookie looks to have done 20, retired, packed his stuff in this case and moved on.

Why are they folded inside out?

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Google grasshopper, google.....Naval History and Heritage Command - How to Fold Your Navy Uniform

 

Folding uniforms inside out allowed the jumpers and trousers to be stored neatly in a minimum amount of space. Pressing the uniforms inside out made the creases match the folds.

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Love this! LSTs were very intriguing vessels, I’m not too far from Evansville where she was launched and they still have one of the only survivors still running up there. Are those musician rates I see? Any idea of his job onboard?

GEN. David R. Atchinson- MO State Guard              ACW

PVT. John H. Drury- Co. A, 27th Ky IR                      ACW               Died of Typhoid

PVT. Henry E. Thomas- Co. I, 17th Ky IR                  ACW

PVT. Joseph E. Drury- Co. E, 356th IR, 89th ID       WWI                WIA

SGT. Edward P. Drury- 51st QM Training Co.           WWII

PFC. Delmer C. Koonter- Co. I, 142nd IR, 36th ID    WWII              WIA

SC3c Michael C. Drury- LCS (L) (3) 70                     WWII

SGT. Steven D. Koonter- 5th Cav, 1st Cav Div         Vietnam

SGT. John M. Drury- 227th AVN Bn. 1st Cav Div     Vietnam

 

Contact me with items from the 36th Infantry Division or any IDd uniforms of European Theater Infantry Divisions

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Love this! LSTs were very intriguing vessels, I’m not too far from Evansville where she was launched and they still have one of the only survivors still running up there. Are those musician rates I see? Any idea of his job onboard?

I know next to nothing about the USN. They are keys. I have no information on Cookie.

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Google grasshopper, google.....Naval History and Heritage Command - How to Fold Your Navy Uniform

 

Folding uniforms inside out allowed the jumpers and trousers to be stored neatly in a minimum amount of space. Pressing the uniforms inside out made the creases match the folds.

WOW! Ok, I recon space is everything and folds do matter. Thanks!

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HA! Cookie was a cook!!! Go figure.

90px-Rating_Badge_CS.jpg Culinary specialist CS (Surface)

(Subsurface)

CS

CSS

Culinary specialists prepare menus and order food items. They operate galley and dining facilities, manage large facilities, keep records for food supplies and financial budgets, and can even serve as flight attendant aircrewmen. They can also serve as a personal food service specialist, household/estate manager or chef for an admiral, the First Family, President of the United States at Camp David and the White House, to the Vice President at Number One Observatory Circle or for a commanding officer aboard ship or at shore bases. Ashore, Culinary Specialists often manage and maintain clubs, TAD hotels and Permanent Party naval barracks.[1
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"Cookie" was a Cook - Commissaryman (CS) Rating

Previously known as Commissary Steward (CS), later as a Mess Management Specialist (MS), currently a Culinary Specialist (CS)
The CS Rating
The Navy Cook rating was one of the original ratings established in 1794 with the passage of "An act to provide a Naval Armament". The name Cook was changed to Ship's Cook in 1838. It wasn't until 1948 that the culmination of the various rates Commissary Steward, Ship's Cook, Ship's Cook ( B ) (Butchers), and Baker consolidated into the Commissaryman rating. In 1975, the name was changed to Mess Management Specialist, and finally to its current name, in 2004, Culinary Specialist.

 

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WOW! Ok, I recon space is everything and folds do matter. Thanks!

. Any navy enlisted uniform with creases down the front of the trousers so pointing out, has been messed with since the Sailor last took it off. Sailors would not fold them right side out. Folding the jumper inside out is how you get the distinctive creases in the collar
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Indeed, they store better that way and space is at a premium on a ship.

Thanks for sharing.

Kurt

My hobby is my job and my job is my hobby. High School and University History Instructor

 

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I have been looking for how many Officers and enlisted would typicaly serve on an LST. I have not been able to find that number. Any ideas?

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— Guy

T

Most of it is fake. But it does have his name:
クッキ クン
Kukki Kun
The “kun” is probably 君 meaning “san”, but spoken by a peer or social superior. Cookie apparently copied some Japanese that I cannot make a connection with. Except for the lead kanji 大 (laThanks to GUY for translating thisrge/big).
— Guy

 

 

ッキ クン
Kukki Kun

The “kun” is probably 君 meaning “san”, but spoken by a peer or social superior. Cookie apparently copied some Japanese that I cannot make a connection with. Except for the lead kanji 大 (large/big).

— Guy

post-169522-0-87710100-1584125685_thumb.jpg

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I have been looking for how many Officers and enlisted would typicaly serve on an LST. I have not been able to find that number. Any ideas?

 

Complement: 8-10 officers, 89-100 enlisted men. Armament: 1 × single 3"/50 caliber gun mount; 8 × 40 mm guns; 12 × 20 mm guns.

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