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any ideas on these wings?


blind pew

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Im not a wing expert. But Ive looked at a lot of them and they look like fakes to me.

The detail is mushy looking.

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I don't collect early wings like that one on ebay. So I;m no help there.

I can say I've done business with that seller several times and always

came away happy. If he says they're real, I'd believe him.

 

v/r,

Owen

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I could be wrong. I've been wrong before on here. And no offense to the seller, but they look like repros.

The real ones are much more detailed.

You can reference them here on Bobs Great Site !

 

http://www.ww2wings.com/wings/wwi/us/us.shtml

 

Im at the advanced beginer level at wing collecting so take it with a spoonfull of salt. lol

But they dont look detailed enough. And although some ww1 wings were cast, these look like cast repros to me.

Maybe Im wrong?

Some folks on here looking right now know for sure..

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Well...………………. he has two other original wings, but has them priced much higher than dealer prices for those wings. I have made a good offer on those wings which is more in line with actual prices for those makers.

 

I don't collect early wings like that one on ebay. So I;m no help there.

I can say I've done business with that seller several times and always

came away happy. If he says they're real, I'd believe him.

 

v/r,

Owen

 

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My 2 cents are that I wouldn't have these in my collection, and especially at those prices. I also suspect that these are not vintage WWI wings.

 

Why you may ask?

 

I think that they may be die struck wings made using NS Meyer/WLink style wings. But where those badges show a fair amount of detail, these don't The "feathering" such as it is, consists of a series of v shaped lines. The stars aren't especially sharp and the lines in the shield are relatively thick and crude.

 

Even if it were a vintage wing, it is rather unlovely. The addition of the star doesn't convince me either. Remember, the best advice is to always buy the item, not the story or the reputation of the seller.....

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Thanks!

 

They certainly look crude and not as nicely detailed as period wings. However, always good to check with those who have a lot of experience and knowledge with wings. Thanks for looking.

My 2 cents are that I wouldn't have these in my collection, and especially at those prices. I also suspect that these are not vintage WWI wings.

 

Why you may ask?

 

I think that they may be die struck wings made using NS Meyer/WLink style wings. But where those badges show a fair amount of detail, these don't The "feathering" such as it is, consists of a series of v shaped lines. The stars aren't especially sharp and the lines in the shield are relatively thick and crude.

 

Even if it were a vintage wing, it is rather unlovely. The addition of the star doesn't convince me either. Remember, the best advice is to always buy the item, not the story or the reputation of the seller.....

 

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For what its worth I have to agree with Patrick, I would put these in a separate case with other very very questionable wings. I certainly wouldn't take a chance on these at that price or for any price for that matter.

 

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Thanks for the look. Oddly, the guy had a Peye and Baker wings which appear to be original (at least to the eyes of this chucklehead) through comparison with other wings.

 

He also has what appears to be an original Eisenstadt, albeit at quite a premium price.

 

I think what all you guys have said about the "14K" sounding alarm bells is a tip well worth remembering.

For what its worth I have to agree with Patrick, I would put these in a separate case with other very very questionable wings. I certainly wouldn't take a chance on these at that price or for any price for that matter.

 

 

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When was the senior pilot star authorized ?

 

Between November 1939 and March 1940 pilot ratings were revised to the permanent three-tier system with objective standards that exists today, with a total of eight ratings overall.[26][n 17] Graduation from Advanced Flying School was required to be rated a Pilot;[n 18] ten years service and 1,800 hours of military flight for Senior Pilot rating;[n 19] and either 15 years service with 3,000 hours, or 20 years service with 2,000 hours, to become a Command Pilot.

Before 1939 there was no such thing as a senior pilot rating.

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Air_Force_aeronautical_rating#World_War_I_and_Air_Service_revisions

 

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I think these are supposed to be Military Aviator's wing. Which were authorized sometime in 1918 (I don't recall the exact date). There were very few aviators who were able to wear those wings

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War Department General Order (GO) #13 16 January 1917. This order stated that to acquire Military Aviator Status, one had to serve three years as an Aviation Officer with the rating of Junior Military Aviator and have successfully passed an appearance before an examining board. On October 27, 1917, the War Department re-designated the half wing as the badge for observers and provided that Military Aviators would wear a star above the shield of the double wing. Junior and Reserve Military Aviators would wear the double wing without star. At that time there were only a hand full of Aviators that qualified for the status of Military Aviator wing with star. Cliff could most likely provide the exact number qualified at that time.

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