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MK II Grenade Fuze/Spoon


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Just picked up an early MK II grenade (with fill hole) that was used as a training grenade for pretty cheap. It came with an M10 style fuze/spoon that I'm a little uncertain about. I believe the pin is post WWII and I think the fuze itself looks fine, but the spoon looks a little off to me. I can't make out any markings on it. Any thoughts one whether it's original or possibly a repop?

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My observation from the pictures. The COTTER PIN is not WW2. The spoon has been bent up and deformed. No engraved markings, but there are many examples of later spoons not engraved but instead only inked, usually the later M6 TNT filled grenade spoon was inked as were foreign made MK2's. Does the spring pivot pin have a half moon on the ends? The half moon is a late war modification. Possible the spoon ink markings were cleaned off? Or a repaint?

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My observation from the pictures. The COTTER PIN is not WW2. The spoon has been bent up and deformed. No engraved markings, but there are many examples of later spoons not engraved but instead only inked, usually the later M6 TNT filled grenade spoon was inked as were foreign made MK2's. Does the spring pivot pin have a half moon on the ends? The half moon is a late war modification. Possible the spoon ink markings were cleaned off? Or a repaint?

 

Thanks for the information. The pin for the spring has a half moon on one side, the other side is sheared rather than either being flat or having the half moon configuration. As for the spoon itself, I'm not seeing any signs of a repaint. The top looks to be a bit worn so it's possible that if the marking was only stamped it may have been worn off. Also, in what way is the spoon deformed? The shape seems to be very similar to the spoon on my M10a2 but I could definitely be missing something. I'm also just noticing that the front lip of the spoon doesn't fit as nicely on the fuze as the M10a2 example I have.

 

Here are pictures of the spring pin and the point where the spoon meets the fuze at the front.

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From what I see on your third picture down, spoon viewed from top, it looks like sharp corners protruding. It could be just the angle, but with the half moon protrusion being broken off on one side it looks like the spoon was squeezed down extremely hard. The half moon shape on the ends of the spring pin was a late war modification added to prevent the spoon traveling to far down and un latching from the front , a directive states that half moon was to be added because under certain instances if squeezed to hard the spoon traveled forward , un latching from the front and the hammer could swing down and hit the primer. Just my speculation, but it would explain why the rounded front is not fitting snugly.

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Looking closer I think you may be on to something with someone squeezing it too hard. Those corners are a bit more pronounced and the curve on the front isn't as tight on this spoon when compared to my M10a2. Though for $45 or so I can't really complain on this one. Might have to try to find a proper cotter pin at some point though.

 

Thanks for the insight on this one!

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Spoon is a reproduction that was manufactured beginning around 20 years ago. The same company was also manufacturing a fuze body from a zinc alloy. These were originally manufactured to fill a niche with the reenactor market.

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I bought a repro spoon once.It looked a lot like this spoon.Same color metal.I think it's a repro.

 

 

Spoon is a reproduction that was manufactured beginning around 20 years ago. The same company was also manufacturing a fuze body from a zinc alloy. These were originally manufactured to fill a niche with the reenactor market.

 

Thanks for the info guys! I'll have to keep my eyes out for an original spoon but for now this one will do.

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Please tell me more about the COTTER PIN as above

 

Thanks, z

 

My (basic) understanding is that some time post war the length of the pins were increased. There may be some other differences (like in material) that I'll let other, more knowledgeable members chime in on, but the length of the pin is one of the obvious differences.

 

Here are some pictures demonstrating the difference. The grenade/pin in question is on the right and my original MK II is on the left

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Thanks Nickman for posting your pictures.The longer cotter pin is later issue. I can't find the design drawings but I do know when the late war blue training grenade went to the different fuze ( M21 grenade, two prong spoon, post war), M205 fuze I recall, the pin was longer. Grenade TM stated the split pin will be bent 40 degrees, or a diamond shape. See the picture below, ( it is an M69 training grenade) but the cotter key diamond shape is illustrated.post-180924-0-10887500-1571862750_thumb.jpeg

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Thanks for that, but not clear: which of the two cotter pins is the vintage?

 

z

 

The top cotter pin is the one off my original MK II (left grenade in the other photo) the bottom cotter pin is off of the training MK II (right grenade in the other photo). The bottom cotter pin is longer and sticks out of the fuze more. Hope that clarifies things.

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