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Great piece. It is a little confusing. The body part 62-58185 does match the B-25 but that handle does not look correct. The curve at the bottom is not correct. The handle should be straight with a slight offset at the top. Is there a part number on the handle?

 

Kat

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Great piece. It is a little confusing. The body part 62-58185 does match the B-25 but that handle does not look correct. The curve at the bottom is not correct. The handle should be straight with a slight offset at the top. Is there a part number on the handle?

 

Kat

I thought the same thing Kat..based on online pics

 

 

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I thought the same thing Kat..based on online pics

 

guess it depends on if this is the pump between the two seats...and if the original handle....I am not versed in the plumbing of the B25...it could be a different pump/location

According to the manuals I looked thru, there were two places for this part number. In between the pilot seats and right behind the seats on the bulkhead above the hatch. Both of these spots had a straight handle. The manual was for a C-D model so could be another spot on a later model. I looked thru a J model manual but did not see one there either.

 

Add: thanks for adding the pictures!

 

Kat

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My list of prefix numbers has 62- being correct for the B-25. 62 A- comes back to a B-25 A and 62 B- comes back to a B-25 B. This number is not found on the B-25 C,D,G,H or J. My list of prefix numbers may have missing information, but overall has been good so far.

B-25 Mitchell Bomber Model Numbers

The first 24 aircraft built had no model letter, but are sometimes referred to as the B-25 NA.

The next 40 aircraft were designated B-25A. There were two main changes in this version: the pilot, co-pilot and bombardier were provided with armor behind their seats, and self-sealing fuel tanks were installed. The last of the 120 B-25B aircraft were delivered in January 1942.

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My list of prefix numbers has 62- being correct for the B-25. 62 A- comes back to a B-25 A and 62 B- comes back to a B-25 B. This number is not found on the B-25 C,D,G,H or J. My list of prefix numbers may have missing information, but overall has been good so far.

B-25 Mitchell Bomber Model Numbers

The first 24 aircraft built had no model letter, but are sometimes referred to as the B-25 NA.

The next 40 aircraft were designated B-25A. There were two main changes in this version: the pilot, co-pilot and bombardier were provided with armor behind their seats, and self-sealing fuel tanks were installed. The last of the 120 B-25B aircraft were delivered in January 1942.

So it looks like the early production runs had prefix numbers related to the model designation. 62- is for the first 24 made. 62-A is for the A model and 62-B is for the B model. At least this is what it looks like to me and that would explain the handle. It was a first production run part not used on later B-25's.

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  • Model: B-25-NA
  • Serial Number: 40-2168
  • NAA Mfg. Number: 62-2837
  • FAA Registration: N282B
  • Mfg. Plant: Inglewood, California
  • Completion Date: February 1, 1941
  • Delivery Date: February 25, 1941
  • Status: Flying
  • Owner: American Airpower Museum
  • Location: Farmingdale, New York
  • Website: http://www.americanairpowermuseum.com/
  • Notable info: Oldest Flying B-25. Number 4 in production.

Only one B-25 NA is flying, note the NAA mfg number is 62-2837

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The manual for the B-25J ( B-25J Parts TO 1B-25J-4) has part number 62-58185. It shows the same part number for the hydraulic pump system between the pilot seats and against the bulkhead behind the pilots seats. The handle for the one between the seats has a slight offset at the top as shown in the picture posted by Phantomfixer. The handle against the bulkhead has a slight curve at the top. I looked thru the manuals for the C, H and J models but see no handle with this sharp of a curve. I could be wrong but I am leaning towards this being something added after it came off the plane. I do not see any place that would have that sharp of a curve.

 

Kat

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This photo shows location

Correct. That is the location for the one in the cockpit. If you look close, you can see the handle in your picture matches the one in the manual posted above. This is not like the handle on yours. I

 

One other thing is that I have always seen these handles painted red. Does your handle show any remnants of red?

 

Kat

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Kat, I put this this some place. Give me a bit to figure out what box I put it in and dig it out. I need to have it in hand before I can answer any further questions with any authority. Of the crash sites I have been to it is common to see older prefix numbers on later aircraft. So I would expect your info to show this number as being on later aircraft. What I don't know is if they changed this part in later production runs or not or as I hinted at before, or if someone made a field alteration, or as you hinted at the alteration was made for another application. I just don't know. The one thing I did notice on the first photo is that the handle on this was never intended to lay flat. Look at the angle and position the handle as it attach's to the pump. Then look at the overall construction as compared to the drawing, not the same. Yours David

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The one thing I did notice on the first photo is that the handle on this was never intended to lay flat. Look at the angle and position the handle as it attach's to the pump. Then look at the overall construction as compared to the drawing, not the same. Yours David

David,

 

I am still looking thru manuals and have not found any handles like yours.

 

I was comparing your picture to the ones in the manual. If you take the part with the handle, remove the two bolts, and flip the part upside down, it appears to maybe match the manual with the handle laying flat.

 

Kat

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There are two versions of the hydraulic hand pump in the B-25.

Like any airplane, improvements were made as operational experience was gained.

Your version is the newer design, the part number 62-58185, which is the p/n for the pump body (new).

I cant speak to the handle, as all the B-25s Ive flown have the straight type with a slight offset at the end.

I believe the hand pump for emergency landing gear extension, which is mounted vertically on the flight deck bulkhead is a different part number.

The hydraulic hand pump between the pilot seats is for manually increasing pressure when there is none.

There is a three position selector valve to direct where you want the pressure to go...NORMAL, BRAKES or LATCH (gear down locks).

It is used if both engine mounted hydraulic pumps fail and adds pressure to the regular system.

We use it routinely to set the parking brake prior to starting engines.

The other pump, for emergency landing gear extension is a completely different system and has its own small hydraulic reservoir.

 

John

 

PS: The image in post #8 is the early system, as it has the single handle emergency brake (item 6), which used an air bottle. Later models had the two handle system, one for each brake using a hydraulic accumulator.

...and on the eighth day, God created the radial engine...

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  • 8 months later...
On 8/21/2019 at 8:35 AM, cutiger83 said:

David,

 

I am still looking thru manuals and have not found any handles like yours.

 

I was comparing your picture to the ones in the manual. If you take the part with the handle, remove the two bolts, and flip the part upside down, it appears to maybe match the manual with the handle laying flat.

 

Kat

Kat, I ran across another hand pump like mine and this is what they came up with,  Is this a possibility?...... One each Hand Hydraulic Pump Assembly, AN6201 - Harvill Corp. p/n: 66-2075. It is complete with the handle and appears to be in either new surplus condition or surplus military overhauled unit. It operates freely and the inlet and outlet ports make a loud wobble sound when handle is operated. It has some paint scuffs from being on the shelf for a number of years. Looking in a 1949 P-51D Mustang parts catalog, I found it on page 117 as AN6201-1. These Hand Hydraulic Pumps were probably used in many other aircraft as well.
Info stamped on side one:
Mod. No. 66-26001
Serial No: B1311
Part No. 66-2075
Harvill Corp.
Info stamped on side two:
Spec. No. AN-P-14
AN6201

s-l1600fcum,ktu.jpg

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