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Late 1880s Cavalryman's rig


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Given a decidedly late period for the display, not before autumn 1890 at least being the blouse the (1° Variation) Pattern 1890 (not more than 2,000 manufactured in April - May of that year) the Springfield carbine should be more correctly the 'Model 1884' - even though, it was issued starting in early 1887. But anyway its rearsight should be, necessarily we can say, the so-called 'Buffington Pattern' that had been first introduced in late 1885, replacing the earlier pattern as found on thousands of 'Model 1877' carbines.

 

However no wish on my side about starting to look for a more correct Model 1884 carbine meant to replace my Model 1877 that is equipped with the older rearsight. Thus I was looking here and there to find a possible exception in the rule and after some time I was almost impressed when happening on a vintage photo, last days of December 1890, some members from 9th Cavalry posing for the picture: at least two of them have Springfield carbines still equipped with the previous reasight, and they both have most of the gun hidden by their arms up to the 'right' point - rearsights are just visible yet unmistakable !!! Somehow a stroke of luck.

Whatever the reason(s), some Model 1877 guns were out there in very late 1890 (and much likely, in early 1891 as well?) so from this standpoint my display might look not too uncorrect.

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Thanx so much for appreciating. Here a last couple pics of the blouse, lighting wasn't optimal in the above one. As said before: that taking photos of a dark blue woolen item is not easy, could actually be an understatement, for some valid reasons.

 

This sub-pattern (unofficially, 1st Variation) of the later Pattern 1890 fatigue blouse was made only in 2,000 pieces in late springtime of that year, before the 2nd Variation would start production in late summer. The only and not paramount difference, two inside breast pockets for #2 Variation vs. one pocket of the #1 Variation (at left-side breast).

 

post-151851-0-58008100-1570299893_thumb.jpg

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Some nice rigs posted here. Thanks for posting. Here are some of my period correct rigs.

 

An early pre -1871 Cavalry rig. With one - off Scout belt, post CW Model 1860 holster reissue and US issued Richards Colt 1860 conversion used prior to Smith and Wesson 1st Model American issue. Also Sharps SRC conversion and original period ammo.

post-151994-0-11730600-1573843288_thumb.jpg

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Thanx for appreciating Rush,

your items are very nice and I think, not easy to get still in good shape - revolver and holster especially are gorgeous, and that Sharps is a beauty indeed. I've got one of these converted carbines years ago, possibly from a later period of converting/assembling (maybe springtime or summer 1869), in my opinion it's really cool-looking. My intentions was back then about having the Sharps as a centerpiece for a small cavalry display, however it would have been virtually impossible getting other needed items (original items) from this relatively early timeframe so I gave up and selected a subsequent one.

 

Will take photos of my Sharps tomorrow and post them here, exploiting that to have some looking at it again after some time. Some 50-70 ammos I've got as well but those are modern brass cases (Starline if I'm correct) reloaded with modern bullets, just to look good when in their ammo belt.

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Here an unobstructed view of the Pattern 1890 blouse, First Variation - 2,000 pieces produced in late springtime 1890. Outline of the inside pocket is visible on left breast.

 

attachicon.gif 003 - Copia (2).JPG

Unlined right?

 

Earlier 5-button jackets with interior pockets that were lined typically did not show stitching on the exterior I believe since the pockets were let into the lining?

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Hello, jacket is satin-lined (an ultra-dark blue, almost black depending from the lighting) and pocket actually is sewed to the shell so, stitching is visible outside. My fault, I didn't provide pics of satin, only outside of jacket.

 

Pocket is actually made of the same material as the shell, blue wool fabric. The rectangular piece is sewn at the two vertical side and at the bottom; however parallel to the opening, jacket's satin is interrupted (pocket itself isn't lined internally) and a fourth line of stitching is necessary to hold the satin there. Thus we see from outside the whole pocket outlined.

Will provide a couple photos.

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