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Flightpath

ESM/1 and ESM/2 Mirrors.....

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Hi,

 

I am putting together a very small set of emergency items that a USN/Marine pilot might carry in the Pacific area, would the AAF ESM/1 and ESM/2 mirrors be carried by Naval aviators?

 

While I'm asking... what about the aluminium sided pocket knife marked US MARINE CORPS, would that be something a pilot would carry or be issued in a kit or the AAF Wittnauer pocket watch type compass?

 

cheers, John (Still learning!)


Interested in US Naval and Marine aviation history, aircrew wings & insignia.

WW2 US Navy and Marine Grumman Wildcat, Avenger & Douglas SBD aircraft.

Also interested in US 5th AF in Australia.


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What timeframe are you reaching for? that is the most important factor.

Ultimately there is no one simple answer in the overall scope, so the more specific the question the better.

 

The all stainless steel MILK knife (aliminum sided as you mentioned) is a huge definate No for sure as its a very late war item. pocket knives were carried but of the jigged bone type or acetate handled types, many many variations of those.

The Navy/USMC did not use the ESM/2, the ESM/1they did and it would be a later war implement mid-1944 thru 1945.

The pocket compass was in some circulation within but not really mainstream, better to go with the match safe compass or wrist compass if late war.

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Thanks dustin,

 

I know of the AAF E-17 escape kit, was there a simular kit used by the Navy? (I thought I'd seen a Navy pilot with something simular).

 

cheers, John


Interested in US Naval and Marine aviation history, aircrew wings & insignia.

WW2 US Navy and Marine Grumman Wildcat, Avenger & Douglas SBD aircraft.

Also interested in US 5th AF in Australia.


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Technically speaking, the E-17 was not authorized for issue as aeronautical material for the Navy or Marines, however, it did get used by them on a limited basis in the Asiatic-Pacific. So this means it wouldn't being entirely inaccurate to use one but not the norm. This type of material was handled by the joint military intelligence centers such as MIS-X,POA and MIS-X-SWPA. These organizations were the clearing houses for many of these E&E type of materials for the Navy, Marines and AAF. Some materials were ear marked for certain organizations such as the E-17 for USAAF commands, however, there are many common shared materials. The E-17 kits seen in use by Navy and marine aviation activities would had been specific requisitions by their command or intelligence officer. Those kits shipped to the theater were on specific request by commands for projected issue, those Navy and Marine units would have had to obtain special permission to obtain them. In some cases, for a period of time, units were under USAAF jurisdiction so ipso facto they would be entitled to this type of equipment that would had otherwise not been authorized.

The Navy, in evaluation of the E-17, liked the concept but not its bulk. They in turn developed their own version being a streamlined version of one flask titled as the Mark I Emergency Flask Kit. It is a cross between the USAAF E-17 and E-3 series flask kits. For a very long time it was called the "Navy E-3A" for the lack of knowing its actual designation, It is officially known as the Mark I.

These were eventually distributed widely as a standard, but since they are so easily concealable they are rarely seen in use and are a late war item, not seeing service till 1945.

You have to be careful about "seeing something similar" since the Navy and Marines made a huge variety of locally compiled emergency kits that at a glance can be mistaken for an E-17. Having a pouch that would be worn on the belt with emergency provisions was a very popular application throughout the war until these flask type kits became available and is actually their origin, which were developed by service recommendations.

Here is what the Mark I looks like, pretty easy to spot since the very first line item listed is NAVY EMERGENCY RATION

 

post-56-0-63309800-1555788768.jpg

 

 

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Thanks for the info, so where do I find a Mark 1? :)


Interested in US Naval and Marine aviation history, aircrew wings & insignia.

WW2 US Navy and Marine Grumman Wildcat, Avenger & Douglas SBD aircraft.

Also interested in US 5th AF in Australia.


donation2013.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gif

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Ha,

 

I tried that, the reply was that they are out of stock! ;)


Interested in US Naval and Marine aviation history, aircrew wings & insignia.

WW2 US Navy and Marine Grumman Wildcat, Avenger & Douglas SBD aircraft.

Also interested in US 5th AF in Australia.


donation2013.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gif

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