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Rock Island M1903 Springfield


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A batch of RIA receivers were shipped to Springfield in 1928 for assembly. I have one very similar to yours. The stippled butt plate is a USMC trait. I have heard that many if not all of the 1928 rifles went to the USMC.

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I used to own RIA '03 #308! It too had a 1919 dated barrel. Also had stippled buttplate. Interestingly, I also owned the 308th from the LAST '03 made a Springfield. Barrel was dated 1/45 -- assembled from spare parts with a WW1 era stock.

 

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I think the stock looks fine on this early arsenal rebuild rig. I personally don't see any issues with the stock at all and believe that this has what you would want to see. Not every rebuilt (almost all were) 03 will have a stamp on the stock, really depends on the arsenal and time that it was refit for service.

Always looking for 325th G.I.R. and WWII USMC items!
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I believe the rifle to be Marine and most likely it went through two rebuilds by the Marines.

 

The first time was most likely when the Marines screwed on that barrel. The Marines did not receive any new rifles that would have had a 1929 barrel date, other than it possibly being a Navy rifle received in 1942. The Marines swapped some barreled receivers in the 1920s with RIA, but by the time of this barrel date the Marines did not receive any new receivers or rifles until 1942 from the Navy. The only new complete production rifles received by the Marines between 1919 and 1940 were Brand New NM rifles. The Marines ordered a lot of spare barrels for swaps in the very late 1920's and very early 1930's. I believe this 1929 barrel is one of the loose replacement barrels the Marines ordered. Even though I do believe the Marines screwed on that barrel, it will not show vise marks like the WWII era rebuilds. If it did show vise marks, it would probably be a recycled barrel off a unserviceable receiver from the WWII era.

 

It would have had to go in again for another rebuild post the fall of 1938 to receive the Hatcher Hole. That is probably where it picked up that stock as well, as the Mariens were scrounging stocks from the Army and Navy, and a lot of early stocks were used in rebuilds. The bolt has Marine traits, but could have been swapped at any point.

 

One thing to look for is the front sight blade, it might have a number on it. Like a .40 or something to that nature. With a 1929 barrel date and a Hactcher hole, if it hasn't been swapped, it is very likely to have a numbered front sight blade.

 

To me I have little doubt that was a Marine rifle and went through two rebuilds with them.

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I believe the rifle to be Marine and most likely it went through two rebuilds by the Marines.

 

The first time was most likely when the Marines screwed on that barrel. The Marines did not receive any new rifles that would have had a 1929 barrel date, other than it possibly being a Navy rifle received in 1942. The Marines swapped some barreled receivers in the 1920s with RIA, but by the time of this barrel date the Marines did not receive any new receivers or rifles until 1942 from the Navy. The only new complete production rifles received by the Marines between 1919 and 1940 were Brand New NM rifles. The Marines ordered a lot of spare barrels for swaps in the very late 1920's and very early 1930's. I believe this 1929 barrel is one of the loose replacement barrels the Marines ordered. Even though I do believe the Marines screwed on that barrel, it will not show vise marks like the WWII era rebuilds. If it did show vise marks, it would probably be a recycled barrel off a unserviceable receiver from the WWII era.

 

It would have had to go in again for another rebuild post the fall of 1938 to receive the Hatcher Hole. That is probably where it picked up that stock as well, as the Mariens were scrounging stocks from the Army and Navy, and a lot of early stocks were used in rebuilds. The bolt has Marine traits, but could have been swapped at any point.

 

One thing to look for is the front sight blade, it might have a number on it. Like a .40 or something to that nature. With a 1929 barrel date and a Hactcher hole, if it hasn't been swapped, it is very likely to have a numbered front sight blade.

 

To me I have little doubt that was a Marine rifle and went through two rebuilds with them.

Steve summed this up perfectly. That is a great rifle, thanks for sharing

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