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Unknown horse patch but recently seen on $2700 jacket


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I was going through random patches today in my junk drawer and found this one. Appears to be british made? 3" in diameter.

 

Is it a cavalry patch? Thanks in advance. post-122868-0-58152800-1550187667_thumb.jpg

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Nice patch. Ive had a few older nypd patches bring decent money.

 

That's what I was wondering and thank you for confirming that. The article says the design dates back to 1904. Hard to tell when this particular one was made, so it is worth researching.

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Well there you go! This variation is a black back, on twill, with a blue eye

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-NYPD-Cheese-Cloth-Horse-Head-Patch/323678034294?hash=item4b5cb6d976:g:f1YAAOSwyWZZWWyH:rk:1:pf:0

 

Thanks to all for helping me solve this mystery.

 

 

 

I still find it very weird that this patch found it's way on the jacket that sold for $2600. I am sure a policeman joined the military and brought it....or someone sent the person it.

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Well there you go! This variation is a black back, on twill, with a blue eye

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-NYPD-Cheese-Cloth-Horse-Head-Patch/323678034294?hash=item4b5cb6d976:g:f1YAAOSwyWZZWWyH:rk:1:pf:0

 

Thanks to all for helping me solve this mystery.

 

 

 

I still find it very weird that this patch found it's way on the jacket that sold for $2600. I am sure a policeman joined the military and brought it....or someone sent the person it.

 

 

or a kid collected patches after the war and sewed them on dads shirt??..the 101st pre war looks like a patch king/hobby guild

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Absolutely confirm that horse patch is NYCPD. The Language school patch is probably the most costly. Bigger question is where is the 2700 worth of patches? Truly maybe 7 or so high end patches on jacket and to me realistic retail is more like half of cost. The airborne 674th is WW2 period I believe and one shown is US made which is in $100 range. The Japanese made of silk are more in the 4-600 range if you could ever fine them. The Watchman patch sold recently on ebay for over $350. The 746th Armd is 125-200 depending on condition. The language school on ebay is asking $800 and has not sold so what is actual value maybe 450 or so now. Prices are down overall so where is 2700 in value if resold. Do not think that jacket would sell at SOS for that money,

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Depending on who you ask you will get a variety of answers. Can only speak of patches. The really rare ones still command their price. Items that at one time were considered rare but with the advent of ebay, etc are now seen alot, for example the white tongue 101st the prices are not what they once were. WW1 patches are generally depress from peak period. WW2 Fighter and Bomber Sq are down 1/3 from peak. VN items generally are not getting the price they once had. Just my opinion but WW1 and VN markets were hurt by the fakes and repros so that there is little confidence; you have to know the seller. Think about it; on the forum half the questions are "is it real?". There is big difference in ebay on the Buy it Now price and what same item actually sells for in an auction. Granted some throw out numbers and hope for the best; but the market determines what is value. Yesterday a very nice 158 Bushmaster with tab sold for close to 700 in apparent bidding war. No way is it that much, especially seeing what some WW2 examples have sold for,multiple selling at $100 range,so is tab worth $600?This is just my opinion and it was a very nice combination and I bid on it but no where close to final price. To summarize as a generality the prices are off 1/3 from peak.

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bunkerhillburning

Interesting.

 

Are you seeing an influx of younger collectors at the shows, 20's and 30's? Does the younger generation have interest in patches?

 

A lot of collectibles and antiques markets have no new buyers. Prices are way down in a lot of areas.

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Interesting.

 

Are you seeing an influx of younger collectors at the shows, 20's and 30's? Does the younger generation have interest in patches?

 

A lot of collectibles and antiques markets have no new buyers. Prices are way down in a lot of areas.

 

 

I know my angle from my 9 years at a large army/navy store that just ended, no, millennials are not filling the gaps left by baby boomers. You have your special cases where that one kid comes in and "gets it." But that iis a true rarity. I think dealers are reluctant to admit that patch collecting really was a baby boomer's hobby. I know that as an X Gen growing up in the 1970's and 1980's hitting the gun shows as a 10 year old patch collector, I was that special case kid who just happened to be into collecting militaria. My peers were too interested in the arcade, D&D or girls to be bothered.

 

This is my theory of the slowdown. This is just my opinion. But for most guys, their collecting hobby is usually tied to their childhood. This can be anything from GI Joes to baseball cards. For baby boomers, many had dads who were WWII vets, and have memories of playing with their dad's bayonets, German helmets or Japanese swords. They remember opening up a chest and seeing flags and lugers. They might remember their dad or uncle talking war stories. I am not saying all, but many. This tie to their fathers and their own childhoods created a bond for baby boomer militaria collectors and the artifacts they collect. That link was broken by my generation; the generation whose grandfathers fought in the war. Millenials are even further from that. They have no link to the past and as such, have little interest in it. They are distracted by social media and the Xbox.

 

There has been a solid decline in the interest in militaria as the baby boomers pass away. There simply are not the numbers of collectors to replace them. I tell young collectors that they are going to find themselves inundated with availability as the old collectors pass away. This is reality. Not a pleasant one, but it is what it is. Some dealers will try to avoid such talk as it does affect their business. I know several of my long term collecting baby boomer friends currently have no luck trying to move their items at the prices they want. Movies will only peak prices for so long, as such, 101st patches are on the down hill. We need to figure out how to interest the future collectors. Without them, we will find the hobby a thing of the past.

 

Will top end items command a premium? Absolutely, they always will, but that is just the tip of the huge militaria iceberg.

 

-Ski

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bunkerhillburning

Very interesting response. Thank you for that.

 

I wonder if a thread soliciting dealers and collectors opinions and observations on the subject would be well received. It is a subject that needs to be discussed.

 

Ever been to a stamp show? Just a sad spectacle and has been for years. Seeing a young person there is uncommon to say the least. Most buyers and sellers are over 60 years old.

 

It's been happening in all aspects of antiques and collectibles.

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BILL THE PATCH

Don't forget schools aren't really teaching how great America is. There plenty of teachers that do care and they are the diamond in the rough. I'll say 85% of schools are run by( trying not to get political) liberal lefties commies who hate America and everything it stands for. So why would a kid want to collect us military when he's told how bad this country is. Our hope is the children of the vets who are proud of mommy and daddy or brother or sister. They will appreciate it

 

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

 

 

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I know my angle from my 9 years at a large army/navy store that just ended, no, millennials are not filling the gaps left by baby boomers. You have your special cases where that one kid comes in and "gets it." But that iis a true rarity. I think dealers are reluctant to admit that patch collecting really was a baby boomer's hobby. I know that as an X Gen growing up in the 1970's and 1980's hitting the gun shows as a 10 year old patch collector, I was that special case kid who just happened to be into collecting militaria. My peers were too interested in the arcade, D&D or girls to be bothered.

 

This is my theory of the slowdown. This is just my opinion. But for most guys, their collecting hobby is usually tied to their childhood. This can be anything from GI Joes to baseball cards. For baby boomers, many had dads who were WWII vets, and have memories of playing with their dad's bayonets, German helmets or Japanese swords. They remember opening up a chest and seeing flags and lugers. They might remember their dad or uncle talking war stories. I am not saying all, but many. This tie to their fathers and their own childhoods created a bond for baby boomer militaria collectors and the artifacts they collect. That link was broken by my generation; the generation whose grandfathers fought in the war. Millenials are even further from that. They have no link to the past and as such, have little interest in it. They are distracted by social media and the Xbox.

 

There has been a solid decline in the interest in militaria as the baby boomers pass away. There simply are not the numbers of collectors to replace them. I tell young collectors that they are going to find themselves inundated with availability as the old collectors pass away. This is reality. Not a pleasant one, but it is what it is. Some dealers will try to avoid such talk as it does affect their business. I know several of my long term collecting baby boomer friends currently have no luck trying to move their items at the prices they want. Movies will only peak prices for so long, as such, 101st patches are on the down hill. We need to figure out how to interest the future collectors. Without them, we will find the hobby a thing of the past.

 

Will top end items command a premium? Absolutely, they always will, but that is just the tip of the huge militaria iceberg.

 

-Ski

 

Ski,

 

I would say that's a spot on assessment.

 

I know ONE younger generation millennial person who is highly interested in WW2 and militaria- ONE- and I know for a fact his peers consider him to be an 'oddball' because of his fascination and love for history of that period and for collecting patches and militaria.. and that's sad for more than just the collecting hobby, because I really have myself learned a lot more about the battles and the men who fought them since I've become a patch collector.

 

The last show I was able to go to in my area before I moved, I can say there weren't any 'kids' there- I think the youngest fellow I saw there was maybe in his mid 30's. As a kid, I had no way to get to any shows as my dad wasn't interested in it and my mother was a peacenik hippy leftover who hated guns, and eschewed anything military or gun show related and very much discouraged us from collecting 'junk' like militaria.

 

I am a late bloomer myself in the patch collecting field because I made choices when I was younger that prevented me from being able to afford or want to afford spending my extra money on anything military related. I was that kid at the pinball machine pumping quarters in at the arcade and playing fantasy games of Dungeons and Dragons.. but I did collect coins and stamps [all since sold off to fund other interests] and I know those hobbies are suffering the same way this one is. I don't have tens of thousands of dollars invested in patches, but the ones I do collect now are more of the high end ones- something I learned from collecting stamps and coins when I got rid of them was that in the future if I was going to collect stuff like patches it was going to be desirable ones that when I'm gone someone will get something back on.....or hopefully keep and enjoy them the way I do..

 

that's my two cents.

 

dave

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vintageproductions

I dont agree with some of the above statements.

Vietnam patches are not down it is just more of a focused collector who goes after them. The repros have not hurt the original pieces for serious collectors, it has only hurt the person who finds an occasional Vietnam patch as is not familiar with the proper construction techniques. Just today at the SOS I had three of my best Vietnam collectors come up to the table and judging by them there was no slow down in the market.

Same thing on young collectors. There are lots of them, just go on Facebook and look. They just do not collect in the old traditional way, they use social media and are super focused on what they like and collect.

Some of the WWII theatre made pieces sold much slower this year at SOS, but they were still selling.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Crymetimes123

Im in my early 20s. One day my girlfriend came over after I just picked up a huge collection. My coffee table was covered with patches. She just looked at me and said Ive never met anyone into this, its pretty cool. We are still dating so I guess she didnt think it was that weird. ?

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