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Unboxing grandfathers uniform and transferring to recently acquired trunk


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My grandfather passed away several years ago and left me his military uniform and other items. I didn't pick them up from storage because I knew they were well-packed and safe, but recently decided to go. This was the first time I had seen it. My grandmother packed it away when he was diagnosed with frontal dementia and they moved to be closer to us. While going through a cigar box, I found his ribbons and noticed some are different sizes. His older brother was in the Army during WW2 throughout Europe and died early post-war. I can't think of any other reason my grandfather would have ribbons that were not his own. I was hoping somebody here could identify the ones that don't have a duplicate. I know what those ones are(pacific campaign, occupation,ww2 victory). There is also one loose ribbon not attached that looks like a different size. Anybody know its' significance? My grandfather was not a collector and got rid of many of his things after the war.

I had some time today so I decided to transfer his uniform into a trunk I recently bought from the estate of a ww2 army veteran. My greatest fear is moths, and failing to preserve these things that mean so much. After cleaning and dusting, I got to it. I also took a picture of a very old label on the trunk that somehow remained attached for all these years. If anyone knows the era of the label or trunk, that would be great! You can almost read the stencil on top that was painted over. Looks like it was addressed to a PFC at Camp Mccoy. Thank you and enjoy,

 

 

 

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Nice job preserving his uniform, moths and moisture are the enemies of old uniforms. As far as the rack of 5 ribbons, I'm having a hard time identifying them, but someone here will be able to. They aren't WW2 ETO though.

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Nice job preserving his uniform, moths and moisture are the enemies of old uniforms. As far as the rack of 5 ribbons, I'm having a hard time identifying them, but someone here will be able to. They aren't WW2 ETO though.

 

Thank you, he and my grandmother did most of the work. If she saw as much as a single moth or anything for that matter in her home, I'm sure she wouldn't be satisfied until she got it. Well now i'm really interested. If they weren't his brothers or his, I have no idea. That is odd. He was a minimalist and kept almost nothing

Its always awesome to have items from family members like that! Keep his memory alive.

I agree, I'm still trying to track down the service records for my other relatives. One day if I have children, I can hopefully give them this piece of history to remember their great grandfather by. My grandma told me how he learned to identify the silhouettes of Japanese aircraft. I wish I had cared to ask him more when he was still around.

 

the samller ribbons could be ROTC

Interesting, although I know he exaggerated about his age to get in. He was turned away several times because of his age. The recruiter eventually told him(according to my grandma): "look, you're just wasting your time coming down here. You need to be at least 17 and have your parents permission..." and some other stuff. I am not as good at telling stories. I think that is exactly what he did, but he may have been 16. I'm fuzzy on that too. I need to double check his records. I don't think he finished high school, but eventually got the equivalent after the war.

 

I'm looking at a dark / small photo of the ribbons, but I think you may have a set of Japanese ribbons. Maybe your grandfather picked up a souvenir .

 

Thank you for responding and that would be a huge twist in this story. I'm attaching better quality photos. After taking a closer look to try to identify differences, the small individual one looks to match my grandfathers ribbon bars and if you look closely at the back, you can read los angeles on one of the bars as well as that individual one. The ribbon bars that are attached together look completely different. The back has a single flat metal clip that would presumably attach it to the uniform. No english writing and I see no distinguishing marks. The only other possibility I can think of is his time in Taiwan post war as a civil engineer, but that wouldn't really make sense since he wasn't active in the USMC at that time so wouldn't be eligible for military awards or achievements.

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Holy Cow! I think You are right about them being japanese ribbons. After googling them, I don't know what else they could be. They even have the frilly edges.

I'm looking at a dark / small photo of the ribbons, but I think you may have a set of Japanese ribbons. Maybe your grandfather picked up a souvenir .

 

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I think that's it: http://www.imperialjapanmedalsandbadges.com/ribbonbars.html

 

The single ribbon is the occupation ribbon and would have been awarded well after the other 3 on the bar.

Yep! I looked up 4/5. the top two from left to right are the 1920 first national census and the Manchurian incident medal. The bottom row is the boxer rebellion war dispatch medal, middle:unknown, and the Order of the rising sun. This must have been from an older soldier since the boxer rebellion took place in 1900 unless I'm incorrect. Might have picked this up in Okinawa or who knows where. Huge surprise that he would have something like this.

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Nice group of material and even better that it is family. I am guessing that at the end of the war his unit was posted to occupation duty in japan given the single occupation ribbon and while in Japan he must have picked up the ribbons as a souvenir. Thanks for sharing.

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Very cool! Always nice to see family items!

Happy to be able to share them here

 

Nice group of material and even better that it is family. I am guessing that at the end of the war his unit was posted to occupation duty in japan given the single occupation ribbon and while in Japan he must have picked up the ribbons as a souvenir. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks, I think that is a good deduction and could be very likely. Wish I could ask him!

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A real treasure chest ! I'm sure he wanted you to have them, The occupation ribbon says that's were he picked up the Japanese stuff. Cool Be proud of his service and him! God Bless your grandfather. RIP Marine.


Pvt. James H. Honey 1st Md. Eastern shore Vol. Inf. Co. D (union) Gettysburg
Pvt. George Eddie Lear 26th Inf. Co.H 1st Div .(WW1) P.H. WIA Cpl. Richard Elsea 268th C.A. Bn. Battery A. WW2 SSgt. Grant Elsea 314th Inf. Hq.Co. I.R.79thDiv. WW2
Cpl. Harry Lawrence Butler Jr 23rd Regt. WIA Korea Lt. George Olin Tilghman 111th MG. 29th Div. WW1 DIS France 1919
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Holy Cow! I think You are right about them being japanese ribbons. After googling them, I don't know what else they could be. They even have the frilly edges.

 

agree japanesee ribbons.The backing plate and clasp on the back are typical Japanese manufacture

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I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
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"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

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agree japanesee ribbons.The backing plate and clasp on the back are typical Japanese manufacture

I have one more to identify(lower center ribbon), but the owner of these ribbons participated in the boxer revolution war(1900), which probably makes him an older officer(50-60). The order of the rising sun was awarded for meritorious military achievement.

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I have one more to identify(lower center ribbon), but the owner of these ribbons participated in the boxer revolution war(1900), which probably makes him an older officer(50-60). The order of the rising sun was awarded for meritorious military achievement.

 

The link that MattS sent shows The 2nd ribbon on the lower row is for the 1939 Inner Mongolia

National Foundation Medal.

 

http://www.imperialjapanmedalsandbadges.com/ribbonbars.html

 

Bill

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http://s224.photobuc...d237/wgravessr/


 

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