Jump to content

Removing creases from paper posters


Recommended Posts

Greetings fellow preservationists!

 

I recently acquired a poster-sized parts identification drawing of a Browning Model 1918 Machinegun (still perplexed by the model because it is largely a 1917 watercooled) that has been stored folded for most of its life. I would like to get the creases out and have it framed behind low UV glass and hung in my library.

 

Is there a way to get creases out of paper?

 

I think that the material is actually drafting paper referred to as vellum.

 

 

I'll post pictures shortly. Need to lay it out and photograph it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Folds are pretty much there for good...you could lay it out flat and place heavy items such as books along the crease if they're not too brittle and flatten it the best you can. Best to put the exterior of the crease facing up and place the books atop that...but again it'll only do so much

-Brig
GySgt/USMC/0369
RSU-Quantico


"FOR OUR TOMORROWS, THEY GAVE THEIR TODAYS"
RIP
Sgt Jesse 'Jeff Nasty' Balthaser
Sgt John P Huling
Cpl Carlos 'Gilo Monster' Gilorozco
Cpl Stephen C 'Socks' Sockalosky
LCpl Joshua A 'Scottie' Scott
LCpl Jason Lee 'Birdman' Frye
LCpl Nicolas B Morrison
LCpl Jon T Hicks
LCpl Osbrany 'Oz' Montes De Oca
Pvt Lewis T D Calapini
'The SOI 5'

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, leave it alone and frame it as is. I have some framed copies of Stars and Stripes form V-E Day and you can hardly see the creases.

donation2016.gif

donation2017.gif


Andy
ASMIC# 5617

Looking for the following Items:
Original WWII SSI (all services)

Original Theater made OEF/OIF Patches

ALWAYS INTERESTED TO TRADE DUPLICATES

Link to post
Share on other sites

From Wikipedia - "Modern "paper vellum" is a made of synthetic plant material, and is called such for its usage and quality similarities. Paper vellum is used for a variety of purposes including tracing, technical drawings, plans." I doubt this poster was made from animal skin.

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I can't edit my own posts. I was going to put the pictures above in my first post.

 

No animals were harmed in the making of this drawing. :) It is done on drafting paper vellum.

 

Let me re-word my question: does anyone have experience in removing creases from documents, posters, pictures, or drawings?

 

cO1ceIm.jpg

 

0SAylLl.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

From Wikipedia - "Modern "paper vellum" is a made of synthetic plant material, and is called such for its usage and quality similarities. Paper vellum is used for a variety of purposes including tracing, technical drawings, plans." I doubt this poster was made from animal skin.

Ahhh, modern paper. The vellum I have is in the form of Presidential land grants from Monroe and Jackson and those are animal skin, not fake vellum.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can usually relax folded paper simply by placing it on a rack (like the one my wife uses in the kitchen to cool hot baked goods on), in the presence of humidity (aka gentle steam) inside an enclosed container (such as a plastic storage tub of the correct size). Don't spray water directly on the paper. All you want to do is introduce some moisture back to the paper fibers over a period of time.

I usually used a baking pan of hot water in the bottom of the container, with the rack on top of that, and the lid on.

 

Just leave it in there awhile (a few hours or a day or so) and then bring it out and put it under a piece of glass or plexi (one that fits side to side top to bottom of the paper) with some weight on top. Repeat as or if needed.

 

In most cases (I've even done this with rolled up yard-longs!) that process will take care of the average problem as well as can be done without spending possibly in the hundred$ to have a conservator do pretty much the exact same thing.

HONORING FAMILY LtCol Wm Russell (1679-1757) VA Mil; Pvt Zachariah McKay (1714-97) Frederick VA Mil; BrigGen Evan Shelby, Jr (1719-94) VA Mil; Pvt Vincent Hobbs (1722-1808) Wythe VA Mil; Pvt Hugh Alexander (1724-77); Lt John R. Litton (1726-1804); Bvt BrigGen/Col Wm W. Russell (1735-93) 5th VA Rgmt; Lt James Scott (1736-1817); Capt John Murray, Sr (1747-1833); Capt John Sehorn, Sr (1748-1831) VA Mil; Pvt Corbin Lane (1750-1816) Franklin/TN Mil; Cpl Jesse D. Reynolds (1750-1836) 5th VA Rgmt; Capt. Solomon C. Litton (1751-1844); 1Lt Christopher Casey (1754-1840) SC Mil; Pvt Mark Adams (1755-1828); Pvt Randolph White (1755-1831) Bailey's Co. VA Rgmt; Capt. John R. Russell (1758-1838); Pvt Joseph T. Cooley (1767-1826) Fort Hempstead Mil; Pvt Thomas Barron (1776-1863) 1812; Capt. John Baumgardner (1787-1853) VA Mil; Pvt Joel Estep (1828-1864) Co B 5th KY Inf CSA & US; Pvt George B. Bell (1833-1910) Co C 47th IL Inf US; Cpl Daniel H. Barron (1838-1910) Co B 19th TN Rgmt Inf CSA; Capt Richard K. Kaufman (1908-1946) 7th PRG/3rd AF CCU; T-5 Vernon L. Bell (1926-95) 1802nd Spec Rgmt; PO2 Murray J. Heichman (1932-2019) HQSB/MCRD; PFC Jess Long (1934-2017) US Army; PFC Donald W. Johnson (1931-) 43rd ID HQ; A1C Keith W. Bell (1931-2011) 314th TCW; A3C Michael S. Bell (1946-) 3346th CMS; A1C Sam W. Lee (1954-2017) 2d BW; AW3 Keith J. Price (1975-) VP-10; 1Lt Matthew Wm Bell (1985-) 82nd Abn/SOC








Link to post
Share on other sites

I would take it to a blueprint maker and have it copied.They have the large machines to make the copies. Then I would display the copies and put the original away to prevent any future damage.A good clean copy would display as well as the original with only a hint of the creases.

Good luck.

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can usually relax folded paper simply by placing it on a rack (like the one my wife uses in the kitchen to cool hot baked goods on), in the presence of humidity (aka gentle steam) inside an enclosed container (such as a plastic storage tub of the correct size). Don't spray water directly on the paper. All you want to do is introduce some moisture back to the paper fibers over a period of time.

 

I usually used a baking pan of hot water in the bottom of the container, with the rack on top of that, and the lid on.

 

Just leave it in there awhile (a few hours or a day or so) and then bring it out and put it under a piece of glass or plexi (one that fits side to side top to bottom of the paper) with some weight on top. Repeat as or if needed.

 

In most cases (I've even done this with rolled up yard-longs!) that process will take care of the average problem as well as can be done without spending possibly in the hundred$ to have a conservator do pretty much the exact same thing.

 

Bluehawk's method is probably best. I have done a similar process with an iron on low and using the steam function, keeping the document protected with another cloth or paper item. It's enough to introduce some humidity to and allow the fibers to be pliable again. I then put it on a flat surface with a flat item on top and stack weight (books, etc) on that. I've done this mainly with photographs. This unrolls and unwrinkles and can disguise creases.

 

Rob

Exhausting & Dirty Work



Interested in buying identified or re-searchable Korean War uniforms, groupings, medals and more.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.