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Annual gun show hand cart display


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The carts seen in the Hawaiian image are these.

 

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Thanks again for the drawing and outstanding photos of the M1 hand cart

 

Question: Also a M1 handcart? Kaneohe Bay Naval Air Station 1941, USN Medical team

Kaneohe Bay 12081941 008 wm.jpg

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No not an M1, potentially a locally fabricated wheeled cart and possibly those are radio cabinets. Some form of a field communication system.

If medical personnel then those are medical trunks

 

Thanks,

 

USN Medical personnel attached to the defense battalion just after the Pearl Harbor attack

Kaneohe Bay 12081941 002a wm.jpg

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The carts with slat sides are the earlier production aluminum models. In mid 1943 the specifications switched to steel bodies. Those are what you see as solid sided carts.

donation2017.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

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As far as the Navy use of carts is concerned, they had their own design called Cole Carts. Some what more "dainty" looking that the Army carts. And as far as I know, no Cole carts have turned up yet.

donation2017.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

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As far as the Navy use of carts is concerned, they had their own design called Cole Carts. Some what more "dainty" looking that the Army carts. And as far as I know, no Cole carts have turned up yet.

 

Thanks for the info Robin,

 

I found this 2017 online article that mentioned the Cole cart https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2017/7/31/guns-of-the-devil-dogs-us-marine-corps-small-arms-of-world-war-i/

 

In 1916, (at the urging of Edward B. Cole, the “father” of Marine Corps machine guns) the U.S. Navy decided to adopt the Lewis light machine gun, which was then being manufactured for the British by the Savage Arms Co. in Utica, N.Y. An American invention, but produced and used overseas because of a long-standing feud between its inventor, Col. Isaac N. Lewis, and Gen. William Crozier, the U.S. Army’s Chief of Ordnance, the new American version of the bipod-mounted, shoulder-fired machine gun was, like the ’03 Springfield rifle, chambered in .30-’06 Sprg. Firing 47 rounds out of its distinctive top-mounted drum magazine, the air-cooled Lewis gun quickly became a favorite of Marines training at Quantico, and handcarts were developed (again by Cole) to carry the guns into battle.......

.....Thankfully, the introduction of the famous Browning M1917 .30-cal. machine gun (that the 4th Brigade received just after the Armistice), paved the way for man-powered machine gun carts, again based on Cole’s original design.

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