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McDermut99

Opinions on WWII fighting knife made from M1 bayonet

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This is my most recent knife acquisition. It looks to be a WWII M1 bayonet cut down to a fighting knife. I haven’t found any markings on the knife, and the blade measures 6 11/16in. The sheath has no markings except a last name on the front and what looks to be “June 1944” written on the back. I’ve found a couple similar examples of this style of cut down online so I’m wondering if this is pretty typical of M1 bayonets converted into fighting knives.

 

Any comments are greatly appreciated!

 

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Interested in items related to:

-Amarillo A.A.F. / Amarillo Air Force Base

-Military instillations located in the Texas Panhandle, South Plains, and West Texas.

-"F" Company, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)

-413th Civil Affairs Battalion (USAR)

donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gif

In Memoriam:

CSM Juan H. Hernandez - U.S. Army WWII, Korea, Vietnam

RM1c William C. Denney - U.S.S. McDermut (DD-677) Korea

 

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Interested in items related to:

-Amarillo A.A.F. / Amarillo Air Force Base

-Military instillations located in the Texas Panhandle, South Plains, and West Texas.

-"F" Company, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)

-413th Civil Affairs Battalion (USAR)

donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gif

In Memoriam:

CSM Juan H. Hernandez - U.S. Army WWII, Korea, Vietnam

RM1c William C. Denney - U.S.S. McDermut (DD-677) Korea

 

Share this post


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Posted Image

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Interested in items related to:

-Amarillo A.A.F. / Amarillo Air Force Base

-Military instillations located in the Texas Panhandle, South Plains, and West Texas.

-"F" Company, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)

-413th Civil Affairs Battalion (USAR)

donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gif

In Memoriam:

CSM Juan H. Hernandez - U.S. Army WWII, Korea, Vietnam

RM1c William C. Denney - U.S.S. McDermut (DD-677) Korea

 

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McDermut99- These were made from left overs, or rejected parts. UTICA was known to make these from parts or rejects, producing them under the "KUTMASTER" name. This also could have been made by someone in uniform. I had a crappy Korean cut down M1 that I ground down a little to make one for me. But, with this one the scabbard looks like the ones I've seen with the Kutmasters, and just about any other knife made from parts in WW2. Years ago I had a SGM I served with who carried his Dad's "KUTMASTER" from WW2. Hard to tell who made it w'o a makers name stamped on the blade. SKIP

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Is it possible that these knives were produced during WWII instead of just post-war? I have one direct from a family member who fought in WWII. His scabbard is named and the wear on the scabbard matches the knife in which it came in when I received it. I wonder if its possible that he bought it private party and placed it in his scabbard? Does anyone have legit document proof stating that these were ONLY produced post-war? Or is this an assumption? Thanks!

 

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As far as I've read they were produced during WW2 as well as post war. As I stated a little earlier, my SGM carried his Dad's WW2 Kutmaster. I do suspect that these were PX / commercial knives, and probably not issued. But, who knows? SKIP

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As I recall, the Kutmaster marked knives made from M1 bayonets were post-war builds, probably around 46-47. However, other knives from M1 bayonets could have been made in WW2 from broken bayonets or just because. I have had several of these, kept two that were made from Wilde Tool bayonets. Also, if you take off the grips and look on the underside of the guard, you may see the manufacturer's name. The Wilde Tool marked their bayonet guards (WT) on the upper side, others marked theirs on the bottom so you can only see them when the grips are removed.


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Good point about he grips being removed, could reveal a lot. SKIP

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I bought this one years ago for the grips and internals. Its grown on me since so now Im looking for grips!

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Item posted was made from a PAL bayonet. The "notch outs"on the back of the crossguard are PAL production distinct. Also, the oval guard is distinct to PAL production on the "bayonet knives" and their bayonet prodution. IE; I can spot a PAL bayonet w/o picking it up just by the "notch outs
". A PAL spear-point is typical. Possibly postwar surplus parts or war production rejects. That style sheath also shows up on PAL products with some regularity.

 

It is a very nice example of PAL "bayonet" knife

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