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Pineapple Army DUI of the Interwar Hawaiian Division 1922-1941

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74th Ordnance Company (Depot) June 1, 1913–June 30, 1939 - There had been an Ordnance organization in Hawaii since 1913, when a depot was sent out from Benicia Arsenal in California to Fort Kamehameha on the southern coast of Oahu. During World War I, the Hawaiian Ordnance Depot was moved to Fort Shafter, near Honolulu, and a few years later it also had a maintenance company and a depot detachment at Schofield Barracks in the interior.

Hawaii Arsenal (1915) Fort Shafter - First established as Hawaii Ordnance Depot in 1915 adjacent to Fort Shafter in Honolulu County, Hawaii. Renamed Hawaii Arsenal on 17 Sep 1918. The arsenal was designed as a storage and repair facility for coastal defense armament and normal small arms equipment.

The arsenal was laid out as an equilateral triangle with a crescent added to the base. Inside the triangle the arsenal buildings formed three rows with additional buildings lining the two sides (See Photo Below). The crescent at the base of the triangle was lined with the arsenal's quarters including the Commanding officer's quarters, his assistant officer's quarters, NCO quarters, Barracks, a stable and a garage.
The arsenal buildings that filled in the triangle included:
Supply storehouse 50' x 190'
Four storehouses 50' x 100'
Five magazines 50' x 100'
Six gun sheds 30' x 100'
Lumber shed 30' x 100'
Machine shop 32' x 190'
Saddler shop 32' x 100'
A rail spur from the Oahu Railway and Land Co. provided access to the storehouses and ammunition magazines from the port of Honolulu wharves (Fort Armstrong) and Fort Kamehameha at the entrance to Pearl Harbor. Some buildings remain repurposed on the Fort Shafter post.

 

Ft_Shafter_B18312_019 Ordnance Depot 1938 001b.jpg

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74th Ordnance Company (Depot) June 1, 1913–June 30, 1939 Aliamanu Crater (Fort Shafter) - Hawaiian Ordnance Depot, T.H.

 

Constituted 25 January 1921 in the Regular Army as the 74th Ordnance Company
Activated 5 April 1921 in the Territory of Hawaii
Reorganized and redesignated 26 December 1942 as the 74th Ordnance Depot Company
Reorganized and redesignated 10 May 1944 as the 74th Ordnance Base Depot Company
Inactivated 31 December 1949 in the Territory of Hawaii

 

Design approved November 21, 1939 - N.S. Meyer Screwback

 

Crimson and Yellow (Gold) are colors for Ordnance. The spur gear and projectile symbolize storage, repair and other activities of the organization.

 

Motto: PARATUS ET VERSATILES - Prepared and Versatile

74th Ordnance Company (Depot) DUI 000.jpg

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11th Field Artillery Brigade - Hawaiian Division

 

The organizations constituting the Brigade are the 8th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Field Artillery (155-mm. howitzers). the 13th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Ammunition Train and Brigade Headquarters Battery.
In 1921 all the organizations of the Brigade were completely motorized.

11th Field Artillery Brigade DUI 001.jpg

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11th Field Artillery Brigade - Hawaiian Division



The organizations constituting the Brigade are the 8th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Field Artillery (155-mm. howitzers). the 13th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Ammunition Train and Brigade Headquarters Battery.

In 1921 all the organizations of the Brigade were completely motorized.

11th Field Artillery Brigade 003.jpg

11th Field Artillery Brigade 004.jpg

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11th Field Artillery Brigade - Hawaiian Division



The organizations constituting the Brigade are the 8th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Field Artillery (155-mm. howitzers). the 13th Field Artillery (75-mm. Br.), the 11th Ammunition Train and Brigade Headquarters Battery.

In 1921 all the organizations of the Brigade were completely motorized.

11th Field Artillery Brigade 002.jpg

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11th Ammunition Train - 11th Artillery Brigade, Hawaiian Division

 

Organized August 1918 at Camp Meade, Md. Assigned to establish the Hawaiian Division with the other brigade, medical and headquarters assets of the 11th Infantry Division.

 

Screwback DUI, no hall mark

11th Ammunition Train DUI 001.jpg

11th Ammunition Train DUI 002.jpg

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3rd Engineer Regiment - Hawaiian Division

ASMIC 3A1 3RD ENGR REGT

RA-HAW DIV

On a tr red shield the Roman numeral III within an indented border, both white. The crest is a tr brown couchant beaver at the foot of an op light green palm branch, both on a white & red wreath. (32x19) S/P; AHD, NSM, URS

Auth. 9Feb24, Appr 9Feb24, Redes 11Mar42-3rd Engr Bn

Note: -Op v. tr brown beaver (32x19) PB: NSM (A/a)

 

3rd Engineer Regiment, The Beavers, assigned to Hawaii in 1921 they designed and built most of the permanent forts and military installations on Oahu.

 

All N.S. Meyer, screwback and pinback

 

3rd Engineers Felt patch circa 1930's

3rd Engineer 001.jpg

3rd Engineers 001.jpg

3rd Engineers 002.jpg

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The Brass in Hawaiian Territory 1923 - Left to Right

 

Major General Charles P. Summerall commanding the Hawaiian Department

Brigadier General Joseph F. Kuhn commanding the Hawaiian Division

Brigadier General John Barrette commanding the Hawaiian Coast Artillery District

HD HQ 1923 001.jpg

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74th Ordnance Company (Depot) June 1, 1913–June 30, 1939 Aliamanu Crater (Fort Shafter) - Hawaiian Ordnance Depot, T.H.



Constituted 25 January 1921 in the Regular Army as the 74th Ordnance Company

Activated 5 April 1921 in the Territory of Hawaii

Reorganized and redesignated 26 December 1942 as the 74th Ordnance Depot Company

Reorganized and redesignated 10 May 1944 as the 74th Ordnance Base Depot Company

Inactivated 31 December 1949 in the Territory of Hawaii


Design approved November 21, 1939 - N.S. Meyer Screwback



Crimson and Yellow (Gold) are colors for Ordnance. The spur gear and projectile symbolize storage, repair and other activities of the organization.



Motto: PARATUS ET VERSATILES - Prepared and Versatile



74th Ordnance Company (Depot) Matched set made by N.S. Meyer


74th Ordnance Company (Depot) DUI 004.jpg

74th Ordnance Company (Depot) DUI 005.jpg

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22nd Infantry Brigade - Hawaiian Division

ASMIC 22G 22ND INFANTRY BRIGADE (A)

A pointed oval , long axis horizontal, divided per bend black and white ; on a black gold wolf's head and on the white a dark green giant cactus; overa-all a gold scroll inscribed "KUDO-MAKAALA" (Fearless - Take Arms) in black letters. (20x34mm) N.S. Meyer, Inc. Authorized 30 July 1937, samples approved May 1938 rescinded 19 Aug 1975

 

All made by N.S. Meyer, (3) screwback, (1) pinback

22nd Infantry Brigade 001.jpg

22nd Infantry Brigade 002.jpg

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251st Coast Artillery Regiment (Harbor Defense) California NG "We Aim to Hit", Stationed at Camp Malakole during the Pearl Harbor Attack
Insignia authorized 1928, approved 1928
Organized as 251st CA (HD) Regt, CA NG in November 1924 from elements of the 250th CA (TD) Regt, CA NG in San Diego and Los Angeles area of CA Redesignated 250th CA (AA) Regt 1-1-30.
Inducted into federal service 9-16-40 at San Diego, CA and moved to Ventura, CA 9-22-40. On 11-17-40 regt moved to Cp Anza, CA and departed same date via Los Angeles POE for Honolulu, TH where arrived by 11-23-40.
Posted at Ft Shafter until 1-27-41 when moved to Cp Malakole, TH where assigned to the AA defense of Pearl Harbor. Posted at Cp Malakole until 5-22-42 when transferred to Fiji Is. arriving there 6-1-42. Moved to Guadalcanal, Solomon Is. 11-23-43. Moved to Torokina, Bougainville Is. 12-4-43 where inactivated and elements redesignated: HHB redesignated 251st AAA Grp; 1st Bn redesignated 746th AAA(Gun) Bn; 2nd Bn redesignated 951st AAA(AW) Bn and 3rd Bn disbanded.
The First Casualties in the Attack on Pearl Harbor
Battery F, 251st Coast Artillery Regiment
Sergeant Henry C. Blackwell
Corporal Clyde C. Brown
Sergeant Warren D. Rasmussen
The 251st was on full war alert on Saturday, December 6, 1941 but were told that the Japanese fleet was spotted off Taiwan. They were then given Sunday off, so while some slept in that morning, three soldiers got up early and went to John Rodgers field and rented two Piper Cubs airplanes. They were licensed pilots and took off along the Ewa Coast to practice their flying skills.
They ran directly into attacking Zeros and were shot down, becoming the first American casualties of the Pearl Harbor attack.
Shield Shaped Screwback unmarked maker, Robbins Co. Screwback and unmarked maker Screwback

 

251st Coast Artillery Regiment 003.jpg

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The Malakole Saga
The following article, quoted in its entirety, appeared in the Honolulu Advertiser on January 21, 1941 under the title of "The Saga of the 251st C.A.":
"This is the interesting account of the wandering of Southern California's own Coast Artillery Regiment during the year 1940. With these figures, the regiment makes its bid for the title of the most "Travelingest Regiment in the United States Army".
From January 14th to the 24th, this Regiment participated in the Army-Navy joint maneuvers in the San Francisco-Monterey area covering a distance of approximately 1400 miles by truck. On this occasion, the Regiment was honored by being one of the two National guard units participating.
On August 3rd, the Regiment entrained for an extended Annual Field Training Encampment of three weeks at Chehalis, Washington. This involved a trip by train of about 3000 miles for the round trip. While in Washington, the Regiment was very active in the Fourth Field Army Maneuvers and added at least 300 miles to the total of miles covered under orders.
The Day-of-Days dawned on September 16th (1940), on a life that the citizen-soldiers never thought would come to them. Uncomplainingly and cheerfully, they answered the call of their President and Country. They left their homes, their loved ones, their jobs, their classrooms, to obey the order that was to add to their already impressive total. One hundred and ninety miles bought them from their home stations in San Diego, Long Beach and San Pedro to their training camp at Ventura. There they entered Army life eager to learn and do their part to keep the American flag the symbol of peace on earth.
During the first part of November; the Regiment started on the voyage to Hawaii. On the 17th of November, the last of the Regiment left its native soil by way of San Pedro and added 2345 miles by the time it arrived at Fort Shafter in Honolulu on the island of Oahu. The next stop was a short move to its new home in a kiawe grove 25 miles from Ft. Shafter Here, the men fell-to with a will to clear away the tenacious kiawe or algaroba as it is called on the mainland. The men were building their own quarters amid the hardships of inadequate toilet and water facilities with little complaint. These sons of California are proud to uphold the tradition of a proud Regiment whose motto is"We Aim to Hit".
The mileage covered by the end of the year totalled 7260 miles and was done in 138 days of service. This was an average of 52.6 miles for each day of service under Federal orders. If this mileage was computed at five-cents per mile and given to a man, he would have $363.00 in his pocket and would still be at home with his loved ones instead of working for a dollar a day and leading a monastic life on this barren kiawe infested coral reef.
Of course, all this travel and expense is necessary .to properly train the Regiment to be an efficient unit of anti-aircraft defense. However; a careful check finds that the Regiment has spent since entering Federal Service last September the enormous total of 18 days in Infantry Drill. The rest of the time has been spent in making camps and moving.
When duty calls and America needs defense from enemy aircraft, this Regiment will gallantly defend with hammers, saws and squares to the last nail and stick of lumber for "We Aim to Hit".

251st CAC Robbins Co Screwback & Unmarked maker Screwback

251st Coast Artillery Regiment 001.jpg

251st Coast Artillery Regiment 002.jpg

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Aloha! Superb!

 

Spent my 12 - 15 year old life roaming the various mil bases on Oahu ( 1950 -53). Wonderful years! Yes a Air Force Brat in those days! Hey the ANG was flying F-47's. Watched some segments of " FROM HERE TO ETERNITY" being

 

filmed. Drat missed the beach scene!

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Pearl Harbor, December 7th, 1941
While the "Malakole Saga" article portrays some of the frustrations, it does not depict the high level of morale nor the outstanding record achieved by the 251st Regiment in direct competition with regular army troops during periods of field testing within the Hawaiian Department.
During daily training and firing on Oahu, the Regiment received its quota of draftees bringing it to full strength level of 2400 troops.
As the potential of an impending conflict became increasingly clear; the Regiment was ordered on full alert in the field whenever sight of the Japanese Fleet was lost. Batteries of the Regiment were assigned defensive positions around the west shore of Pearl Harbor and the perimeter of Schofield Barracks, providing an anti-aircraft defense coordinated with the Navy and other Army units.
However, on December 7th, 1941, the day of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; all carefully rehearsed procedures were of no avail.- the Regiment was at Camp Malakole having just returned from a full alert in the field. After the standard Saturday morning inspection, half of the Regiment on that infamous Sunday were either sleeping or away form the Camp on weekend pass. Even so, the Regiment is officially credited with downing two enemy aircraft.

 

251st Coast Artillery Regiment - We Aim To Hit Shield Shaped Screwback, no makers mark

251st Coast Artillery Regiment 004.jpg

251st Coast Artillery Regiment 005.jpg

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SS,

Fantastic and very informative posting. A few weeks ago I obtained a grouping of DIs from the son of a Coast Artillery Officer who was stationed in Hawaii in the 30s. I did not get the DIs directly from the son, but a picker who bought them at a yard sale about 20 years ago.Obviously the son collected them as to the mix of units. Anyway was able to id most of them from Your article or backtracking CAC units. Here a quick pic of the lot, most are screw back with some pin backs. Dont collect DIs but at 2 bucks each,could not pass em up.

Thanks Again,

Rick

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post-10493-0-91947900-1585159471_thumb.jpg


donation2010.gif

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SS,

Really neat DUI collection. I was curious if you had any more information or close ups of that Hawaii Air Force org chart you posted. Specifically, anything on the 86th Observation Squadron. I was in the 43rd Electronic Combat Squadron (which holds the lineage and history of the 86th) and I have never seen the insignia that was in that chart. I was the squadron historian and we never had much luck researching the squadrons prewar or WWII insignia even though the squadrons history reaches back to the 86th Aero in WWI. Any info or pictures you might have would be greatly appreciated! Thanks and stay healthy.

 

Sincerely,

 

Friar

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