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Chemical/vinegar smell from painted trench art

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Hey guys. I was in a flood prone area during hurricane season this year and put a lot of my things inside ziplock bags.

Just took out a piece I had yesterday (a hand painted bakelite/plastic composite plan recognition model) and it smelled strongly of vinegar or possibly some other chemical smell.

 

Is there any reason to be concerned? Doesn't look like there is any damage, but I'm concerned keeping this piece mostly air tight might have caused damage. It was a very strong smell when opening the bag.

 

Thinking maybe just the plastic used or the paint had a smell that I didn't realize before until it was cooped up.

Just curious if you guys have any thoughts. Thanks!

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I had several recognition models in the past and a long-time collector informed me that if they smell like vinegar, they are beginning to decompose. The materials used in making the models have that smell when they deteriorate. The collector later shared photos of one that he spray painted to halt the decomposition.

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I had several recognition models in the past and a long-time collector informed me that if they smell like vinegar, they are beginning to decompose. The materials used in making the models have that smell when they deteriorate. The collector later shared photos of one that he spray painted to halt the decomposition.

 

That's really unfortunate to hear. Could putting them in a sealed bag caused this? It has always been in a condition (temperature and humidity) environment.

 

This recognition model is hand-painted with all kinds of unique pinups and trench art so there is no practical way I could paint it. I would eve be pretty scared to use a clear coat.

 

Does anyone know of any other ways to preserve this piece?

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I buy and sell old movie films and often when I open a film can I get a nose full of fumes, "...nitrate films and acetate films suffering from the so called 'vinegar syndrome'."

 

Perhaps some techniques used to stabilize film might help with these models.

 

Here's where that quote came from - : https://www.scart.be/?q=en/content/short-guide-identify-nitrate-films-and-vinegar-syndrome-degradation-audio-visual-collections



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As suspected, some recognition models were made from cellulose actetate, same as film. I don't know if there a stabilizer, but the storage recommendations for film should apple to these models.



donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

donation2019.gif

 

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As suspected, some recognition models were made from cellulose actetate, same as film. I don't know if there a stabilizer, but the storage recommendations for film should apple to these models.

 

 

Thanks for the information! I will definitely look into this more

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