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Reproducing WW2 Field Gear?


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I know that At The Front uses a combination of old and modern equipment to manufacture what they can. So to answer your question, a majority of the required equipment and tools would be modern, but I'm sure there is specific period equipment needed in order to properly reproduce field gear.

 

I'd encourage you to sign up to ATF's emails, not only is there a bit of humorous quips, but he sometimes explains some of the process of producing certain pieces of gear. Usually because they get bombarded with downright stupid questions and complaints.

 

(FYI, not a promotion of ATF, simply providing a source of insight into how WWII gear is reproduced.)

Interested in items related to:

-Amarillo A.A.F. / Amarillo Air Force Base

-Military instillations located in the Texas Panhandle, South Plains, and West Texas.

-"F" Company, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)

-413th Civil Affairs Battalion (USAR)

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In Memoriam:

CSM Juan H. Hernandez - U.S. Army WWII, Korea, Vietnam

RM1c William C. Denney - U.S.S. McDermut (DD-677) Korea

 

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I know that At The Front uses a combination of old and modern equipment to manufacture what they can. So to answer your question, a majority of the required equipment and tools would be modern, but I'm sure there is specific period equipment needed in order to properly reproduce field gear.

 

I'd encourage you to sign up to ATF's emails, not only is there a bit of humorous quips, but he sometimes explains some of the process of producing certain pieces of gear. Usually because they get bombarded with downright stupid questions and complaints.

 

(FYI, not a promotion of ATF, simply providing a source of insight into how WWII gear is reproduced.)

 

Thank you. I got myself signed up right away. I also looked up their website on thewaybackmachine and found a few pictures of their workspace (back in the day, I assume they have expanded by now) and they were using modern sewing machines.

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It all depends on what type of gear you want to make. Most of the cheap made-in-China junk that floats around is built with modern equipment and similar, but not exact parts. There are indeed variations between various machines and how they operate and how it looks in the finished product. We use a number of period WWII machines. We also have a large amount of tooling, jigs, and fixtures custom made because certain WWII items are no longer in existence and there is no modern substitute. Just about every modern tool we have has been modified in at least one way.

 

It's the same with materials. If you want the best reproduction, you have to find the original WWII dated specifications and have them custom manufactured. In your other topic you mentioned HTC Reproductions materials. They like to throw around specification numbers and technical jargon, but that doesn't mean they always know what they are talking about. For example the MIL-SPEC system HTC likes to mention every other paragraph was not even adopted until after WWII. Modern MIL-Spec materials are very close - but not always identical.

 

If you want to do it right, it takes an insane amount of research and work. I have spent literally thousands of hours researching and locating the original blueprints, amendment specs, technical orders, contract lists etc. We've even researched the tooling patents filed during the war in order to rebuild the tools various companies designed to make this stuff, as well as some of the lawsuits filed between the various manufacturing companies. Not to mention tens of thousands of dollars invested materials, machines, etc. In short - it isn't quite as simple as it may seem, and there isn't any shortcut to loads of research.

www.theriggerdepot.com - Replica WWII Parachute Gear

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It all depends on what type of gear you want to make. Most of the cheap made-in-China junk that floats around is built with modern equipment and similar, but not exact parts. There are indeed variations between various machines and how they operate and how it looks in the finished product. We use a number of period WWII machines. We also have a large amount of tooling, jigs, and fixtures custom made because certain WWII items are no longer in existence and there is no modern substitute. Just about every modern tool we have has been modified in at least one way.

 

It's the same with materials. If you want the best reproduction, you have to find the original WWII dated specifications and have them custom manufactured. In your other topic you mentioned HTC Reproductions materials. They like to throw around specification numbers and technical jargon, but that doesn't mean they always know what they are talking about. For example the MIL-SPEC system HTC likes to mention every other paragraph was not even adopted until after WWII. Modern MIL-Spec materials are very close - but not always identical.

 

If you want to do it right, it takes an insane amount of research and work. I have spent literally thousands of hours researching and locating the original blueprints, amendment specs, technical orders, contract lists etc. We've even researched the tooling patents filed during the war in order to rebuild the tools various companies designed to make this stuff, as well as some of the lawsuits filed between the various manufacturing companies. Not to mention tens of thousands of dollars invested materials, machines, etc. In short - it isn't quite as simple as it may seem, and there isn't any shortcut to loads of research.

Would original patterns or construction drawings and the like be available somewhere online or somewhere like Philadelphia or a National archive? (Looking for resources on basic canvas equipment like haversacks, cartridge belts, or canteen covers)

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Some of the drawings are available. My question is why bother at this point. You would be hard pressed to find a standard piece of web gear from WWII that isn't reproduced by numerous companies. Some garbage. Some great.

Without data, your just another person with an opinion...................

 

Selling DVDs of Ordnance Drawings on ebay seller ID 245thcac
Original Research from Museums and The National Archives
1912 Cavalry Board Report, 1910 Infantry Board Report, Equipment Blueprints and Drawing, Coast Artillery Training Films and 1897 Specifications for Clothing
CHECK THEM OUT

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Some of the drawings are available. My question is why bother at this point. You would be hard pressed to find a standard piece of web gear from WWII that isn't reproduced by numerous companies. Some garbage. Some great.

 

The point isn't really to make it for the sake of reenacting and historical accuracy. It more for a hobby than anything else.

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