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In studying P1915 packs lately, I've noticed an intriguing detail in their depot stamps. Most examples feature the typical sans-serif block lettering found on almost all depot field gear produced during the interwar period, which is easily identifiable by the "squashed" letter S in which the two ends are nearly touching the letter's middle. This style can be seen below:

 

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(Last photo courtesy of Keystone.)

 

On a few P1915 packs I've seen, however, the font is slightly different, with the S being less compact and thereby having a slightly greater distance between the tail ends and the letter's middle. This is a phenomenon I have observed only among P1915 packs, including my own. Here are some examples:

 

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(Courtesy of user USMCman01)

 

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(My own pack)

 

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(From Equipping the Corps)

 

I hope these latter examples are simply cases of the depot's infamous lack of consistency rather than the work of a frighteningly good faker who overlooked a minor detail, though it's possible I'm being far too analytical.

 

Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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Heh- good eye, Jake! I just took a peek at my M1910 Canteens, and both variants of the "S" are there.

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Now that you mention it, 'Flage, I do see a difference between the stamps of the two middle covers you posted. I guess the "taller" S goes beyond P1915 packs after all. Just another depot quirk, I suppose.

Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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Just another depot quirk, I suppose.

 

LOL- Yeah, I think that's about the most plausible explanation! That squatty "S" seems to get around on old Marine Corps stuff, though...

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Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Made at the Depot but not worn! Haven't bumped into too many of these over the years. Not a lot of data in them as it was wartime so they weren't putting out in the public what so much they were doing. Still kind of interesting item. Hope you find it interesting.

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A1C Matthew Seidler, Delta Company, 466th EOD killed in action. 05 Jan 12 at 1600L while conducting mounted route clearance patrols in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He turned 24 two days before his death. Cousin, Soldier, Hero.

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  • 1 month later...

Recently I've made an interesting discovery (it was new to me, at least) regarding the first model of dispatch case manufactured by the Depot around World War One, an example of which I shared in post no. 20 of this topic. I initially thought only one pattern of this case was produced, but it appears there were actually two.

 

The example I own is the only one of these depot-made cases I have handled in person. I have come across photographs, however, of what I believe to be an earlier production run of the case in my collection (assuming the trend of simplification in field gear design throughout WWI and WWII holds true with these particular cases). Here are photos of such a case pulled from a listing currently on eBay:

 

WWI-M1914-%E2%80%9CUSMC-Phila-Depot%E2%8

 

WWI-M1914-USMC-Phila-Depot-Stamped-Dispa

 

WWI-M1914-USMC-Phila-Depot-Stamped-Dispa

 

 

Note the presence of a red grid overlay on the clear acetate window, a web-tape securing strap with dome snap at the bottom of the case, and the "PHILA. DEPOT" stamp beneath the typical USMC block letters.

 

Several years ago user MCDUFF posted a case of the same production run, as evident in the identical grid overlay and web-tape securing strap:

 

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Now, here is the example in my collection. There is no grid overlay, no bottom securing strap, and the stamp only reads, "U.S.M.C.," leading me to believe it is the product of a second production run which saw the removal of these features for quicker, less expensive manufacture:

 

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It seems, therefore, that USMC dispatch cases followed this progression: Mills-made, Depot-made first-pattern (first run), Depot-made 1st-pattern (second run), Depot-made 2nd-pattern (first run), Depot-made 2nd-pattern (second run), and the M1938 produced by private manufacturing companies, most notably Boyt.

Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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Jake- these styles were made up until the new style was developed in the 1939/40 time period. I believe it is modeled after the Army map case. See image attached.

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A1C Matthew Seidler, Delta Company, 466th EOD killed in action. 05 Jan 12 at 1600L while conducting mounted route clearance patrols in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He turned 24 two days before his death. Cousin, Soldier, Hero.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have two canteen covers that are specific to the Marines. The one on the left with the cross-over flaps I've had for some time, and it has a blue enamel canteen inside (not original, I set it up that way). The one on the right I picked up this weekend at an antique fair; it came with a 1943 dated canteen and cup. I'm not sure what the nomenclatures are, but I think the one on the right is a M1941? Spent $40 on it, not sure if that was a good buy.

 

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$40.00??!!?? You stole that Canteen rig B) The Cover alone is worth a lot more than that!

Well done!

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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  • 3 weeks later...

Took a little time this afternoon to "rig up" some Depot gear onto a mannequin. It's meant to portray a 1st Division machine gunner on Guadalcanal. The Depot-made items are the first aid pouch, .45 magazine pouch, D-ring haversack, flat buckle suspenders, shovel cover, and P1912 canteen cover.

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Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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Jake, that is one nice display; all that 782, with the Summer Shirt, is just Primo!!

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Great additions!

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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Thanks to the extraordinary generosity of a fellow forum member, I recently received a rare WWII-era Depot-made M1932 meat can. Originally manufactured with a stamped metal hinge held in place by three rivets, the Philadelphia Depot meat can underwent a simplification of design in 1940 which saw the deletion of the third rivet. This example is thus a post-1940 manufacture. As are all Depot-made meat cans, it is devoid of any manufacturer's stamp.

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Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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  • 1 month later...

Very nice! I have never been able to acquire one of the DQP meat cans, still on the 'wanted' list for me.

 

Regards,

Steve

 

I didn't even know they existed!!! :wacko:

 

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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