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Share Your USMC Depot-Made Field Gear


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Raul, thanks for showing all that fine stuff- that group of Dressing Pouches is unreal :o

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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41bd79f8612a121e190c003f84c9b984.jpg

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

:P :P :P

 

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Last one, still have this one: (Sorry about the color difference between the first two--just an editing error)

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Does anyone know if these were in fact made at Phila. Depot? I have heard that they were from one source only.

WW1 American items donations always appreciated!

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GWS, that Belt and Canteen Cover leave me speechless...

Support our troops...abandoning the War on Terror is not an affordable luxury.

I'm so old, I still call W.W.II U.S. militaria "war surplus".

 

God's blessings in the Name of our Lord Jesus- Jim Robertson

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Thanks for the comments guys. I don't think it was ever issued. I guess the belt doesn't actually fit the depot made gear title---but I couldn't resist!

WW1 American items donations always appreciated!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just picked up this Meat Can frying pan today for around $17 and I think it was made by the Marine Corps Philadelphia Depot of Supplies. I added the segmented aluminum plate from an M1932 Meat Can I already had, as this would be the correct for a marine corps meat can. If I’m incorrect in this identification, please let me know!

 

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Last one, still have this one: (Sorry about the color difference between the first two--just an editing error)

attachicon.gifDSCN0964-1.JPG

attachicon.gifDSCN0966-1.JPG

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Does anyone know if these were in fact made at Phila. Depot? I have heard that they were from one source only.

 

Hi GWS,

 

I've always wondered the same! Here is a photo of a marine in Shanghai in 1937 who appears to be sitting next to a Springfield scabbard with a side seam.

 

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In this photo of marines in Shanghai in 1937, you can see the top of the scabbard on the lefthand marine, which shows the web belt hook sewn to the scabbard with an extra flap of material (like your scabbard).

 

https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/group-of-american-marines-nearing-the-docks-of-shanghai-news-photo/105212176

 

This last picture shows a Marine in china in the interwar years (1937?) and besides having the USMC specific Springfield sling, might have the seamed scabbard. If you look closely at the leather tip, the stitching appears to end where the leather is folded over like on your example, unlike the regular pattern which has stitching all the way around the leather tip.

 

davies2.jpg?w=407&h=660

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Great photos, Sandpebbles. Thanks for sharing. The scabbard in the first one is definitely Depot-made, evidenced in the side seam as you mentioned, though the second is more difficult to tell.

 

As for the meat can, I could be wrong, but I think depot-made examples typically have a more oval-shaped hinge plate with larger rivets. Moreover, the hinge appears to be of cast metal rather than stamped metal, unlike those found on depot cans. Again, I could be wrong. My knowledge of meat cans is rather limited. Hopefully others weigh in.

Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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Great photos, Sandpebbles. Thanks for sharing. The scabbard in the first one is definitely Depot-made, evidenced in the side seam as you mentioned, though the second is more difficult to tell.

 

As for the meat can, I could be wrong, but I think depot-made examples typically have a more oval-shaped hinge plate with larger rivets. Moreover, the hinge appears to be of cast metal rather than stamped metal, unlike those found on depot cans. Again, I could be wrong. My knowledge of meat cans is rather limited. Hopefully others weigh in.

 

Thanks Jake, I hope others weigh in too as I am very interested to know and there is rather limited information on these to be found.

 

I suspect that the hinge plate on the example I posted above is a stamped piece of metal and it lacks the extra support fin seen on the cast hinge plates of both M1910 and M1932 meat cans. The handle is also devoid of any markings or dates. Lastly, the pin holding the handle to the hinge plate is identical to your example posted a while back and unlike any other type I have seen.

 

I have read that DQP meat cans had three or two aluminum rivets, but I have not seen another 3 rivet example. Have you seen a three rivet example and was it more oval-shaped? Information is so scarce and I am appreciative of any details you might know!

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You raise very good points. I had not considered the lack of support fin or the attachment pin. Taking another look at the design change request submitted by the Depot Quartermaster in 1940, I noticed that not only was the removal of the third rivet recommended, the need for a new die press for hinge manufacture was also noted, as the old die had become worn. The request reads, "In the event of these changes being approved, it is requested that authority be granted to manufacture a new die for manufacturing the new type hinge. The die which is used in the manufacture of the present type hinge is worn out. If the above change is not approved it will be necessary to manufacture a new die for the present type hinge with three holes." This makes me consider whether your example is one fitted with a hinge made on the old die press, hence the slightly different shape. It's looking more and more that you indeed have a depot-made meat can.

Looking for USMC depot-made field gear produced between 1917 and 1943.

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You raise very good points. I had not considered the lack of support fin or the attachment pin. Taking another look at the design change request submitted by the Depot Quartermaster in 1940, I noticed that not only was the removal of the third rivet recommended, the need for a new die press for hinge manufacture was also noted, as the old die had become worn. The request reads, "In the event of these changes being approved, it is requested that authority be granted to manufacture a new die for manufacturing the new type hinge. The die which is used in the manufacture of the present type hinge is worn out. If the above change is not approved it will be necessary to manufacture a new die for the present type hinge with three holes." This makes me consider whether your example is one fitted with a hinge made on the old die press, hence the slightly different shape. It's looking more and more that you indeed have a depot-made meat can.

 

Thank you very much for sharing that information Jake! Somebody was telling me that the Depot didn't produce meat cans between 1930-1940/41 but if their die press was worn out in 1940, it would suggest that they were making them in the late 1930s, at least!

 

 

Very interesting about the USMC sling, would anyone have some nice shots of one to compare with regular slings?

 

From what I have read, these Marines Corps Variant slings can be seen in the interwar years through the early 1940s. These slings are made of thicker harness leather in a darker shade, are totally unmarked, have a metal staple on each keeper, and have only four sets of adjustment holes on the shorter strap (only two sets visible when slung). It has been suggested that these slings were made on the West Coast by a saddle maker on a Marine base in the 1920s and 1930s.

 

 

 

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