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USN Hydrofoils, Ships That Fly PCH AGEH PGH PHM

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PHMRON 2 - Patrol Combatant Missile Hydrofoil Squadron Two

 

13 June 1993

All six vessels of Patrol Combatant Missile Hydrofoil Squadron TWO travel in formation en route to Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek, VA for decommissioning. The formation includes the USS Pegasus (PHM 1), USS Hercules (PHM 2), USS Taurus (PHM 3), USS Aquila (PHM 4), USS Aries (PHM 5) and Gemini
U.S. Navy photo DN-ST-93-05725 by PH2 Douglas F. Mooney

 

PHMRON TWO 007.jpg

PHMRON TWO 008.jpg

PHMRON TWO 001.jpg

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AWESOME! SO well put together!

 

Great history!

 

(The guys in dungs take me back!!)


 

 

 

*SEMPER FORTIS*

USN '92-'96 USS GEORGE WASHINGTON CVN-73

HONOR*COURAGE*COMMITMENT

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BOEING MARINE SYSTEMS - USN PCH/PGH/PHM Contractor Patch & Commissioning Coin (USS ARIES)

 

Navy Awards Boeing $178 Million To Build Missile Firing Boats (Article circa 1981)

Boeing Marine Systems (BMS), Renton, Wash., has announced the signing of a $178-million U.S.
Navy contract for production of five Patrol Hydrofoil Missileships (PHMs). Work will begin immediately on the scheduled five-year program.
Boeing Marine Systems, a division of The Boeing Company, delivered the prototype ship Pegasus (PHM-1) to the Navy for commissioning in July, following successful test and evaluation of this compact weapons system over the last two years.
The Pentagon announced in August that Secretary of Defense Harold Brown had released $272.7 million in previously appropriated funds for the procurement of five more of these high-speed patrol craft. The production program will require a very gradual buildup to about 1,450 additional employees at BMS in Seattle at peak of production in early 1979.
Initial work will focus on engineering and tool design.
During extensive testing by the Navy, Pegasus operated in a wide spectrum of sea conditions, demonstrating capabilities usually afforded only larger ships, while allowing the significantly lower costs and high maneuverability associated with smaller ships.
Boeing's commercial hydrofoil, Jetfoil, exhibited unique seakeeping ability earlier this year on a 7,500-nautical-mile demonstration tour of six northern European countries on the Baltic and North Seas. That tour included the record crossing of the North Sea from Stavanger, Norway, to Aberdeen, Scotland, a distance of 260 nautical miles, in 6 hours 11 minutes.
Both the commercial and military versions of the automatically controlled craft offer the great advantage of a smooth ride in rough water, ensuring passenger comfort and enabling efficient performance of assigned missions.
Both PHM and Jetfoil operate on fully submerged foils.
Capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots, PHM is ideally suited for area surveillance in support of task force operations. Design flexibility in the 131-foot-long, 230-ton hydrofoil includes weight and space reserves to permit expansion of operational roles to antisubmarine (ASW) and antiair warfare (AAW). PHM can be easily adapted for minelaying tasks.
Requiring a crew of only 21, the PHM combines unique seakeeping ability with a compact but powerful weapons system.
Pegasus is equipped with eight Harpoon missiles, a 76-mm dualpurpose gun and MK-94 firecontrol system.
Variation in armament may include ASW, AAW, mine warfare, and use as a helicopter platform.
Standard design permits multinational use.
PHM is also ideal for nonmilitary missions, such as fisheries law enforcement, protection of offshore resources, and search and rescue. BMS is presently conducting a study for the Ministry of Defense of the United Kingdom on a military hydrofoil concept to perform offshore protection missions as set forth in requirements by the Royal Navy.

 

 

Boeing Marine Systems, Renton WA http://shipbuildinghistory.com/shipyards/small/boeing.htm

Boeing Marine Systems 001.jpg

Boeing Marine Systems 002.jpg

PHM 5 USS ARIES 004.jpg

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USS FLAGSTAFF (PGH-1) Flagstaff class patrol gunboat (hydrofoil) built by Grumman Aerospace and commissioned in 1968. She was deployed to South Vietnam with Tucumcari. The two ships formed Coastal Squadron 3, and were based in Cam Ranh Bay conducting patrol missions there until 1970. Flagstaff and Tucumcari were too mechanically complex for the repair facilities in Vietnam, and as a result were ultimately withdrawn from combat.

PGH 1 USS FLAGSTAFF 005.jpg

PGH 1 USS FLAGSTAFF 006.jpg

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USS FLAGSTAFF (PGH-1) Flagstaff class patrol gunboat (hydrofoil) built by Grumman Aerospace and commissioned in 1968. She was deployed to South Vietnam with Tucumcari. The two ships formed Coastal Squadron 3, and were based in Cam Ranh Bay conducting patrol missions there until 1970. Flagstaff and Tucumcari were too mechanically complex for the repair facilities in Vietnam, and as a result were ultimately withdrawn from combat.

PGH 1 USS FLAGSTAFF 012.jpg

PGH 1 USS FLAGSTAFF 011.jpg

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USS High Point (PCH 1), the U.S. Navy’s first operational hydrofoil, was launched in 1962. Operating from the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, she underwent testing at speeds of more than 50 knots.
It was hoped that hydrofoils like High Point would join the fleet as antisubmarine warfare vessels. However, testing revealed that the hydrofoil technology was not yet advanced enough to produce a reliable hydrofoil to join the fleet, and more research was needed. Still, much was learned through these tests. In 1975, High Point was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard for evaluation as a coastal patrol vessel.

 

 

USS HIGH POINT (PCH-1) The Navy's first operational hydrofoil

PCH 1 USS HIGH POINT 005.jpg

PCH 1 USS HIGH POINT 006.jpg

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News Article in Popular Mechanics: The U.S. Navy Has a Secret Hydrofoil Project - The ship was accidentally revealed on YouTube, naturally. By Kyle Mizokami Apr 10, 2019

 

The Navy had better hope loose tweets don't sink ships.
A video inadvertently shared by the U.S. Navy’s research and development arm this week revealed a previously unknown hydrofoil ship. The video, shared by Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, showed the vessel zooming at high speed while riding on foils. The video was taken down shortly afterward, but on April 8, the Twitter account @lfx160219 uploaded the post seen above to Twitter.

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USS PLAINVIEW (AGEH 1) was built by Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company and operated out of the Puget Sound Navy Shipyard from her 1969 commissioning until 1978. At 220’, she was the world’s largest military hydrofoil. She tested the feasibility of large hydrofoil craft operations at sea. Plainview was used to show the effectiveness of hydrofoils in accomplishing Navy missions like launching torpedoes, firing missiles, and underway replenishment.
USS Plainview reminded many crew members of an airplane, with her aluminum construction and Lockheed jet aircraft engines. Her bridge was often compared to an airplane cockpit because of the many dials and gauges.

 

 

Color photograph from my collection, USS PLAINVIEW (AGEH-1) The world's largest military hydrofoil

AGEH 1 USS PLAINVIEW 010.jpg

AGEH 1 USS PLAINVIEW 003.jpg

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