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Post Your Span-Am to WW I Full-Length Soldier Photos


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I have enjoyed this thread so much I have felt compelled to offer my own contribution.

 

I have always liked this image. These guys are Texas National Guardsmen on the Border around 1916. A very eclectic bunch as no two are dressed identically. The weapons are M1903 Springfield Rifles with a few Colt Double Action .38 revolvers with pocketed pistol cartridge belts. There is also what appears to be a Colt Single Action Army in a non-regulation open top holster on the second man from the left.

 

Charlie

 

Colt DA Holsters TX National Guardsmen on Border.JPG

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Erick & Charlie, thanks for adding pic from your collections. It's great to see what kind of "jim-dandy" images others have!

 

Now I'll add a few more of my own, hopefully the new addition will also measure up to the high jim-dandy bar that mike korea set. Thanks for the compliment Mike.

 

I have a number of photos showing troops in the barracks during this time period. This one, of an Indiana National Guard trooper around 1910 is interesting because of the shoe line-up beneath his bunk.

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Beginning in 1905 or 1906, every Army recruit was issued with five different types of shoes … one pair for marching or field duty - one pair for garrison duty - one pair for the dress uniform - one pair for off-duty wear in the barracks - and one pair of athletic or "gym" shoes.

 

Including the pair he's wearing on his feet, this guy has seven pairs of shoes! Of them, the only pair I can recognize with any certainty are the two buckle winter overshoes, on the left under the bed. Two of the other pairs are likely a pair of black dress shoes and a pair of russet garrison shoes, both of which had lacing hooks above the lacing eyelets at that time. The regulation marching shoes, barracks shoes and gymnasium shoes are not present in this line up, so it's anybody's guess as to what the remaining shoes are.

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Erick & Charlie, thanks for adding pic from your collections. It's great to see what kind of "jim-dandy" images others have!

 

Now I'll add a few more of my own, hopefully the new addition will also measure up to the high jim-dandy bar that mike korea set. Thanks for the compliment Mike.

 

I have a number of photos showing troops in the barracks during this time period. This one, of an Indiana National Guard trooper around 1910 is interesting because of the shoe line-up beneath his bunk.

Nice additions Brian! Do you know where the photo of the Indiana National Guardsman was taken? From the shell that he is holding, I assume that he is with the Artillery Regiment.

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" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. "

View my website honoring the men and women of Indiana: http://indianavets.wix.com/indiana-at-war and follow my updates on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/IndianaModernAgeofWar/
Interested in US uniforms? Join the Association of American Military Uniform Collectors! http://aamuc.org/or find us on Facebook! facebook.com/AAMUC.ORG

 

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Erik, it looks as if I was mistaken about that photo being Indiana related - my apologies.

 

When looking at the stencil on the canteen in the photo I thought it was an abbreviation of Indiana. However, when I enlarged it to see what other information the canteen might have, it reads something else, but not Indiana. Unfortunately, I can't figure out what the canteen actually has stenciled on it. Maybe somebody else can?

 

By way of identification, there is nothing written on the back, but there is a "Nichols" watermark in the lower right hand corner. There is also what I think is a Coast Artillery chevron sewn onto the sleeve of the overcoat hung on the wall behind the reclining soldier.

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Here's one that's a little different, I guess he didn't care for the boring issue necktie!

 

 

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" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. "

View my website honoring the men and women of Indiana: http://indianavets.wix.com/indiana-at-war and follow my updates on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/IndianaModernAgeofWar/
Interested in US uniforms? Join the Association of American Military Uniform Collectors! http://aamuc.org/or find us on Facebook! facebook.com/AAMUC.ORG

 

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