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Best way to apply stencils to clothing and equipment


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Not sure if this is the right section to post this in (please move if it is in the wrong place)

 

I have a lot of vintage brass stencil sets that I'd like to play around with using.

I'd like to stencil clothing, canvas bags, etc. And may some equipment like boxes, etc.

 

Does anybody here have any pointers on the best way to go about this? What brush to use, paint, technique etc.

 

Also, is there a way to make stencils look vintage/period?

 

Thanks!

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MastersMate

It has been a thousand years, but if I recall.. We used a brush called a sash tool, rounded shape. Taped the bristles to make a tight compact brush. Used very little paint and dabbed it onto the surface perpendicular to the stencil. Did not want paint to get under the edge of the stencil.. It took quite a bit of practice. There was a professional stencil tool, made by Marks or March or Marsh, that was specifically for stencil work..

 

Before safety stickers were made for ships, it was all done by hand..

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It has been a thousand years, but if I recall.. We used a brush called a sash tool, rounded shape. Taped the bristles to make a tight compact brush. Used very little paint and dabbed it onto the surface perpendicular to the stencil. Did not want paint to get under the edge of the stencil.. It took quite a bit of practice. There was a professional stencil tool, made by Marks or March or Marsh, that was specifically for stencil work..

 

Before safety stickers were made for ships, it was all done by hand..

 

Thanks! That's helpful. I have had trouble with paint getting under the stencils and bleeding

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You can also try a small sponge or one of the mini paint rollers made out of sponge material.Then dab the paint on in small amounts.May have to do this in stages or go back over a few times.The roller with rounded end may work best.Try it on a scrap piece of cloth or wood etc.

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STENCIL PEN!!

 

Done and done..that's how we did it in the Navy.

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STENCIL PEN!!

 

Done and done..that's how we did it in the Navy.

 

What's a stencil pen? Can't seem to find much on them.

Thanks!

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What's a stencil pen? Can't seem to find much on them.

Thanks!

 

CALLING SIGSAYE!! :D He was a Company Commander and had the pleasure of teaching us young squids how to use them!

 

Made by Marktex, it's like a paint pen..with a metal ball point tip..but with stencil ink in it..had a bulb at the end you'd use to pump ink to the tip..we were issued 2 white and black, and were sold in the ship's store too if yours dried up (because you didn't cap it properly) or was lost, stolen, or loaned out and not returned.. You used the black for light colors, (dungaree shirt, whites, skivvies, t-shirts, OD green) and white for dark colors, (blues, dungaree pants, blue utility jacket/foul weather gear..etc..)

1marktex.jpg

(the same version I used early '90's)

 

One thing is certain..you did NOT ever want to use a Sharpie or magic marker! Totally unsat! It would smear, and run.and spread out, looking like a bloated donut...a total hot mess!! You could stencil with spray paint though if stencil was held tight to garment..we did flight deck jerseys like that.

 

Here's the modern version.

dym12760101.jpg

http://www.tooldiscounter.com/ItemDisplay.cfm?lookup=MAR16083

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CALLING SIGSAYE!! :D He was a Company Commander and had the pleasure of teaching us young squids how to use them!

 

Made by Marktex, it's like a paint pen..with a metal ball point tip..but with stencil ink in it..had a bulb at the end you'd use to pump ink to the tip..we were issued 2 white and black, and were sold in the ship's store too if yours dried up (because you didn't cap it properly) or was lost, stolen, or loaned out and not returned.. You used the black for light colors, (dungaree shirt, whites, skivvies, t-shirts, OD green) and white for dark colors, (blues, dungaree pants, blue utility jacket/foul weather gear..etc..)

1marktex.jpg

(the same version I used early '90's)

 

One thing is certain..you did NOT ever want to use a Sharpie or magic marker! Totally unsat! It would smear, and run.and spread out, looking like a bloated donut...a total hot mess!! You could stencil with spray paint though if stencil was held tight to garment..we did flight deck jerseys like that.

 

Here's the modern version.

dym12760101.jpg

http://www.tooldiscounter.com/ItemDisplay.cfm?lookup=MAR16083

 

Great! Thanks so much for all that info. I might get a couple of these and try them out!

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PS. Kris, did you use brass stencils or oil board cutout stencils?

 

BOTH! :D

 

We were issued a stencil card in boot camp, (the Million Dollar Bill!) that had last name then first and middle initials, your initials, company number, and last 4 of SSN, and when that was worn out, if you knew someone, or your shop had the half inch brass set, you'd use those.

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Great! Thanks so much for all that info. I might get a couple of these and try them out!

 

You're welcome! The Navy eventually went to embroidered name tapes, but it was 100% stencils for me when I was in.

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Going way back there! Mastersmate, is that the brush you're referring to?

 

For boxes and crates though, and other equipment, spray paint is very authentic..(POST WW2 era, pre and during, brush it!) even with overspray/drips! :D

 

Time and care was only given (sorta LOL) to clothes.

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MastersMate

The wooden handle was longer and tapered, but the same shape for the bristles.

 

When doing paint jobs, you'd make a list of compartment numbers and fitting classifications. The Bos'n Hole guy would use the cutter machine and pinch out a stencil for everything in your DC area. You got maybe a couple of uses out of the stencil.. They had a brass set in larger sizes you had to sign out and return them all pristine cleaned up. The Seaman running the cage wielded a lot of horsepower when it came to checking out the good gear..

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