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Typical WW2 USAAF pilot's headset


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I double checked and his primary position was as a radio operator, not just a gunner. His last name and the last four of his service number are on his Mae West. The full data stamp is also legible on the Mae West as well.

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I snagged another headset cheap and it came with this cord, which I believe is the one that goes from the HS-33 to the aircraft jack/intercom box? Any help is appreciated!

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looks like the extension cord that would go from headset/helmet to interphone control box... a nice cord to have...and now you will need the push to talk switch....

 

Yes I do!

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  • 1 year later...

I know there was a dicussion on the white foam ear cushion being post war use. I saw this pic and wanted to know what type is this gent on the upper left wearing?

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Semper Fi

Phil

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I snagged another headset cheap and it came with this cord, which I believe is the one that goes from the HS-33 to the aircraft jack/intercom box? Any help is appreciated!

 

hello, just noticed now - this kind of cord extension is strictly USN, not AAF. First letter a bit scratched is "N", N.A.F. for Naval Aircraft Factory.

N.A.F. 215284-2 on this plug, and the radio jack at the other end must necessarily carry "N.A.F. PART N° 1136-1" , being not visible in this photo.

 

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hello, just noticed now - this kind of cord extension is strictly USN, not AAF. First letter a bit scratched is "N", N.A.F. for Naval Aircraft Factory.

N.A.F. 215284-2 on this plug, and the radio jack at the other end must necessarily carry "N.A.F. PART N° 1136-1" , being not visible in this photo.

 

 

Thanks, that makes sense. Guess I need to get a USN headset now!

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I think those are the chamois lined type (post 25 on here) ear cups. They do contrast with the black rubber.

That is what I thought. This is a war time picture. So these were worn during the war. Not post war like many suggest.

Here is the full photo with the story/timeframe behind it.

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Semper Fi

Phil

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It appears these ear pads were used in a modified form (with microphone attached) in the 1950s in SAC bombers according to this scene from "Strategic Air Command" with Jimmy Stewart and Harry Morgan. I don't know the nomenclature for this set-up.

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That is what I thought. This is a war time picture. So these were worn during the war. Not post war like many suggest.

Here is the full photo with the story/timeframe behind it.

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Semper Fi

Phil

Phil,

After a closer look at the photo you posted, I would have to disagree. I believe what you are seeing is an HS-33 headset that is using the cushions from an RAF air crew headset. Rather than "white foam", they are kapok filled, chamois covered "doughnuts" that were the inspiration for what the US used later on both flying helmets (A-11, AN-H-15, etc.) and headset cushions. Below is an enlargement from your photo. Note how far the earphones protrude and how much of the "doughnut" is showing, then compare that to the US version to see the difference. Also shown is the RAF aircrew headset without earphones, then one with RAF earphones and cord (and throat mic).

Regards, Paul

 

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Also...the large rubber cups in the A-11 and the AN-H-15 were sewn into the flight helmets...there are examples of the HS headsets with earcups designed for the flight helmets, with the raw unsewn material still attached, being used as HS earcups ..that is earcups never having been sewn on to a flight helmet, redirected as headset earcups..

I am not sure if these flight helmet cups were wartime used or postwar use...but seems feasible they were used during wartime

 

pic is from worthpoint

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Yes Paul it does look like a RAF headset when you zoom in . It has the same bumps on the side.

Well I thought I was on to something.

Thank you for the clarification and the excellent example of the RAF to compare.

Spot on!

Phantom that is another interesting example of American ingenuity.

Thanks for that pic.

Semper Fi

Phil

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