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A B-29 Crash Site in the U.S.


bigschuss

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Charlie Flick

A most interesting story. I am glad to hear that the site was found and the family was able to make that connection.

 

My father was a multi-engine USAAF pilot in WW2. I remember him lamenting many times in my youth about the high numbers of young men killed in training accidents during the war. We tend to focus on those lost in battle, but those killed while preparing for battle, such as this young bombardier, also deserve to be remembered for their service and sacrifice.

 

Thanks for the post.

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

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brandon_rss18

Absolutely amazing! My Great Cousin, Louis E. Machala, was a B-17 pilot and was killed on a rutine training flight in 46 I believe, I will have to look it up. My grandmother to this day still believes the plane was sabotaged, but I just wonder how many people who lost loved ones here in the states thought that as well. How close was the actual sight compared to the one yall had visited the day before? Thanks so much for sharing!

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I must admit I've been wanting to do something like this someday to find my own Uncle's crash site. He crashed in a civilian corporate aircraft somewhere outside of the Atlanta area. I'm sure finding the site shouldn't be too tough as the FAA kept good records. Considering how the area has expanded since the 50s, it could be in someone's back yard today. He was a CBI transport pilot during the war and got the DFC for flying over the "Hump."

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Absolutely amazing! My Great Cousin, Louis E. Machala, was a B-17 pilot and was killed on a rutine training flight in 46 I believe, I will have to look it up. My grandmother to this day still believes the plane was sabotaged, but I just wonder how many people who lost loved ones here in the states thought that as well. How close was the actual sight compared to the one yall had visited the day before? Thanks so much for sharing!

 

 

Thanks for all of the coments guys. I thought people might appreciate this story. I think the world of my brother for making the efforts to help my Gram out. What a journey!

 

Brandon, my Gram and brother weren't off by much. Their first visit to the crash site got them to the farm. But my brother's GPS just couldn't find the exact spot. On the second visit with the gentleman from the restaurant, he got them to the exact spot, which was just off by a few hundred yards or so.

 

Jordan77, I agree that divine intervention played a role. My Gram is an old school, devoted Catholic. I think she had some help that day.

 

Thanks for letting me share,

Blair

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Great topic and thread all around - thanks for posting your family's story!

 

I have a question for you... your uncle survived his WW2 service. Was he Air Corps then, a combat guy, ??? Just curious I guess. It's terribly, sadly, ironic that a man survives the war to die during the peace.

 

I have a small grouping to a man killed in a training accident during WW2. By my research for that group I found out how shockingly common training accidents and deaths were during WW2, and I know that as the Cold War heated up, they continued on.

 

I was just looking at an aviation archeology website the other day and it mentioned how grossly inaccurate "officially recorded" locations for crash sites can be and usually are. With that said, I will agree that it was a little divine help that helped your brother and Grandma get in touch with the man who knew the exact location!

 

MW

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  • 3 months later...

A very special story indeed! What a stroke of luck for your family that the guy was able to find you. Thanks for sharing!

 

-Ski

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Thank you for shareing. If you ever decide to reprint the book, let me know. I would love a copy.

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  • 3 months later...
fortworthgal

Wow, what an interesting story! That is really neat (and I agree, provenance!) that the guy who knew the exact crash site showed up. That is so neat that your grandmother was able to visit the site. Thanks for posting this story.

 

A friend of ours researched a similar crash in Weatherford, Texas: http://www.texasescapes.com/WorldWarII/Tra...erfordTexas.htm

 

Thanks to his research and publicity, they recently dedicated an historical marker regarding the crash at the Public Library.

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  • 10 months later...
Wow, what an interesting story! That is really neat (and I agree, provenance!) that the guy who knew the exact crash site showed up. That is so neat that your grandmother was able to visit the site. Thanks for posting this story.

 

A friend of ours researched a similar crash in Weatherford, Texas: http://www.texasescapes.com/WorldWarII/Tra...erfordTexas.htm

 

Thanks to his research and publicity, they recently dedicated an historical marker regarding the crash at the Public Library.

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In the fall of 1949 I was a seven year old boy living in Talihina. I have always remembered early one evening when my dad gathered up my mom, my baby brother, and me and we headed out into the country to see an airplane crash. There were many other townspeople milling around at the site. I still remember that there were lots of trees and brush burning lighting up the area. The smell of the fuel still lingers. I remember my dad telling me it was a B-29. I have remembered that event for over 60 years and, with a free moment, I googled in B-29 crashes oklahoma. You can imagine my surprise when your entry popped up and when I opened it, there was the story and the name of my town. I don't know why those images stuck with me all these years, but I'm glad they did. It was good to find out about one of the aviators. It helped to personalize my memory. Thank you for doing that.

 

scribth

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everforward

A great read. Thanks for bringing this thread back out again.

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