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WW2 M1 Helmet with name stamped on front


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I got this off of ebay the other day and the seller listed it as a navy helmet.(came from estate sale).Were these name stamps specific to one branch, or were they generic marking kits used across all branches. I've seen ww2 usmc field gear marked similarly. This is the only decent picture the seller provided. I plan on trying to research the name, but I am not sure where to look or start. I can barely make out a seam on the front. Any info related to the name stamping on helmets is greatly appreciated.

What branch would this helmet most likely be from? Thanks

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From my experience I'd say this is most likely Navy

GEN. David R. Atchinson- MO State Guard              ACW

PVT. John H. Drury- Co. A, 27th Ky IR                      ACW               Died of Typhoid

PVT. Henry E. Thomas- Co. I, 17th Ky IR                  ACW

PVT. Joseph E. Drury- Co. E, 356th IR, 89th ID       WWI                WIA

SGT. Edward P. Drury- 51st QM Training Co.           WWII

PFC. Delmer C. Koonter- Co. I, 142nd IR, 36th ID    WWII              WIA

SC3c Michael C. Drury- LCS (L) (3) 70                     WWII

SGT. Steven D. Koonter- 5th Cav, 1st Cav Div         Vietnam

SGT. John M. Drury- 227th AVN Bn. 1st Cav Div     Vietnam

 

Contact me with items from the 36th Infantry Division or any IDd uniforms of European Theater Infantry Divisions

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Thank you for all the replies. I searched USMC muster rolls and found no matches, but found one E E Whetstone in the ww2 navy ancestry records. Now to decide if I want to sign up and view the record. I don't buy too many named items, but is ancestry worth it? After all there may be nothing in the record.

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Thank you for all the replies. I searched USMC muster rolls and found no matches, but found one E E Whetstone in the ww2 navy ancestry records. Now to decide if I want to sign up and view the record. I don't buy too many named items, but is ancestry worth it? After all there may be nothing in the record.

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I switched to fold3.com from ancestry. I find that fold3, which is almost exclusively military records related, is far more extensive and for only $8.00 a month for a premium membership, it's WELL worth it!

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Found him: According to fold3.com, he's listed as a SM 2c (RM) and served aboard the USS Charlottesville (PF25) from 16 Dec 1944 to 17 Jan 1945. His US Navy ID number is 205-51-59. "Departing New York City on 18 August 1944, Charlottesville arrived at Finschhafen, New Guinea, on 29 September 1944 by way of Bora Bora in the Society Islands. She operated on convoy escort and anti-submarine patrol duty between New Guinea and the Philippine Islands until 6 March 1945, when she departed Leyte in the Philippines for Seattle, Washington." After that, she was transferred to the Russian Navy where she was in service from 1945-1949, and later saw use in the Japanese maritime fleet defense fleet from 1953-1972. The Japanese decommissioned her in 1969 and in 1972 she was returned to the US. What became of her after that is unknown.

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Found him: According to fold3.com, he's listed as a SM 2c (RM) and served aboard the USS Charlottesville (PF25) from 16 Dec 1944 to 17 Jan 1945. His US Navy ID number is 205-51-59. "Departing New York City on 18 August 1944, Charlottesville arrived at Finschhafen, New Guinea, on 29 September 1944 by way of Bora Bora in the Society Islands. She operated on convoy escort and anti-submarine patrol duty between New Guinea and the Philippine Islands until 6 March 1945, when she departed Leyte in the Philippines for Seattle, Washington." After that, she was transferred to the Russian Navy where she was in service from 1945-1949, and later saw use in the Japanese maritime fleet defense fleet from 1953-1972. The Japanese decommissioned her in 1969 and in 1972 she was returned to the US. What became of her after that is unknown.

Holy cow! Thank you so much. Is it very likely that this was his helmet? I think front seam, swivel bail is appropriate for the time frame.The helmet came from Rhode Island. Did the records happen to say where he was born? Unfortunately I don't think there is any ID number in the shell. I'll have to wait until it arrives. Helmet has no liner either. Again I can't thank you enough.

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Holy cow! Thank you so much. Is it very likely that this was his helmet? I think front seam, swivel bail is appropriate for the time frame.The helmet came from Rhode Island. Did the records happen to say where he was born? Unfortunately I don't think there is any ID number in the shell. I'll have to wait until it arrives. Helmet has no liner either. Again I can't thank you enough.

It'spossible, but without further information, it's impossible to say with any degree of certainty. I was also able to locate an Elizabeth E Whetstone who enlisted in the Womens Army Corps (WAC) in Reno County, Kansas in 1943. She was born in 1894 making her 49 years old when she enlisted! It's not out of the realm of possibilities that this could be hers as well. But again, I could probably locate a hundred Whetstones that served in that time period.

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I did some research on it when I saw it on eBay and I think his name is Elmer E Whetstone. He was from same area as seller. He went to the Philippine Islands in 1945 after serving on the Charlottesville and was a SM2/c(RM). I believe he was part of the ACORN seabee units that would setup and maintain island airfields in the Philippine Sea Frontier. Dont quote me on this but im pretty sure.

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I did some research on it when I saw it on eBay and I think his name is Elmer E Whetstone. He was from same area as seller. He went to the Philippine Islands in 1945 after serving on the Charlottesville and was a SM2/c(RM). I believe he was part of the ACORN seabee units that would setup and maintain island airfields in the Philippine Sea Frontier. Dont quote me on this but im pretty sure.

There's two votes for USN service!

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There's two votes for USN service!

 

 

Plus, the man identified to the Navy was from the same place as the seller...Rhode Island. Im pretty sure thats your guy!

Thank you guys for the replies and information. This was my first named helmet and I can't believe that there is a large possibility(I know it's not 100% certain) it was really used overseas and didn't stay stateside the whole war.

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Thank you guys for the replies and information. This was my first named helmet and I can't believe that there is a large possibility(I know it's not 100% certain) it was really used overseas and didn't stay stateside the whole war.

 

Congrats. Its a nice helmet. You dont need a fixed loop helmet to have a good story behind it. The SeaBees often marked their helmets with their name just like your example.

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