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N.C. Meyers USMC NCO sword how old?

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I have this Meyers sword for the Marine NCO, it has a "proved" button and is 30" long. When I was a Marine NCO, we learned sword manual with the NCO sword but I never paid close attention to the swords as we quickly turned them back into the Corporal's or Sergeants school that checked them out to us. Additionally, sword manual and drill was a graded event so I had a little disdain for it. This one is better quality and older than the ones we used. When I became an officer we were mandated (by MCO) to purchase an approved officer's sword (Mameluke) so the sword manual came in handy. Our swords were measured by inseam and they were to fall midway between the top and bottom of ear if I remember correctly. This one works well for me though my officer sword has a 34" blade. Anyways, please nerd out and tell me how old this bugger is. Thanks.

Paul

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Hopefully someone more knowledgable of the dating of the numerous variations in N. S. Meyer's logo will be able to better tell you when this particular logo was used. Until then, however, I would say your sword looks to be from the mid-30s to Mid-40s. Swords from at least the early '60s are stamped or etched with a USMC ordnance serial number and are usually stamped "stainless". It does not appear as though your sword is marked with a country of origin, which would indicate it was made in the U.S.. I do not believe swords were made domestically since the mid-1940s. If made domestically, it was probably produced by the :M. C. Lilley Co. or its successor, the Lilley-Ames Co. The stylized lilley on and around the proof slug may support this attribution, but I wouldn't put too much faith in it since slugs marked "PROVED" over a fluer de lys were used for a long time by a lot of companies. I have an Ames-made M1852 Navy sword c.1910 with such a slug as well as an Eichkorn-made Meyers USMC NCO sword c.1968. The earliest your sword could be is c.1920 when the Marines adopted the modern narrow-bladed sword with the current etching design. One thing I like about your sword is the rack number stamped on the guard, which would indicate this sword was purchased and used by the Corps as opposed to being a private purchase item.

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Thanks friend for your response. This one is marked "Germany" at the hilt. I apologize for not noting earlier. Is "30" the blade length or a rack number?

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This sword was made in Germany by Carl Eickhorn, Solingen Germany for the importer/distributor N.S. Meyer, New York. Based on the Trademarks it dates to the 1950's. Before WWII Ames, M.C. Lilley and later Lilley-Ames made NCOs for only Horstmann, the USMC supplier.

Most collectors do not know that before WWII there were two levels of NCO sword, one for sergeants and the other for staff sergeants and above.

Wouldn't that make an interesting thread.

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Tim, have you ever seen the the Staff NCO version of the post-WWI NCO sword with the thin blade and a scabbard with two carrying rings? I have only seen one example, and it was in miserable condition. I have been looking for another example to use as an illustration in a pending article in Man at Arms. Here is what I currently have:

 

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I knew a dirth of knowledge would arrive. Yes a good topic for a thread on those earlier swords . I now understand this one is from the 1950s.. Korea war era . Thanks.for so much knowledge.

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I see a Mogen David etched on this sword.

Is that unusual?

Does it say anything about the owner of the sword or the unit he was in?

 

blade

 


HONORING FAMILY LtCol Wm Russell (1679-1757) VA Mil; Pvt Zachariah McKay (1714-97) Frederick VA Mil; BrigGen Evan Shelby, Jr (1719-94) VA Mil; Pvt Vincent Hobbs (1722-1808) Wythe VA Mil; Pvt Hugh Alexander (1724-77); Lt John R. Litton (1726-1804); Bvt BrigGen/Col Wm W. Russell (1735-93) 5th VA Rgmt; Lt James Scott (1736-1817); Capt John Murray, Sr (1747-1833); Capt John Sehorn, Sr (1748-1831) VA Mil; Pvt Corbin Lane (1750-1816) Franklin/TN Mil; Cpl Jesse D. Reynolds (1750-1836) 5th VA Rgmt; Capt. Solomon C. Litton (1751-1844); 1Lt Christopher Casey (1754-1840) SC Mil; Pvt Mark Adams (1755-1828); Pvt Randolph White (1755-1831) Bailey's Co. VA Rgmt; Capt. John R. Russell (1758-1838); Pvt Joseph T. Cooley (1767-1826) Fort Hempstead Mil; Pvt Thomas Barron (1776-1863) 1812; Capt. John Baumgardner (1787-1853) VA Mil; Pvt Joel Estep (1828-1864) Co B 5th KY Inf CSA & US; Pvt George B. Bell (1833-1910) Co C 47th IL Inf US; Cpl Daniel H. Barron (1838-1910) Co B 19th TN Rgmt Inf CSA; Capt Richard K. Kaufman (1908-1946) 7th PRG/3rd AF CCU; T-5 Vernon L. Bell (1926-95) 1802nd Spec Rgmt; PO2 Murray J. Heichman (1932-2019) HQSB/MCRD; PFC Jess Long (1934-2017) US Army; PFC Donald W. Johnson (1931-) 43rd ID HQ; A1C Keith W. Bell (1931-2011) 314th TCW; A3C Michael S. Bell (1946-) 3346th CMS; A1C Sam W. Lee (1954-2017) 2d BW; AW3 Keith J. Price (1975-) VP-10; 1Lt Matthew Wm Bell (1985-) 82nd Abn/SOC








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I have two of them. The other needs to be properly photographed.

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No. The Star of David is part of the design. There may be symbolism...i have to check my mameluke to see if it is on that,as well. I think so.

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No. The Star of David is part of the design. There may be symbolism...i have to check my mameluke to see if it is on that,as well. I think so.

 

It is not really a Star of David, but a symbol of quality which some say goes back to the sword makers of Damascus. It is used extensively, especially on UK and German-made swords, usually surrounding the proof slug.

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