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Strange US M1 Liner


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Hi guys,

 

I recently found this liner at an estate sale and have a few questions. Whats the best way to date these? Also, ive seen these fire helmet repaints on Post German WWII helmets, but is this common to find in the USA?

 

Thanks for the help!

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That is one weird duck in my opinion. WW2 hardware and webbing with post war neck strap webbing, appears not to have a grommet hole front center. You may need to pull the foam back a bit on interior to see maker's mark. Positive someone here has better insight into this particular liner…. thanks for posting!

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That is one weird duck in my opinion. WW2 hardware and webbing with post war neck strap webbing, appears not to have a grommet hole front center. You may need to pull the foam back a bit on interior to see maker's mark. Positive someone here has better insight into this particular liner…. thanks for posting!

I appreciate the response! When I am back home I will let everyone know the maker mark.

 

Thanks for all the help!!

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The 'W' is the maker Westinghouse and the '5' is the mold number that the fibreglass liner was formed in.

 

The webbing is WWII and not post-war; I owned liners that had a slight OD shade webbing. This liner is a typical late war issue (1944-1945) with triple weave webbing on the suspension and double weave on the nape area; the factory was using up all the webbing stocks to web the liner, very common to see this on mid/late WWII Liners. Sweatband and leather liner chinstrap are also WWII issue.

 

Also very common to see WWII helmets and liners re-used post-war for fire fighters, police, miners, VFW etc. like this liner was.

 

Pat

donation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

 

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The 'W' is the maker Westinghouse and the '5' is the mold number that the fibreglass liner was formed in.

 

The webbing is WWII and not post-war; I owned liners that had a slight OD shade webbing. This liner is a typical late war issue (1944-1945) with triple weave webbing on the suspension and double weave on the nape area; the factory was using up all the webbing stocks to web the liner, very common to see this on mid/late WWII Liners. Sweatband and leather liner chinstrap are also WWII issue.

 

Also very common to see WWII helmets and liners re-used post-war for fire fighters, police, miners, VFW etc. like this liner was.

 

Pat

Thanks Pat for the help! This is very useful!

 

William

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I think I might see the grommet hole under the decal, just under the tip of the inner black triangle and above the top of the yellow symbol?

Money can't buy happiness -- but somehow it's more comfortable to cry in a Corvette than in a Yugo.

 

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Forgive me for asking, but what is a grommet hole?

 

Sorry about that! Im still trying to learn the terminology.

 

Thank you for the help.

 

William

No need to apologise!

 

The WWII low pressure and higher pressure liners had a small hole in the front used to attach rank or branch insignia, this feature was eliminated after WWII.

 

Also called eyelets.

A picture is worth a thousand words, so here's a thousand pictures!

"I read that in war bad things happen, Ain't that the ************* truth" -1st Lt Mike Scotti

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I keep wondering about the exact color of the webbing. It looks to my eye like it could be the in-between OG#3 and OG#7 color seen on some post war euro liners?

 

Here is my early WWII St Clair liner, note the webbing is same triple weave and a bit darker shade of OD.

 

Pat

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donation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

 

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Material comparison of WWII and Korean War nape straps.

 

There were many shades of material in WWII but Korean War was a distinct dark OD.

 

I was talking about the in-between color that is somewhere, well, in-between the WW2 vs Post war samples in the picture. I think it's post war Belgian webbing that I'm referring to. I may just be seeing it wrong, but that's what I thought I was seeing??

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The 'W' is the maker Westinghouse and the '5' is the mold number that the fibreglass liner was formed in.

 

The webbing is WWII and not post-war; I owned liners that had a slight OD shade webbing. This liner is a typical late war issue (1944-1945) with triple weave webbing on the suspension and double weave on the nape area; the factory was using up all the webbing stocks to web the liner, very common to see this on mid/late WWII Liners. Sweatband and leather liner chinstrap are also WWII issue.

 

Also very common to see WWII helmets and liners re-used post-war for fire fighters, police, miners, VFW etc. like this liner was.

 

Pat

Resin permeated 8oz cotton canvas duct. Not fiberglass.

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No need to apologise!

 

The WWII low pressure and higher pressure liners had a small hole in the front used to attach rank or branch insignia, this feature was eliminated after WWII.

 

Also called eyelets.

The grommet hole was actually deleted from the production process in 1955. So Korean war liners with #7 OD HBT also sport them.

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