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Spectacular Bullion Navy Rates


dpcsdan
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Here are a couple tough rates to find. I think the official designation of this is "aircrew survival equipmentman", the first on blue:

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Aviation Electronics Technician CPO marked GEMSCO manufacturer. This bullion still displays a high shine with no tarnishing, yet.

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Although this is not a rating badge, it is an early distinguishing mark, but it is very rare and is done in thin wire bullion. It's an engineering striker mark, I believe pre-WWI, although it is a named blouse/jumper, this DM is not listed in Navy Uniform regulations. I've seen three good examples of this DM.

-dan

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Here is a bullion Petty Officer 1st Class Sailmaker's Mate rate with good conduct gold chevrons. As previously mentioned, this rate only went to 1st Class. There were no CPO Sailmaker's Mates.

-fritz

 

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+ 1 ... PO1 with the six gold hashmarks. Typical for a boatswains mate called "an old salt". Twenty four years service with good conduct but only a PO1 (can't make out the speciality mark on the rating badge).

EDIT: Pictures are lost

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+ 1 ... PO1 with the six gold hashmarks. Typical for a boatswains mate called "an old salt". Twenty four years service with good conduct but only a PO1 (can't make out the speciality mark on the rating badge).

 

usn123dzw2.jpg

 

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If you notice, he only has 16 years worth of Good Conduct ribbons/stars. The Navy has changed the rules for wearing Gold several times. At one time, it was cumulitive, meaning is you could muster up 12 years of good conduct throughout a career, you got gold. Then there was a time that if you got gold, you kept it even if you did not continue with good conduct. And then there were some guys that simply chose not to go up for Chief. I knew guys like that who were happy being a First Class and had no desire to be Chiefs. Before the Navy went into the "Up or Out" mode, I knew a Sailor who had 12 years of good conduct and was still a Seaman (BMSN, E-3 Boatswains Mate). He just liked being a leading Seaman (he did not wear gold hashmarks as there are no gold E-3 stripes). I also saw a Third Class Torpedoman (Submarines) with 4 gold hashmarks. He liked where he was and what he did.

 

Great uniforms though, love seeing all the hashmarks.

 

Steve Hesson

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If you notice, he only has 16 years worth of Good Conduct ribbons/stars. The Navy has changed the rules for wearing Gold several times. At one time, it was cumulitive, meaning is you could muster up 12 years of good conduct throughout a career, you got gold. Then there was a time that if you got gold, you kept it even if you did not continue with good conduct. And then there were some guys that simply chose not to go up for Chief. I knew guys like that who were happy being a First Class and had no desire to be Chiefs. Before the Navy went into the "Up or Out" mode, I knew a Sailor who had 12 years of good conduct and was still a Seaman (BMSN, E-3 Boatswains Mate). He just liked being a leading Seaman (he did not wear gold hashmarks as there are no gold E-3 stripes). I also saw a Third Class Torpedoman (Submarines) with 4 gold hashmarks. He liked where he was and what he did.

 

Great uniforms though, love seeing all the hashmarks.

 

Steve Hesson

Nice PO1 uniform.

I never ran across a seaman with three hashmarks, saw a number of seaman and fireman with two hashmarks.

-dan

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Nice PO1 uniform.

I never ran across a seaman with three hashmarks, saw a number of seaman and fireman with two hashmarks.

-dan

His name was BMSN "Head Dog" Passaow. I was an SM3 with a measly 2 and a half years in and he scared the Hell out of me. I thought he was just another slug who couldn't hold onto a rate until I saw him dressed out in dress blues with BMSN stripes, three hashmarks and three Good Conduct medals (along with the other stuff that went with service through the '60s, early '70s.

 

Steve Hesson

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Salvage Sailor

I've actually seen a gold three hashmark Seaman. He was at Great Lakes going to an A School in early 1977. At first I though he was a busted PO, but now I think he was an OSVET (Other services veteran) who transferred to the USN which was quite common in the post Vietnam navy. I've told the story before of the ex-USAF OSVET in my A School class. When the LT was inspecting us at graduation, he stopped in front of this Seaman......

 

Aircrew wings, Air medals, bronze star, good conduct, Vietnam ribbons, ......The LT asks "are those really yours?"

 

"Yes Sir!" says the newly minted OSSN......next day, instant OS2 (E-5)

 

That may have happened to the 'Gold' Seaman I saw too, never did find out what his story was.

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Stinger Gunner USMC
+ 1 ... PO1 with the six gold hashmarks. Typical for a boatswains mate called "an old salt". Twenty four years service with good conduct but only a PO1 (can't make out the speciality mark on the rating badge).

 

usn123dzw2.jpg

 

usn4jc7.jpg

He is a Boatswain's mate 1/c. I like that one!

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