Jump to content

Thank you for your service...


Recommended Posts

I recently had the opportunity to do a private tour of Wendover AFB in their WW2 Ford Jeep. Mindful of some great photo ops, I wore in my WW2 Major's OD dress uniform. While I was standing waiting to catch a shuttle from the Casino/Hotel to the base, an older passenger from an unloading shuttle thanked me for my service. I quickly explained I was just wearing a WW2 uniform due to an event at the Airfield, and I had not served in the US military nor WW2. I was curious if this has happened to others on here and how you would deal with this?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Garandomatic

All the time when I march some of my high school students (usually freshmen and sophomores) in the Veterans' Parade in uniforms from WWI-Nam or so. I just explain, every time. They mean pretty well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes as a re enactor (retired) and living historian for many many years. It happened alot. I still get it when in a conversation or I have antique dealers ask me to I.D things. I get it from other Veterans, all my neighbor's who know me still think I'm ex army. Its kind of funny. I tell them I'm just a military historian. Oh yeah. I could not pass a physical being deaf in one ear and other issues. I would have went in if I could have. I guess the Lord had other plans for me. But I still get it all the time....Like above they mean well. I still smile. When you drive a WW2 jeep around the neighborhood. Well..........LOL

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that you mention this I realized something kind of odd. I know quite a few people that do reenacting/living history and none of them were in the military. I know even more military/veterans and none of them do reenacting (that I know of).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suspect the same of most militaria collectors. I know very few WW2/Korea veterans ever wanted much to do with anything WW2/Korean after their service. I guess the reminders would be too vivid in a pre PTSD era.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's unfortunately a cultural lack of education and comprehension of when and where historic events took place and not restricted to reenactors. I served on active duty 1982-2002. When I've told both old and young people that I served in Korea, they react with questions clearly thinking I served in the Korean War (1950-1953) which of course took place long before I was even born. I've also been asked if I served in Vietnam, which ended well before I began my service - it ended when I was a young teenager. (In fact, when I was serving in Korea my dad apparently kept telling people that I was "over in Vietnam" - this was 1983! Unlike us, many people just have no idea when these events took place and can't seem to place them in context.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the three different WWII units I reenact with, we have (had) a lot of veterans through our ranks. We tell our members that are not vets, that if we're out in uniform and someone thanks you for your service, just tell them "thank you". We say they are thanking them for those that can not say thank you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

29navy, Good practice and respectful... I had that thought as well, rather than explain the error and cause the speaker embarrassment, simply stating "thank you" on behalf of those who passed and wore the uniform might be the correct response. If the speaker asked specifics about serving, I feel it would be proper to discreetly correct them by explaining the reason for wearing the uniform and the thank you. Portraying WW2 and earlier, I was under the impression I'm unlikely to be mistaken for a 90+ WW2 veteran.

 

I must add, I strongly feel misleading someone and or accepting anything but a thank you is completely wrong and is perhaps treading close to 'stolen valor' When dressed I always respect both the uniform and those who gave their service to your country.

 

I wouldn't have thought anyone would confuse my WW2 era 'pinks and greens' for current issue, so never considered how to respond.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.