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Garand bayonet question


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Forum members, I have a question concerning M1 garand bayonets.....I have a cut down I picked up at a local antique store....It was cut down to the configuration of an m4 bayonet blade.....Just trying to figure out whether the Koreans did this or an American GI (for a fighting knife?)....My question concerns the pinging done along the cross guard...I've enclosed a photo I found on line of a Korean reworked bayonet....Was similar pinging ever done on WW2 era US made and issued bayonets?....Mine has some similar pinging but not quite as pronounced....Bodes

 

SKor-3.JPG

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First of all, it is agreed that South Korea cut down these bayonets for their Army. This cut down procedure was not done by the US. On my example, the reason for the "pings" are evident. They are used as a method for securing the cross guard. Your picture may show a few practice tries before they were successful.

Marv

post-26996-0-17675600-1503107016.jpg

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First of all, it is agreed that South Korea cut down these bayonets for their Army. This cut down procedure was not done by the US. On my example, the reason for the "pings" are evident. They are used as a method for securing the cross guard. Your picture may show a few practice tries before they were successful.

Marv

 

Thanks for the reply Marv, but isn't that the purpose of the pins?....As far as I know, these were never disassembled by the Koreans..Also on my example the machining is rather crude, whereas Korean reworks are pretty well done.....Mine also has US lightly stamped on one side of the blade and MC (marine corps?) on the other......Bodes

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I'll take credit for the photo; it's from the usmilitaryknives,com site. I believe the guards became loose during the blade grinding and they tightened them with a punch.

 

Some pictures of the bayonet you're asking about would be helpful.

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I suspect that the bayonets that were modified, were well used to begin with and some may have had loose cross guards. The routine then was to stabilize all of the cross guards by using these punch marks. It has been my experience that most of these Korean cut downs were quite crude when compared to any other countries' M1 mods. However, I am very interested in the US and MC markings you mention. I take it you are unable to post pictures?

Marv

I guess Bill Porter beat me to the punch (no pun intended)

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I have a handful I bought, new in the wrapper, in the 90s at 2 for $15. I have one that was done very well, but the others are about as dangerous and useful as a butter knife. Good for parts! SKIP

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Thanks for the replies guys.....Unfortunately I'm currently busy with an estate sale and just brought my 3" brass shell casing in from the post office....Looking it over a bit..

 

Misfit, the knife was marked US Marine corps on the tag when I paid $10 for it....It appears well used and not one just put away....I'm thinking possibly picked up in Korea and marked there or after it was brought home...Stamping appears old from what I can tell....Was lacking grips, but just got a set....Unfortunately, I'm not a picture taker...Bodes

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I'll take credit for the photo; it's from the usmilitaryknives,com site. I believe the guards became loose during the blade grinding and they tightened them with a punch.

 

Some pictures of the bayonet you're asking about would be helpful.

My apologies for hijacking your photo...Was the only one I could find that showed such pinging...Your site is very informative by the way.....Bodes

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The one I had was super cheap and super crude, but it DID come with a decent M8A1 scabbard!

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This is where Gary (Bayonetman) would chime in with some fun facts and insight, he's missed.

As a side note, Gary diligently put his knowledge on paper but no matter how hard you try there are some things that won't get passed on, that being his experience.

So now the question is,......Who here has the passion for bayonets like he and will pick up the torch?

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In my research, I believe the Koreans cut the bayonet blades down to the length of 6-1/2 to 6-9/16"....And when the bayonets were converted to fighting knives, they were reduced to 6" blade length...Am I correct?...Mine has a 6-3/16" long blade....Not sure that means a whole lot...Bodes

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