Jump to content
italian front

WW1 us army jacket? Need opinions please...

Recommended Posts

Hi,

this jacket is fpr sale at interesting price. In your opinion is this an original ww1 jacket?

Thank you in advanced

20258281_1564557336898083_66659473840017

 

20245381_1564557383564745_67054461764237

 

20294549_1564557413564742_80635400004536

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks OK to me. If you look underneath the liner on the hem there should be a makers tag.


donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good to me summer weight. MG unit too!.


Mr.JERRY
Collector of WWI & WWII Home Front Flags, Unit Flags & Guidons,US & German helmets, insignia, uniforms, medals,

Women's Military Uniforms,Wisconsin Vocational School made Fighting Knives.

Military Shop Owner & Dealer in everything else~!


donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

Check out our Facebook page for updates and the latest Shop news!:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Military-Collectibles-Shop/171226792906875
Visit our website (and visit our shop if you are ever near Milwaukee, WI USA)
http://www.militarycollectorsHQ.com

See what Mr.Jerry has on eBay this week:

https://www.ebay.com/sch/mr.jerry/m.html?_ipg=200&_sop=1&_rdc=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks just fine to me. The 25th Infantry was a "colored" infantry unit that was garrisoned in Hawaii for the duration of WWI. The summer weight coat would be proper for that assignment. It dates from after May 1918 which is when the Army dropped the rank insignia for both sleeves, going with just one on the right arm in order to save wool. Love the collar disc. First time I have seen one for the machine gun company of the regiment. Real nice! FYI - both of the colored regular regiments (24th and 25th) were not sent to France as "punishment" for the racial problems the 24th was involved in in Texas. I do not remember for sure but I think 11 men of the 24th were executed after a court martial. MHJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes - WW1 is a favorite of mine. Fortunate to be able to find these items. They were worn regularly after arriving back home. Sometimes that was their only clothing to wear.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice uniform and original as stated.The jacket isnt rare on its own and the value lies in the collar disc in my opinion.If it were named but with out the collar disc for the 25th its a common uniform.

 

I tried to sell a nice patched engineers summer uniform here on the forum and no takers.


In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I googled them and the 25th MG was assigned to the 9th division. I could not cut and paste so I just retyped the entry. Organized 18 August, 1918 at Camp Sheridan AL, as component of 9th Division. Demobilized Feb. 1919 at Camp Sheridan.

 

 

I am not saying that your guy was with this unit and not the colored unit mentioned above just another avenue for you to explore.

 

Bob


donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Bob's point, the machine gun battalions had the MG on the top of the disc with the company letter in the lower panel. This disc IS the machine gun company of the 25th Infantry Regiment. MHJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool I didn't know that, thanks for the clarification.

 

Bob


donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LittleWilly

 

Would it be safe to say the superior unit was on the top of the disc, while the subordinate unit was below the branch. Such as Co D of the 120th Inf would have the 120 on top and D below.

 

Bob


donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that would be the standard way of showing unit identification. An exception with the numbers is the Coast Artillery Corps. Coast artillery companies not organized into regiments were given numbers instead of letters. The collar disc would have crossed cannon barrels placed high on the disc with the appropriate company number below the cannon barrels. A later style had the crossed cannon barrels with an upright artillery shell in the center. I have seen a few of that style with company letters below the cannons as well, but they do not seem to be commonly done that way. The regimental number would be on the US disc below the letters. The only Coast Artillery uniform in my collection has just the common Field Artillery crossed cannons mid field on the disc. The man was a replacement taken from the Joint Artillery Replacement Depot in France, who had been through some artillery training in the US before being shipped to France. He had just enough training to be considered fit for assignment to a Coast Artillery unit, where his training was completed. He kept his Field Artillery collar insignia either by his choice or perhaps no CAC discs were available to him. A good general book on the subject would be Albert Scipio's The Collar Disc Story 1907 1999. It is long out of print, but you might try Hayes Otoupalik's website. He had a copy awhile back. It is worth looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that would be the standard way of showing unit identification. An exception with the numbers is the Coast Artillery Corps. Coast artillery companies not organized into regiments were given numbers instead of letters. The collar disc would have crossed cannon barrels placed high on the disc with the appropriate company number below the cannon barrels. A later style had the crossed cannon barrels with an upright artillery shell in the center. I have seen a few of that style with company letters below the cannons as well, but they do not seem to be commonly done that way. The regimental number would be on the US disc below the letters. The only Coast Artillery uniform in my collection has just the common Field Artillery crossed cannons mid field on the disc. The man was a replacement taken from the Joint Artillery Replacement Depot in France, who had been through some artillery training in the US before being shipped to France. He had just enough training to be considered fit for assignment to a Coast Artillery unit, where his training was completed. He kept his Field Artillery collar insignia either by his choice or perhaps no CAC discs were available to him. A good general book on the subject would be Albert Scipio's The Collar Disc Story 1907 1999. It is long out of print, but you might try Hayes Otoupalik's website. He had a copy awhile back. It is worth looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.