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Chaplin, Major's class "A" double patched 6th/2nd Armored Division WW2


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I just picked this up last week. A google search led me to the Super 6th web site. Lt. Dale was a part of that first group of Officers that formed what would become the 2nd Armored Division. The uniform came with his NOK dog tags. The shoulder lanyard is a Belgium award. The medal below the ribbon bar is the Grand Dutches Charollette 1944 liberation of Luxembourg medal. The DUI's are 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division, 3rd Army. Major Kent Morehouse Dale's ribbon bar denotes a Bronze Star, Purple Heart and 5 stars on his ETO ribbon, the limited emergency ribbon denotes service prior to the outbreak of W.W.2. Major Dale had prior service in the Army as an enlisted man and after seminary school received a commission as a 2nd Lt. The Reverend Dale was born in Ill. 03NOV08 and after the war had a congregation in Santa Ana Ca. He passed away 29JUL71 and was buried in Ill.

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Really nice coat!

 

-Ski

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

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post-169522-0-66430400-1499914553_thumb.jpgclose up of Luxembourg medal. If anyone can provide details on it that would be great! I posted on W-A and haven't heard anything.

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Backs of pins. I am have no idea who made the DUI. I also have no idea why I can't delete the extra photo.

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post-169522-0-08350400-1499915274_thumb.jpg

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Here's more on the medal. Unsure of how he got the Luxemburg Liberation medal as 6th Armd Div wasn't in Luxemburg at that time in September 44, it was in the south, in Lorraine with Patton's 3rd Army. Also note the two differant ribbons, the one on the uniform and the one on the site.

http://www.medal-medaille.com/sold/product_info.php?products_id=9710

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A link error, here it is again

 

http://www.medal-medaille.com/sold/product_info.php?products_id=9710

 

The Belgian rope by the way will be for the 2nd Armd Div. The award of the Belgian rope is made that of a unit being cited twice in Orders of the Belgian Army, which the 2nd Armd Div and the units therein was, these being, BELGIUM (I gather in September 1944) then the second time, ARDENNES (For the Battle of the Bulge).

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A link error, here it is again

 

http://www.medal-medaille.com/sold/product_info.php?products_id=9710

 

The Belgian rope by the way will be for the 2nd Armd Div. The award of the Belgian rope is made that of a unit being cited twice in Orders of the Belgian Army, which the 2nd Armd Div and the units therein was, these being, BELGIUM (I gather in September 1944) then the second time, ARDENNES (For the Battle of the Bulge).

Being a pastor I don't think he would give false witness. I also don't know if Chaplin's had free reign to move about if needed in another place.

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Being a pastor I don't think he would give false witness. I also don't know if Chaplin's had free reign to move about if needed in another place.

First this appears to be a great uniform grouping so, congrats!

 

As for being a pastor (chaplain), that title alone does not exclude someone from a false witness. I am not saying he did and would hope he didn't but, chaplains are men too and can make bad decisions or even a mistake over what decorations he was qualified for. With that said, unlike todays army chaplains, WWII chaplains had a lot of freedom to travel where they felt needed in a particular area or region. Obtaining his actual records would put any question to rest.

"There is no such thing as an expert, only students with different levels of education."

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First this appears to be a great uniform grouping so, congrats!

 

As for being a pastor (chaplain), that title alone does not exclude someone from a false witness. I am not saying he did and would hope he didn't but, chaplains are men too and can make bad decisions or even a mistake over what decorations he was qualified for. With that said, unlike todays army chaplains, WWII chaplains had a lot of freedom to travel where they felt needed in a particular area or region. Obtaining his actual records would put any question to rest.

His grandson might make copys of his papers for me.

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So what is the difference between this medal and the soldiers medal listed as a Luxembourg liberation medal?

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So what is the difference between this medal and the soldiers medal listed as a Luxembourg liberation medal?

Are you talking about this one? If so looks more like a medallion than a medal really as there's no hanger/loop for a ribbon. But it is a good question at any rate, I would like to know too, what is this? :D

liberation.1944.jpg

 

 

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I just found a medal like the one on the uniform sold not that long ago for $700.00. They can't be the same thing.

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Very nice grouping.

Sometimes back then, and even now Chaplains may be in area but the paper work doesn't show it.

Chaplain Dale was with the Combat Command B, of the 6th Division.

It does appear that APO 256 for his file has him in Clervaux, Luxembourg in April 1945.

He was also at Cherbourg, France at the Hospital around the same time.

He remained with the CCB even with the 2nd Div.

Very nice grouping.

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194511 JanAssenois (2 mi SW of Bastogne)LiegeBelgium21 JanTroine Luxembourg27 JanBoevange Luxembourg11 FebClervaux Luxembourg23 FebDasburgRhinelandGermany26 FebArzfeldRhinelandGermany10 MarVic-sur-SeilleMoselleFrance18 MarOrmingenBas-RhinFrance20 MarZweibruckenRhinelandGermany21 MarEbertsheimRhinelandGermany25 MarGross GerauHessenGermany26 MarMorfeldenHessenGermany27 MarNeu IsenbergNassauGermany28 MarHochstadtNassauGermany29 MarSteinbachHessenGermany30 MarHomburgBavariaGermany2 AprFriemenKurhessenGermany3 AprEschwegeKurhessenGermany4 AprStruthKurhessenGermany5 AprMuhlhausenThuringiaGermany9 AprLangensalzaThuringiaGermany11 AprBad SulzaThuringiaGermany12 AprOsterfeldHalle-MerseburgGermany14 AprZeitzHalle-MerseburgGermany

(The dates and places listed above are command posts for the 2nd AD.)

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Very nice grouping.

Sometimes back then, and even now Chaplains may be in area but the paper work doesn't show it.

Chaplain Dale was with the Combat Command B, of the 6th Division.

It does appear that APO 256 for his file has him in Clervaux, Luxembourg in April 1945.

He was also at Cherbourg, France at the Hospital around the same time.

He remained with the CCB even with the 2nd Div.

Very nice grouping.

Great information Bob!

"There is no such thing as an expert, only students with different levels of education."

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He was assigned to 7th Army, June 1945.

He didn't show up to the 2nd AR Div till Nov 1945.

The Super 6th web site has him with the 2nd AD from its start in the U.S. So was he with the 6th the whole time?That was the situation when by dribs and drabs a handful of officers and key enlisted men assembled at Ft. Knox, Ky., to constitute the nucleus of the 86th Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 6th Armored Division. It was a time of expansion when the War Department was dipping into established organizations to find a few highly seasoned professional soldiers to lead some semi-pro ex-National Guardsmen and Reservists who'd had perhaps a year of active duty, and depend on them to build viable units out of still-to-ripen crops of ROTC cadets, OCS graduates, a few volunteers and a mass of draftees.

Initially, the then-Capt. Albert E. Harris was acting in command of the embryo battalion and doubling as adjutant pending the arrival a few weeks later of the then-MaJ. James B. Quill. Capt. John H. Huckins was S-2 and assistant S-3; 1st Lt. Romain B. Robinson, S-4; 1st Lt. Albert B. Landis, maintenance officer; 1st Lt. Thomas P. Crawford's arrival relieved Capt. Harris of the adjutant's duties. Chaplain(1st Lt.) Kent M. Dale, who'd been a Regular Army soldier before entry into the ministry, profited by his GI experience in "empathizing" with the homesick "fillers" who were to arrive in coming months.

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