Jump to content
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt

Recommended Posts

Class leader USNS VICTORIOUS (T-AGOS-19) In service since 1991. Manned by 19 civilian mariners under the control of the Military Sealift Command (MSC) and staffed with five sponsors assigned by the U.S. Navy to the Special Missions Program

 

T-AGOS-19 USNS VICTORIOUS 001.jpg

T-AGOS-19 USNS VICTORIOUS 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USS Concord (AFS-5), was a Mars-class combat stores ship, in service with the United States Navy from 1968 to 1992. Concord became the first of five ships of its class to be transferred to Military Sealift Command. The transfer was completed in October 1992 and she was redesignated USNS Concord (T-AFS-5). Concord was stricken in August 2009 and sunk as a target in 2012.

 

USNS T AFS 5 USNS CONCORD 001.jpg

USNS T AFS 5 USNS CONCORD 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USS PAWCATUCK (AO-108) T3 Ashtabula class replenishment oiler that served in the U.S. Navy from 1946 to 1975, then transferred to the Military Sealift Command to continue in non-commissioned service with a civilian crew as United States Naval Ship USNS Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) until 1991

 

AO 108 USS PAWCATUCK 001.jpg

USNS T AO 108 USNS PAWCATUCK 001.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USS PAWCATUCK (AO-108) T3 Ashtabula class replenishment oiler that served in the U.S. Navy from 1946 to 1975, then transferred to the Military Sealift Command to continue in non-commissioned service with a civilian crew as United States Naval Ship USNS Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) until 1991

AO 108 USS PAWCATUCK 002.jpg

USNS T AO 108 USNS PAWCATUCK 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USNS BARTLETT (T-AGOR-13) Robert D. Conrad class oceanographic research ship acquired by the U.S. Navy in 1969, in service until 1993



Bartlett was placed in service, but the record of her history is not summarized by Navy (i.e. Cold War snooper - You don't have a "need to know"). The ship is mentioned in oceanographic reports and literature. For example, the ship's use in planting two acoustic sources onto the top of Cobb Seamount between 25 and 30 July 1973 for an experiment is covered in a report of the Naval Research Laboratory. In 1990 the ship spent some time in the North West Atlantic Ocean according to a data set of temperature and salinity measurements collected using CTD/XBT. Bartlett was one of two AGOR ships, the other was De Steiguer (T-AGOR 12), assigned as pool vessels for west coast Naval laboratory use according to a 1970 report. Bartlett and De Steiguer were assigned to the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office for operations


T-AGOR-13 USNS BARTLETT 001.jpg

T-AGOR-13 USNS BARTLETT 003a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USS GEORGE M. RANDALL (T-AP-113) MSTS ATLANTIC - General John Pope class troop transport in service 1944 to 1961

 

WWII, China Service, Magic Carpet, Korean War, Inchon, Hungnam, 1958 Lebanon Crisis. She was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (now the Military Sealift Command) in October 1949.

 

As an MSTS ship, General George M. Randall made scheduled runs between the West coast of the United States and the Orient until fighting erupted in Korea in the summer of 1950. She participated in the amphibious assault at Inchon which routed the North Korean Army and forced Communist evacuation of South Korea. After hordes of People's Liberation Army troops poured into Korea and trapped American forces, she served in the evacuation of Hungnam, which saved the embattled G.I.'s enabling them to return to the fight.
She moored at New York, New York, on 26 May 1951, and made four voyages from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton before returning to the Pacific. On 11 March 1951, General George M. Randall departed Yokohama, Japan, with the bodies of 52 men, the first Korean War dead to be returned to the United States, including Major General Bryant E. Moore, who had commanded the IX Corps. Armed Services honor guards were in attendance at the departure, as was an Army Band, and was heavily covered by the press. The ship arrived at San Francisco, also carrying 1500 officers and men of the 1st Marine Division being rotated home for 30 day leave. She then returned to Yokohama on 24 October.
In 1958, the General George M. Randall was the ship that carried then-Private Elvis Presley to his first assignment in Germany; in the voyage, Elvis performed in the ship's variety show as a piano player

 

General George M. Randall received the following awards for her service: China Service Medal (extended), American Campaign Medal, Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Service Medal (with Asia clasp), National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (1-Lebanon), Philippine Liberation Medal, United Nations Service Medal, Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

MSTS T AP 115 USS GENERAL GEORGE M RANDALL 001.jpg

MSTS T AP 115 USS GENERAL GEORGE M RANDALL 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USNS GENERAL D.E. AULTMAN (T-AP-156) - Military Sea Transportation Service Pacific Area 1950-1958


USS General D. E. Aultman (AP-156), a General G. O. Squier Class Transport, was maned by the US Coast Guard during WWII

Laid down. date unknown, as a Maritime Commission type (C4-S-A1) hull, under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 713) at Kaiser Shipbuilding Inc., Yard No. 3, Richmond, CA.and launched, 18 February 1945

Acquired by the US Navy and commissioned, USS General D. E. Aultman (AP-156), 20 May 1945, CAPT. Stephen P. Swicegood, USCG, in command


During World War II USS General D. E. Aultman (AP-156) transported passengers in both the Asiatic-Pacific and Europe-Africa-Middle East Theaters

Following World War II USS General E. E. Aultman was assigned to Occupation service in the Europe-Africa-Middle East Theater from 20 to 27 September 1945

Decommissioned, 15 March 1946, at Oakland, CA. and Struck from the Naval Register, 28 March 1946


Delivered to the Maritime Commission - Transfered, 30 August 1946, to the US Army Transportation Service and Commissioned, USAT General D. E. Aultman


MSTS Service

Reacquired by the US Navy, 1 March 1950 and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) and placed in service as USNS General D. E. Aultman (T-AP-156)

Placed out of service, and returned to the Maritime Administration, 4 June 1958, for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, Suisun Bay, Benecia, CA.

Struck from the Naval Register, 1 December 1959

USNS GEN D E AULTMAN 001.jpg

USNS GEN D E AULTMAN 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USNS KELLAR (T-AGS-25) Survey ship finally placed into service in 1969.

 

She was a hard luck ship with a reputation for disaster. Put out to bid for conversion in 1960, she was tied up in contract disputes and shipyard strikes for so long that the government cancelled the contracts and towed her uncompleted hull to New Orleans where she was then put out for rebidding and reconstruction. On September 9th, 1965 she was directly in the path of Hurricane Betsy while tied up at the Naval Station. She was rammed, holed and torn loose from her moorings after being struck by a crane barge and several merchantmen. Set adrift in the Mississippi, she rolled over and sank in the channel necessitating a major salvage recovery project and major remediation to repair her hull and equipment.

 

Resurrection of the Small Surveying Ship USS KELLAR (TAGS-25) https://www.navsea.navy.mil/Portals/103/Documents/SUPSALV/SalvageReports/Resurrection%20of%20the%20Surveying%20Ship%20USS%20KELLAR%20(TAGS%2025).pdf

 

Finally re-re-re-built, she was put into service in 1969 to prowl the Pacific and specifically the Korean coastline in the aftermath of the Pueblo seizure.

 

 

USNS T AGS 25 USNS KELLAR 001.jpg

USNS T AGS 25 USNS KELLAR 002.jpg

USS_Kellar_(AGS-25)_is_raised_at_New_Orleans_c1965 02.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USNS JUPITER (T-AKR-11) Cape I Class Roll-on/Roll-off Ship 1976 to 1986.

 

LIGHTNING RO/RO TASK FORCE- Diego Garcia. Was assigned to the Military Sealift Command Near Term Prepositioning Force (NTPF) in support of the equipment of the 7th Marine Amphibious Brigade.

 

The Near Term Prepositioning Force (NTPF) was established in April 1980 as an interim means of providing strategic sealift access in the Indian Ocean for the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force (now USCINCCENT). Military Sealift Command formed the NTPF with seven ships. MSC chartered the SS Illinois and SS Lipscomb Lykes and renamed these State-class Roll-on/Roll-off ships USNS Mercury and Jupiter. Along with USNS Meteor, they supported the equipment of the 7th Marine Amphibious Brigade. MSC extended charters for SS American Champion and SS American Courier with United States Lines to transport Air Force and Army ammunition, medical supplies, and other material. The tanker USNS Sealift Pacific carried fuel, and MV Patriot was chartered to carry potable water. In July 1980 the ships sailed from Wilmington, NC for Diego Garcia, under the command of MSC Office Indian Ocean, redesignated in 1983 Prepositioning Group One

 

Renamed SS Cape Intrepid, 22 November 1993 and assigned to the Maritime Administration's Ready Reserve Force, (RRF) as SS Cape Intrepid (AKR-11) one of the Military Sealift Command's (MSC) 31 Roll-on/Roll-off ships and one of the 63 ships of the Sealift Program Office, SS Cape Intrepid (AKR-11) is laid up as part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet in a layberth at Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. in ROS-5 status

USNS T AKR 11 USNS JUPITER 001.jpg

USNS T AKR 11 USNS JUPITER 002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.