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Naval Air Squadrons - Rotary 'H' Helicopter Squadrons


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Salvage Sailor

That's the one

 

Thanks to all of the contributors to this topic in the past month. Some really terrific and rarely seen Helo patches for all see and covet for their own collections.

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Salvage Sailor

HSL-42 DET 8 DIRTY DEVILS

 

LAMPS Helo detachment assigned to USS SPRUANCE (DD-963) 1997 Mediterranean Cruise

 

HSL 42 DD 963 USS SPRUANCE MED 1997 001.jpg

 

HSL 42 DD 963 USS SPRUANCE MED 1997 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

1970's LAMPS Helos Patch - Assigned to shipboard HSL squadrons the Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS) is the United States Navy's program that developed manned helicopters that assist the surface fleet in anti-submarine warfare.

 

The LAMPS project is a $3.9 billion dollar long range program that is the Navy's reaction to a deficiency in surface fleet antisubmarine warfare (ASW). The program evolved in 1970 from an urgent requirement of the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) for a program to develop a manned helicopter that would support and serve as a ship's tactical ASW air arm. The advanced sensors, processors, and display capabilities aboard the helicopter would enable the ship to extend its capabilities beyond the classic line-of-sight limitations for surface threats, and the distance limitations for acoustic detection, prosecution and attack of underwater threats.
 
To meet Under-Sea Warfare (USW) needs, the United States Navy developed the Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS). The LAMPS role initially was filled (in the early 1970s) by the installation of shipboard equipment and conversion of the Kaman SH-2 Seasprite helicopter (already in the Navy's inventory) to a LAMPS configuration. As that proved successful, the Navy planned for a Mk II version employing similar electronics but different helicopter platforms. In FY 1972, the CNO abandoned LAMPS Mk II in favor of the Mk III system.
 
LAMPS Mk III added improved electronics as well as greater range, and the Recovery, Assist, Securing, and Traversing (RAST) system for all-weather shipboard recovery. This aircraft "haul-down" system expands LAMPS aircraft recovery to a sea-state Condition 5 (winds to 33 knots, and sea wave swells to 13 feet). The S-70L, since designated SH-60B Seahawk, was United Technology Sikorsky Division's submission for the Navy's LAMPS Mk III competition. It was selected as the winner in September 1977 in preference to the Boeing Vertol's Model 237, Detail design of the Seahawk was initiated by a U.S. Navy award to Sikorsky of $2.7 million sustaining engineering contract. Concurrently, General Electric was given a $547,000 contract for further development of the T700-GE-401 advanced turboshaft engine to provide increased power and improved corrosion resistance. Additionally, a $17.9 million contract went to IBM Federal Systems to continue development of the avionics essential for the SH-60B to fulfill the LAMPS Mk III role.
 
On 28 February 1978, it was announced that the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) had authorized full scale development of the SH-60B and had awarded Sikorsky Aircraft a $109.3 million contract for the development, manufacture, and flight testing of five prototypes, plus a further airframe for ground testing. Earlier, Sikorsky had updated the original UH-60A Blackhawk mockup to SH-60B configuration, this aircraft was reviewed formally by Department of Defense officials prior to the announcement of the contract award, In July and August 1978, this mockup was used for shipboard compatibility trials (37k) on board the frigate USS OLIVER HAZARD PERRY (FFG 7), and the SPRUANCE class destroyer USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD (DD 968).
 
In mid-September 1978, the Navy responded to congressional demands and reported to the Senate Armed Services Committee that it had restructured the LAMPS project to reflect $401.2 million in cuts without adversely affecting the $3.9 billion overall program. In earlier sessions, the House recommended ending the program in favor of updating the existing LAMPS Mk I system.
 
In February 1979, the main transmission of the SH-60B completed qualification trials during which it was tested to a maximum of 3600 shaft horsepower (shp). That performance was 600 shp in excess of the Navy's mission performance specifications. On 29 March 1979, it was announced that final assembly of the first Seahawk prototype (53k) had begun, and the first flight was made on 12 December 1979. The remaining four prototypes were flown in early mid-1980, and operational evaluation began in November of that year in time to obtain the results for a Defense System Acquisition Review Council (DSARC) at the Pentagon. With DSARC's support, the Navy was able to gain congressional approval to procure 204 of these new helicopters.
 
LAMPS MK III completed OPEVAL in February 1982 and was found to be effective and suitable. FOT&E which tested the LAMPS MK III Block I Upgrade was completed in 1993 with similar results. The LAMPS Block II Upgrade entered EMD in FY93 and building on the Block I Baseline, includes major avionics modifications. The Navy plans to install this upgrade in former SH-60B, SH-60F or HH-60H airframes that have undergone "remanufacture" in the H-60 Service Life Extension Program (SLEP), the resultant aircraft to be designated a SH-60R.
 

LAMPS 001.jpg

 

LAMPS 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

HSL-42 DET 3 STINGERS LAMPS - Standing Naval Forces Atlantic (SNFL-NATO) 2000 2001 Aboard USS JOHN L HALL (FFG-32)

 

HSL 42 DET 3 STINGERS SNFL 2000 2001 USS JOHN L HALL FFG 32 001.jpg

 

HSL 42 DET 3 STINGERS SNFL 2000 2001 USS JOHN L HALL FFG 32 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

HSL-42 DET 10 LAMPS - UNITAS 2005 Aboard USS SAMUEL B ROBERTS (FFG-58)

 

Held each year since 1959, UNITAS is focused on high-tech surface, air, amphibious and under-sea naval training exercises designed to strengthen multinational maritime coalition. Operations, interoperability and hemispheric cooperation among Latin American and worldwide navies. The exercises, designed by expert naval planners from all participating naval forces, are based on realistic world scenarios requiring the participating ships to operate as a combined multi-national task force

 

HSL 42 DET 10 UNITAS 2005 USS SAMUEL B ROBERTS FFG 58 001.jpg

 

HSL 42 DET 10 UNITAS 2005 USS SAMUEL B ROBERTS FFG 58 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

HS-7 Husky Dogs Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Seven

 

7" Japanese made 1976 Bicentennial Med Cruise Loyal Order of the Line Rats

 

HS 7 Husky Dogs 1976 Med Cruise 001.jpg

 

HS 7 Husky Dogs 1976 Med Cruise 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor
On 6/22/2017 at 5:44 PM, Salvage Sailor said:

 

HSL-36 Detachment 7, LAMPS Helos - Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System

MED CRUISE 86-87 aboard USS ELMER MONTGOMERY (FF-1082)

 

 

HSL-36 LAMPLIGHTERS Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 36 In service 1975 to 1992 LAMPS helos. This came with the Det 7 patch I posted here http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/289432-naval-air-squadrons-rotary-h-helicopter-squadrons/?p=2349319

 

HSL 36 LAMPLIGHTERS 001.jpg

 

HSL 36 LAMPLIGHTERS 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor
HSL-48 VIPERS NAS MAYPORT, FL, Velcro backed


Established September 7, 1989, tail code HR, HSL-48 deploy SH-60B Seahawks on LAMPS III capable US Atlantic Fleet ships.


On May 2014, redesignated HSM-48

HSL 48 VIPERS 001.jpg

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I know that this HC-11 Gunbearers patch has already been shared. I was an ASAC and, though it was overkill for an AOE-2, I was the only qualified OS to provide safety of flight for our ship's detachment during flight ops. My friend was one of the senior aviators for our det and he gave me this pair of patches.post-9529-0-55500300-1516435688_thumb.jpg

 

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post-9529-0-01206500-1516436007_thumb.jpgMy first ship was a CG and our SH-60B (LAMPS MK III) squadron was HSL-43 Battlecats. I have their patch on one of my jackets...perhaps my blue utility (I have to dig it out). Until then, I'm sharing the LAMPS and HSL-41's patches...

 

 

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Salvage Sailor
On 12/14/2017 at 5:15 AM, hink441 said:

Here is another HM-16 patch. This was my first squadron.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpeg

 

Really nice patch Mike,

 

 

HELMINRON FIFTEEN BLACKHAWKS - (MH-15) PLANE CAPTAIN

 

Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 15 (HM-15) was established in 1987 and based at Naval Station Norfolk flying the MH-53E Sea Dragon It is staffed by both active duty and reserve personnel. The Sea Dragon, built in the 1980's, is the only U.S. helicopter powerful enough to pull equipment through the water to clear underwater minefields, a critical mission in contested Middle East waterways and the waters off North Korea. The Navy's recently completed "Helicopter Master Plan" was a plan to reduce the number of type/model/series from eight down to two (MH-60R and MH-60S). It recognized that the replacement of the MH-53 in the mine countermeasures role was dependent on technology which has not yet matured. As a result, the MH-53E continues in service as the only helicopter capable now and in the near future of effectively conducting airborne mine countermeasures.

 

Other USN Squadrons flying the MH-53E Sea Dragon are

 

HM-12 SEADRAGONS

HM-14 VANGUARDS

 

HM 15 BLACKHAWKS plane captain 001.jpg

 

HM 15 BLACKHAWKS plane captain 002.jpg

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