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DE DER FF Destroyer Escorts and Fast Frigates


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Salvage Sailor

 

DE 1048 USS SAMPLE 001.jpg

 

USS SAMPLE (DE/FF-1048) Garcia class destroyer escort/frigate in service 1968 to 1988

 

DE 1048 USS SAMPLE 002.jpg

 

USS SAMPLE (DE-1048) circa 1968 to 1975

 

DE 1048 USS SAMPLE 003.jpg

 

FF 1048 USS SAMPLE 002.jpg

 

Reclassified FF-1048 in 1975, Philippine made patch

 

FF 1048 USS SAMPLE 003.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS PILLSBURY (DE/DER-133) Edsall class destroyer escort in service 1943 to 1960

 

DE 133 USS PILLSBURY 001.jpg

 

DER-133 Radar Picket from 1954 to 1960 - "Don't let the Continental Air Defense B*stards grind you down"

 

DE 133 USS PILLSBURY 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS GARCIA (DE-1040) Garcia class leader n service 1964 to 1989, a larger version of the Bronstein class destroyer escorts. 

Plankowners patch printed on felt circa 1964 which belonged to the CPO in the photo below.

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 001.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 002.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 003.jpg

 

Plankowner CPO receiving a decoration from a Rear Admiral at the commissioning ceremony in 1964 and his three different sizes of (DE-1040) Destroyer Escort patches

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 004.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 005.jpg

 

Cut edge 1960's patch which belonged to the CPO

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 006.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 009a.jpg

 

US made (DE-1040) 6" high merrowed edge patch

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 010a.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 007a.jpg

 

US made 5" high patch

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA 008a.jpg

 

USS GARCIA (DE-1040) Garcia class leader n service 1964 to 1989, a larger version of the Bronstein class destroyer escorts. Reclassified as FF-1040 in 1975.  Hilborn Hamburger version.

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA Hilborn Hamburger 002.jpg

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA Med Cruise 1974 001.jpg

 

USS GARCIA (DE-1040) 1974 Med Cruise 7" jacket patch

 

DE 1040 USS GARCIA Med Cruise 1974 002.jpg

 

The dark blue merrowed edge (FF-1040) Swiss Tex version sold in the ships' store circa 1975

 

FF 1040 USS GARCIA Swiss Tex 001.jpg

 

FF 1040 USS GARCIA 001.jpg

 

1980's version, unknown maker

 

FF 1040 USS GARCIA 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER 001.jpg

 

USS REASONER (DE/FF-1063) Knox class in service 1970 to 1993.

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER 002.jpg

 

USS REASONER (DE-1063) Knox class in service 1970 to 1993. 5" Patch circa 1970-1975

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER 003.jpg

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER 004.jpg

 

USS REASONER (FF-1063) Knox class in service 1970 to 1993 - Asian made patch and rocker post 1975

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER 005.jpg

 

USS REASONER (DE-1063) Knox class in service 1970 to 1993.  Reasoner first deployed in 1973 to Southeast Asia and took part in Operation End Sweep (the removal of mines in Haiphong Harbor).  Hilborn Hamburger 5" patch circa 1970-1975 prior to reclassification as FF-1063

 

DE 1063 USS REASONER Hilborn Hamburger 001.jpg

 

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USS HAROLD E HOLT (FF-1074) Westpac 1978, Knox class frigate (ex-DE-1074) Homeported in Pearl Harbor in service 1971 to 1992

 

 

I was also on the USS H. E. Holt, from 85 to 89 in Pearl. Great ship, great wespac cruises.

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Salvage Sailor

USS COATES (DE-685) Rudderow class destroyer escort commissioned in 1944, served as school ship 1944-1946. Recommissioned 1951 serving with the Atlantic Fleet in Europe. She served as school ship at Key West early in 1957 and on 21 November 1957 was assigned to the 3rd Naval District as a Naval Reserve training vessel, operating from New York City. Through 1963, Coates conducted training cruises of various lengths in Long Island Sound and to ports in the West Indies and along the east coast. Her base was changed from New York to New Haven, Connecticut on 19 September 1960. Decommissioned in 1970.

 

DE 685 USS COATES 001.jpg

 

DE 685 USS COATES 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS JESSE L. BROWN (FF-1089) Knox class fast frigate, commissioned as DE-1089 in 1973.

 

 

FF 1089 USS JESSE L BROWN Hilborn Hamburger 001.jpg

 

Hilborn-Hamburger patch circa 1975 when she was converted from DE to FF

 

FF 1089 USS JESSE L BROWN Hilborn Hamburger 002.jpg

 

FF 1089 USS JESSE L BROWN Hilborn Hamburger 003.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS LIDDLE (APD-60), ex-Buckley class (DE-206), Converted to Charles Lawrence Class High-speed Transport in 1944. In service 1943 to 1967

 

Liddle embarked 141 troops on 6 December for a flanking operation in the Leyte Gulf area. After landing her troops at Ormoc without casualty on 7 December, Liddle came under attack from Japanese aircraft. Though splashing five attackers, she was hit on the bridge by a kamikaze and seriously damaged, necessitating her return to San Francisco on 16 January 1945 for repairs. While she was being refitted, a sign on her quarterdeck read: "This Ship Lost 38 Officers and Men. She is Anxious to Get Back Into Action."

 

4 battle stars for WWII service - High Speed Gator Greyhound Patch circa 1960's

 

APD 60 USS LIDDLE 001.jpg

 

APD 60 USS LIDDLE 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS BOWERS (DE-637/APD-40) Buckley Class Destroyer Escort / Charles Lawrence Class High-speed Transport in service 1944 to 1958. USS Bowers earned four battle stars for World War II service.

 

STRUCK BY A KAMIKAZE  - Bowers was then assigned to anti-submarine screen duty six miles north of Ie Shima. At dawn on 16 April 1945, the destroyer escort shot down one attacking Japanese plane. Then at 09:30, two more planes came in, flying low and fast. Bowers maneuvered radically to avoid the planes as they split to attack the escort. The first came in dead ahead, but Bowers' guns brought it down. The second passed over the ship as her port guns came to bear. Despite the heavy gunfire, the kamikaze regained altitude, turned, and came in from a 45-degree angle forward. It crashed into the warship's flying bridge, spraying high octane gasoline over the bridge and pilot house. The plane's bomb penetrated the pilot house and continued down through the ship for 20 feet before it exploded and sprayed the deck with fragments. Fire fighting parties brought the flames under control in about 45 minutes; but 37 men from the ship were killed, 11 were reported missing, and many of her 56 wounded died later.  Photo:  USS Bowers (DE-637) arriving in the Kerama Islands after being hit by a Kamikaze, 16 April 1945 (80-G-315257)

 

1280px-USS_Bowers_(DE-637)_arriving_in_the_Kerama_Islands_after_being_hit_by_a_Kamikaze,_16_April_1945_(80-G-315257).jpg

 

Bowers slowly headed for the Hagushi anchorage under her own power. With the aid of the repair ship USS Nestor, Bowers was seaworthy again by 21 April. Three days later, she sailed in a convoy for Ulithi, whence she continued on via Pearl Harbor to the California coast. She arrived at San Diego on 24 May and was ordered on to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for conversion to a Charles Lawrence-class high speed transport. The warship entered the shipyard on 15 June and was redesignated APD-40 on 25 June 1945. Her conversion was not completed until after the war's end.

 

APD 40 USS BOWERS 001.jpg

 

This is her APD-40 patch circa 1951-1958  

 

After the War - UDT Training Ship - After her conversion was completed, the new high speed transport got underway on 19 September for training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She returned to Philadelphia on 25 October for the Navy Day celebration and then steamed to Green Cove Springs, Florida, where she languished in limbo for more than a year before being decommissioned on 10 February 1947.

 

Recommissioned at Green Cove Springs on 6 February 1951, Bowers joined the Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet. After five weeks at Guantanamo Bay for training, she embarked upon a series of short training exercises for marines, underwater demolition teams(UDT's), and midshipmen. The high-speed transport operated off the east coast until March 1955, although she made a six-week cruise to the West Indies and a five-month cruise to the Mediterranean.

 

In November 1954, Bowers entered the Charleston Naval Shipyard for a three-month overhaul. Upon completion, she reported to the Commandant, 6th Naval District, at Charleston for duty as a naval reserve training ship. From March 1955 until December 1958 the warship embarked reservists for training cruises along the east coast and in the West Indies.

 

APD 40 USS BOWERS 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS THOMAS C. HART (DE-1092/FF-1092) Knox class in service 1973 to 1993. The last combat vessel to be commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard. Atlantic Fleet, Cold War, Iranian Crisis, Desert Storm

 

Thomas Charles Hart was born on 12 June 1877 in Genessee County, Mich. and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1897. He served his initial tours of sea duty in Massachusetts (Battleship No. 2) and in the steam yacht Vixen, during the Spanish-American War. In the years before the First World War, Hart filled a variety of billets: as a junior officer in battleships, torpedo boats, and submarines; as an instructor at the Naval Academy; as aide to an rump't Secretary of the Navy; and as commander of the Pacific Torpedo Flotilla. By spring 1917, Hart was commanding the cruiser Chicago and the Sub Base at New London, Conn., while also acting as Chief of Staff to the Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet.
 
During WW I, he served as commander of Submarine Divisions 2 and 5, with Bushnell (AS 2) as his flagship. One division was based at Bantry Bay, protecting sea approaches to the British Isles; the second was based at Punta Delgada in the Azores, protecting routes to that vital island. In 1918 he was appointed Director of Submarines in the Office of the CNO. Serving as its head until 1922, Hart fought doggedly to improve the lot of the submarine force. His tenacity was responsible for the Navy's acquisition of surrendered German U-boats after World War I to learn the details of the technical innovations in the enemy craft. Receiving the Distinguished Service Medal for his service as Director of Submarines, Hart spent the ensuing years of the '20's and '30's in a succession of sea and shore billets. He studied at the Army and Navy War Colleges; commanded the Atlantic Fleet Submarine Divisions, battleship Mississippi (BB-42), and Submarine Flotilla 3; served as rump't Commandant of the 3d Naval District; Inspector of Ordnance at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport RI; and Commander of the Control Force. After a tour as Superintendent of the Naval Academy, he went to sea as Commander, Cruiser Division 6, in June 1934. Reporting to the General Board after this tour of sea duty, Hart became its chairman in 1937.
 
With the temporary rank of admiral, Hart relieved Adm. Harry E. Yarnell as Commander-in-Chief, Asiatic Fleet on 25 July 1939. For the next two years, Hart prepared the small Asiatic Fleet for war with Japan. He reduced the presence of his fleet in Chinese waters and concentrated it in the Philippines to await the onslaught. He also badgered Washington for reinforcements in the way of planes and submarines. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor catapulted the United States into World War II. The Americans, with their Filipino allies, fought a delaying action in the Philippines, while a mixed American, British, Dutch, and Australian (ABDA) military structure was set up to operate from Java in an attempt to hold the Japanese at the Malay Barrier. In command of ABDA naval forces, Hart directed this defense into mid-February 1942. By then, it had become evident that, despite ABDA, the Japanese were not to be denied. Despite the obstacles, Hart persevered in the face of "discouraging surroundings and complex associations" and earned a gold star in lieu of his second DSM for unfailing judgment, sound decisions, and moral courage. Transferred to the retired list in July 1942 with the rank of Admiral, Thomas C. Hart nevertheless continued on active duty with the General Board through 1944. From February to April 1944, he was chairman of the committee which conducted the "Hart Inquiry" into the Pearl Harbor attack, a duty which took him to the length and breadth of the Pacific Ocean area.
 
On 09 February 1945, Hart retired from the Navy to fill an appointment as senator from Connecticut. He served in Congress until 3 January 1947 and did not seek reelection. Admiral Hart then returned to his family home in Sharon, Conn., and died there on 04 July 1971, at the age of 94.

Navsource.com

 

 

DE 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 001.jpg

 

USS THOMAS C. HART (DE-1092) Knox class in service 1973 to 1993. The last combat vessel to be commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard. Atlantic Fleet, Cold War, Iranian Crisis, Desert Storm

 

DE 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 003.jpg

 

Destroyer Escort (DE-1092) Commissioning Patch circa 1973 prior to redesignation as FF-1092

 

DE 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 004.jpg

 

USS THOMAS C. HART (DE-1092/FF-1092) Knox class in service 1973 to 1993. The last combat vessel to be commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard. Atlantic Fleet, Cold War, Iranian Crisis, Desert Storm

 

The shield of the USS Thomas C. Hart (DE/FF-1092) symbolizes the mission of the first ship to bear Admiral Hart's name and recreates the substance of the Hart family crest. It was designed after consultation with the members of the ship's company. The horned stag, a "hart", is found on the family shield. The fleur-de-lis is also found on the coat of arms, and the three presented here represent faith, wisdom, and valor, as well as the City of New Orleans, Louisiana, the locale in which HART's keel was laid and the majority of her construction completed. The four stars represent the rank of Admiral attained by Thomas C. Hart. The compass rose surrounding the distinctive silhouette of the FF-1078 class ocean escort represents the Navy's world control of the seas and HART's capability to respond in the nation's service whenever and wherever she is needed. The Latin words Securitas, Pax, Victoria, are translated "Security, Peace, Victory". Their use was inspired by a passage from a speech delivered by President John F. Kennedy in June 1963: "Control of the seas means security, Control of the seas means peace, Control of the seas means victory."

USS THOMAS C. HART (DE/FF-1092) VETERANS ASSOCIATION http://www.thomaschart.org/index.html

 

DE 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 002.jpg

 

1973 DE-1092 and 1975 FF-1092 Patches

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 003.jpg

 

Cut edge patch circa 1975 when she was redesignated from DE-1092 to FF-1092

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 004.jpg

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 005 Persian Excursion 1980.jpg

 

1980 Iranian Hostage Crisis "Persian Excursion" cruise patch

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 006 Persian Excursion 1980.jpg

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 007.jpg

 

1980's Cold War/Desert Storm era glue back patches

 

FF 1092 USS THOMAS C HART 008.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS DOUGLAS A. MUNRO (DE-422) Butler class escort destroyer in service 1944 to 1960

 

Douglas Albert Munro was born on 11 October 1919 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He enlisted in the United States Coast Guard in September 1939 and had achieved the rank of Signalman First Class by September 1942. On the 27th of September 1942, while leading a group of landing craft during the Guadalcanal Campaign, he participated in the evacuation of U.S. Marines from the beach at Guadalcanal's Point Cruz. Using his boat as a shield between the Japanese and the Marines, he enabled the operation to proceed successfully, but was killed by enemy gunfire. For his "extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry", Signalman First Class Munro was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

 

DE 422 USS DOUGLAS A MUNRO 001.jpg

 

DE 422 USS DOUGLAS A MUNRO 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS LANSING (DE/DER-388) Edsall class destroyer escort in service 1943 to 1965. (USCG 1952-1954). Reclassified as DER-388 and convered to a radar picket in 1955 for DEWLINE service.

 

DE 388 DER 388 USS LANSING 001.jpg

 

DE 388 DER 388 USS LANSING 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS WOODSON (DE-359) Butler class destroyer escort in service 1944 to 1962

 

DE 359 USS WOODSON 001.jpg

 

DE 359 USS WOODSON 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS MEYERKORD (DE-1058) Knox class in service 1969 to 1991. Named for Advisor LT Harold Dale Meyerkord, KIA (NC), Reclassified FF-1058 in 1975

 

DE 1058 USS MEYERKORD 003.jpg

Harold Dale Meyerkord was born 9 October 1937 at St. Louis, Mo. He graduated from Navy Officer Candidate School at Newport, R.I. on 14 June 1960 and was assigned to the heavy cruiser Los Angeles (CA 135). He reported to the U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam 13 July 1964. He was Senior Naval Adviser to the South Vietnamese 23d River Assault Group, responsible for suppressing Vietcong terror in South Vietnam’s "rice bowl"; the group probed the Delta waterways, engaging Vietcong guerrillas in operations in which Lieutenant Meyerkord distinguished himself for coolness, resourcefulness, and concern for his men. While leading his assault group into Vietcong-held territory 16 March 1965, Lieutenant Meyerkord’s patrol was ambushed. Though wounded, he steadfastly returned the enemy’s fire until hit again, this time mortally. Lieutenant Meyerkord’s heroism was recognized by posthumous award of the Navy Cross. He was also awarded the Air Medal for completing 20 low-level aerial reconnaissance missions under enemy fire.

 

DE 1058 USS MEYERKORD 001.jpg

 

DE 1058 USS MEYERKORD 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor
On 8/4/2017 at 11:10 AM, Salvage Sailor said:

Garcia class of USS O'CALLAHAN (FF-1051) In service 1968 to 1988

 

FF 1051 DE 1051 USS O'CALLAHAN Hilborn Hamburger 001.jpg

 

Hilborn Hamburger version of O'CALLAHAN circa 1975

 

FF 1051 DE 1051 USS O'CALLAHAN Hilborn Hamburger 002.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS HAVERFIELD (DE/DER-393) Edsall class in service 1943 to 1969. Atlantic fleet U Boat killer. Converted to a radar picket (DER) in 1954 to serve with CORTRON FIVE.

 

Market Time Vietnam - Bagged the largest trawler seized during Market Time operations

 

A 100-foot (30 m), steel-hulled North Vietnamese trawler C-187, attempting to infiltrate "Market Time" patrols with a large cargo of arms and ammunition for the Viet Cong, was detected by the USCGC Point League (WPB-82304) near the mouth of the Cổ Chiên River in the Mekong Delta. A chase and fire fight followed, during which the Coast Guard cutter forced the enemy trawler aground and the enemy abandoned the burning ship. After wiping out enemy shore resistance, "Market Time" units, including the Haverfield, sent volunteers on board to fight fires and salvage the captured cargo. While American and South Vietnamese teams extinguished the fires, other volunteers offloaded almost 80 tons of ammunition and arms, including mortars, recoilless rifles, machine guns, and antitank weapons. This represented the largest seizure of the "Market Time" operation and thwarted a determined attempt by the North Vietnamese to supply the Viet Cong

 

One battle star WWII, Six campaign stars Vietnam service

 

DE 393 DER 393 USS HAVERFIELD 001.jpg

 

DE 393 DER 393 USS HAVERFIELD 002.jpg

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Crosley class high speed transport conversion USS WEISS (APD-135), ex-Rudderow class DE-719 in service 1945 to 1970

 

 

My father in law served on the Weiss in 1964. I just ran across these two patches from his time onboard her.

Screenshot_13.jpg

Screenshot_14.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS DEALEY (DE1006) Class leader in service 1954 to 1972. The first post-WWII built escorts, this interim class of DE's had a short service life due to mechanical and other design problems.

 

Samuel David Dealey was born on 13 September 1906 in Dallas, Tex. and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1930. He served in USS Nevada (BB 36) before training for submarine duty. At the outbreak of WWII he was in command of S-20, and assumed command of the new USS Harder (SS 257) upon her commissioning in December of 1942. Commander Dealey guided his submarine deep into enemy waters, wreaking destruction on Japanese shipping. He won four Navy Crosses, the Silver Star, and shared in the Presidential Unit Citation awarded Harder for heroism in combat. On his fifth war patrol, for which he received the Medal of Honor, Commander Dealey pressed home a series of bold and daring attacks. Harder sank five Japanese destroyers, most with very close range "down the throat shots." On 24 August 1944, while on her sixth patrol, Harder was lost with all hands off the island of Luzon during a depth charge attack.
 
USS Dealey (DE 1006) (1954-1972) was the first ship named in Commander Dealey’s honor.

 

DE 1006 USS DEALEY 001.jpg

 

DE 1006 USS DEALEY 002.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

 

DE 1069 FF 1069 002.jpg

 

USS BAGLEY (DE/FF-1069) Knox class in service 1972 to 1991, Motto: Fleet's Finest. Cold Warrior

Gulf of Sidra "Line of Death", Operation Praying Mantis, Persian Gulf service

 

DE 1069 FF 1069 001.jpg

 

USS BAGLEY (DE-1069) Knox class in service 1972 to 1991, Motto: Fleet's Finest. Cold Warrior, Gulf of Sidra "Line of Death", Operation Praying Mantis, Persian Gulf

 

DE 1069 USS BAGLEY 001.jpg

 

1972 to 1974 DE-1069 Patch made by Hilborn Hamburger, she was redesignated as FF-1069 in 1975

 

DE 1069 USS BAGLEY 002.jpg

 

FF 1069 USS BAGLEY Hilborn Hamburger 001.jpg

 

FF 1069 003a.jpg

 

FF 1069 001.jpg

 

American post 1975 patch probably made by Swiss Tex

 

FF 1069 002.jpg

 

FF 1069 004 A Gang.jpg

 

USS BAGLEY (FF-1069) A GANG Engineering (Snipes) patch, 12" wide.  

Your local handi-man, We handle the load....when no one else can

 

FF 1069 005 A Gang.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS MARSH (DE-699) Buckley class in commissioned service 1944 to 1962, Naval Reserve training ship 1962 to 1969. Named after Ensign Benjamin R. Marsh, Jr., USNR, who was killed on board the battleship Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

 

North Africa, Southern Italy, Southern France (Dragoon), Marianas, Okinawa, Inchon, Masan, Pusan, Formosa Patrol, Yellow Sea,

Korean Blockade.

 

DE 699 USS MARSH 001.jpg

 

DE 699 USS MARSH 002.jpg

 

DE 699 USS MARSH 003.jpg

 

USS MARSH (DE-699) Embroidered version 1950's

 

DE 699 USS MARSH 004.jpg

 

DE 699 USS MARSH 005.jpg

 

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS BRIDGET (DE-1024) Dealey class destroyer escort in service 1957 to 1973, assigned to the U.S. Pacific Fleet Cruiser-Destroyer Force as a unit of Escort Squadron 3 at San Diego, Cal

 

sDE 1024 USS BRIDGET 001.jpg

 

Note the Trident and Crook of CORTRON THREE in the upper left of the patches

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 002.jpg

 

She was named for Francis Joseph Bridget, a naval aviator who served on the Commander's Staff of Patrol Wing 10 during the Japanese attack on the Philippines on 8 December 1941. He was taken prisoner with the American forces on Bataan and was killed 15 December 1944 when a Japanese prison ship in which he was embarked was sunk off Olongapo, Luzon, Philippine Islands.

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 003.jpg

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 004.jpg

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 005.jpg

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 006.jpg

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 007.jpg

 

DE 1024 USS BRIDGET 008.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS EVANS (DE-1023) Dealey class in service 1957 to 1968. This class of destroyer escorts were the first post-World War II escort ships built for the Navy and all of them were withdrawn from active service in the late 1960's and assigned to the Naval Reserve force. By 1973 all thirteen were decommissioned and scrapped and replaced by the Knox Class DE's coming into service.

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 001.jpg

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 002.jpg

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 003.jpg

 

USS EVANS (DE-1023) Dealey class in active service 1957 to 1968. EVANS was assigned to CORTRON 3, CORTDIV 31, homeport San Diego. Despite her very short service life EVANS had a very busy career in the Taiwan Straits Patrol (Quemoy Matsu) and at Yankee Station during the Vietnam War.  She received five Armed Forces Expeditionary Medals and seven Vietnam Service Medals

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 004.jpg

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 005.jpg

 

USS EVANS (DE-1023) Dealey class in active service 1957 to 1968. "Uletsu-Ya-Sti" (Bold Warrior, in Cherokee)

 

Slightly faster and larger than the WWII escort destroyers they succeeded, the Dealey class were fitted with twin-mounted 3-inch (76 mm) guns, anti-submarine (ASW) rockets, a depth charge rack and six depth charge launchers. There were later modernizations that removed the ASW rockets and the depth charges in favor of nuclear-capable anti-submarine rocket launchers and torpedo mounts which fired lighter homing torpedoes. A large SQS 23 sonar was refitted in a bow sonar dome and most of the class were also fitted with a hangar and landing pad for DASH drone helicopters to deliver MK 44 and Mk 46 torpedoes. The drone helicopters proved very unreliable and their failure contributed to the relatively short life of the class.

 

In September, 1968, she was assigned to the Naval Reserve Force (NRF) as a unit of Reserve Destroyer Squadron 27 at Seattle, Washington. She was eventually decommissioned on 3 December 1973 and was sold for scrap in 1974

 

DE 1023 USS EVANS 006.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

USS BAUER (DE-1025) Dealey class in service 1957 to 1973, Escort Squadron Three (CortRon 3) San Diego.  Named for Lieutenant Colonel Harold William Bauer, naval aviator and recipient of the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism and conspicuous courage as Commander of Marine Fighting Squadron 212 in the South Pacific between 10 May and 14 November 1942.

USS BAUER received two battle stars for Vietnam service at Yankee Station.

 

DE_1025_USS_BAUER_001.jpg

 

1960's & 1970's version of her patch

 

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DE_1025_USS_BAUER_003.jpg

 

DE_1025_USS_BAUER_004.jpg

 

DE_1025_USS_BAUER_005.jpg

 

DE_1025_USS_BAUER_006.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

USS DOWNES (DE/FF-1070) Knox class destroyer escort/fast frigate in service 1971 to 1992.  Reclassified as (FF-1070) in 1975

 

FF_1070_USS_DOWNES_Hilborn_Hamburger_001.jpg

 

Hilborn Hamburger circa 1975

 

FF_1070_USS_DOWNES_Hilborn_Hamburger_002.jpg

 

US made by Hilborn-Hamburger

 

FF_1070_USS_DOWNES_Hilborn_Hamburger_003.jpg

 

FF_1070_USS_DOWNES_Unknown_Maker_001.jpg

 

US made unknown maker, late Cold War 1990-ish

 

FF_1070_USS_DOWNES_Unknown_Maker_002.jpg

 

USS DOWNES (DE/FF-1070) Both pre and post 1975 Hilborn Hamburger versions

 

DE 1070 FF 1070 USS DOWNES 001.jpg

 

USS DOWNES (DE-1070) pre 1975 version by Hilborn Hamburger

 

DE 1070 FF 1070 USS DOWNES 002.jpg

 

DE 1070 FF 1070 USS DOWNES 003.jpg

 

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