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Salvage Sailor
HURRICANE HUNTERS
 
The first NOAA all female aircrew Hurricane Hunters wearing the latest (2015) version of the Hurricane Hunter patch in August 2018 tracking the Hawaiian hurricanes (note the Hula dancer on the dashboard)

 

 

Lieutenant Commander Rebecca Waddington (left) and Captain Kristie Twining (right) prepare to hunt some hurricanes.

 

Photo: Courtesy of NOAA

 

NOAA Hurricane Hunters 2015 version 002b.jpg

 

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Salvage Sailor

NOAA HURRICANE HUNTERS

 

Capt. Michael Silah, who now runs the NOAA Air Operations Center at MacDill Air Force Base, was a pilot for the center, helping fly a tracking plane into Hurricane Ivan, when this photo was taken in 2004. [skip O'Rourke | Times (2004)

 

NOAA Hurricane Hunters 2004 version 001.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

NOAAS MOUNT MITCHELL (S 222) was an American survey vessel in commission in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 1970 to 1995.

 

NOAAS S 222 MOUNT MITCHELL 003.jpg

 

She is the sister ship of NOAAS FAIRWEATHER (S 220) and NOAAS RAINIER (S 221), which are both still in service with NOAA. Prior to her NOAA career, she was in commission in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey as USC&GS Mount Mitchell (MSS 22) from 1968 to 1970. In 2003, she returned to service as the private research ship R/V Mt. Mitchell.

 

NOAAS S 222 MOUNT MITCHELL 004.jpg

 

1992 PERSIAN GULF - INTERGOVERNMENTAL OCEANOGRAPHIC COMMISSION - NOAAS MOUNT MITCHELL (S 222)

Post-Persian Gulf War cruise February to June 1992 - Resurveying the Persian Gulf waterways and monitoring the damage to the waters and aquatic life affected by the detonation of the iraqi oil fields by Saddams forces.

 

NOAAS S 222 MOUNT MITCHELL 003 Persian Gulf 1992.jpg

 

NOAAS S 222 MOUNT MITCHELL 004 Persian Gulf 1992.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

NOAAS RAINIER (S 221) Originally built by the USC&GS as a medium survey ship RAINIER (MSS 21) commissioned in 1968. Sister ship to the FAIRWEATHER and MOUNT MITCHELL, she was transferred to NOAA in 1970.

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 003.jpg

 

OFFICE of MARINE & AVIATION OPERATIONS - RAINIER (S 221) https://www.omao.noaa.gov/learn/marine-operations/ships/rainier

 

NOAAS S 221 Ship Rainier underway_Photo courtesy NOAA 01.jpg

 

NOAAS RAINIER (S 221) Originally built by the USC&GS as a medium survey ship RAINIER (MSS 21) commissioned in 1968.

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 001.jpg

 

S-221 First ballcap patch prior to conversion

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 002.jpg

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 004.jpg

 

Ballcap patch after conversion and addition of helicopter deck

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 005.jpg

 

NOAAS RAINIER (S 221) Originally built by the USC&GS as a medium survey ship RAINIER (MSS 21) commissioned in 1968. Homeport Newport, Oregon

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 006.jpg

 

Ballcap patch with her call sign Whiskey Tango Echo Foxtrot WTEF

 

NOAAS S 221 RAINIER 007.jpg

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NOAA Divers with the NOAAS RAINIER (S 221) 2013

 

The NOAA Diving Program is administered by the US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and is headquartered at the NOAA Diving Center in Seattle, WA. The NOAA Diving Program trains and certifies scientists, engineers and technicians to perform the variety of tasks carried out underwater to support NOAA’s mission. With more than 500 divers, NOAA has the largest complement of divers of any civilian federal agency.

 

NOAA Divers 2013 NOAAS RAINIER S 221 001.JPG

Topside

 

Graduates from the Working Diver class include - ENS Rosemary Abbitt, NOAA Ship Rainier; ENS Karen Poremba, Cameron Carter, NOS/FOB; ENS David Wang, OMAO/CPC; ENS Felicia Drummond, OMAO/MOCP; ENS Benjamin VanDine, NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson; ENS Abigail Kernan-Schloss, NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson; ENS Laura Dwyer, NOAA Ship Oregon II; ENS Hollis Johnson, NOAA Ship Pisces; ENS Jessica Senzer, NOAA Ship Ronald H Brown; Scott Stich, Snohomish County Sheriff's Dept; Alex Helphrey, City of Everett PD, Daniel Dusevoir, Snohomish County Sheriffs Dept; Michael Hillstrom, NOAA Ship Ferdinand Hassler.

 

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NOAA and USPHS Divers, 2013

 

NOAA Divers 2013 001.JPG

 

Graduates from the Divermaster class include - LT Charlene Felkey, NMS of American Samoa; Dennis Montgomery, Snohomish County Sheriffs Dept; Douglas Jones, BOEM; William Hoffman, BOEM; Allix Slagle, NOAA Ship Rainier; ENS Sean Luis, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer; LT Rachel Kotkowski, OAR/AMOL; ENS Elizabeth Chase, NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson; Max Sudnovsky, NMFS/Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center.

 

Topside
NOAA Diving Program Newsletter http://topside-ndp.blogspot.com/

 

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Salvage Sailor
On 6/30/2017 at 2:48 PM, Salvage Sailor said:

NOAAS DISCOVERER (R 102), formerly USC&GS Discoverer (OSS 02) In service 1967 to 1996

Photo: 1996 Hobart, Australia

 

NOAAS DISCOVERER (R-102) Her homeport was Seattle Washington from 1985 to 1996, she was scrapped in 2010

 

NOAAS R 102 DISCOVERER 006.jpg

 

From the Tropics to the Poles, Large 6" x 4" jacket/coverall patch

 

NOAAS R 102 DISCOVERER 007.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

NOAA WORKHORSE - TWIN OTTER - Low, Slow, and Good to Go

 

NOAA Workhorse Twin Otter Low Slow and Good to Go 001.jpg

 

OFFICE of MARINE & AVIATION OPERATIONS, De Havilland DHC-6-300 Twin Otter - NOAA Link with photos, drawings and specs

 

NOAA’s Twin Otters are among the agency's most versatile aircraft. Known for their reliability, short takeoff and landing capabilities, payload capacity and excellent external visibility, they are a perfect asset to support NOAA science in even the harshest environments.
 
With an endurance of 4-6 hours at survey speeds, the Twin Otter is more than capable of covering over 600+ nautical miles of low altitude survey in a given flight at max fuel loads. These aircraft remain very busy year round supporting airborne marine mammal, hydrological, remote sensing, air chemistry and emergency response programs. Normal crew size is two pilots with a cabin capable of seating six people with smaller science equipment installed. Known for its stability at slower speeds, the Twin Otter is capable of surveying between 90-140 knots over the ground, making it ideal for missions that require a slower aircraft for data collection.

 

NOAA Workhorse Twin Otter Low Slow and Good to Go 002.jpg

 

NOAA Workhorse Twin Otter Low Slow and Good to Go 003.jpg

 

NOAA Twin Otter - Pilots Jason Clark (left) and David Reymore stand by the aircraft prior to the flight. Photo Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki   Note the Twin Otter patch on the pilot and the observer

 

NOAA Workhorse Twin Otter Low Slow and Good to Go 005a.jpg

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THIS STRING IS MOST EXCELLENT!!!!

 

I saw a NOAA P-3 Orion in action while stationed in Alaska.

 

One thing though. There are eight uniformed services of the United States. Don't forget the U.S. Maritime Service, better known as the Merchant Marine.

 

Also, it's important to note that in WW II, there were U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey ships that supported the D-Day landing as well as all the island hoping in the Pacific.

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Salvage Sailor
On 5/14/2017 at 8:26 AM, Salvage Sailor said:

 

USC&GS RESEARCHER (OSS-03) Reflagged to NOAA on 8 October 1970
 
Researcher was built in 1968 as an "ocean survey ship" (OSS) for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey by the American Shipbuilding Company at Toledo, Ohio. The Coast and Geodetic Survey commissioned her in 1970 as USC&GS Researcher (OSS 03). When the Coast and Geodetic Survey and other United States Government agencies merged to form NOAA on 3 October 1970, Researcher became a part of the NOAA fleet as NOAAS Researcher (R 103).
 
In 1987, Researcher was renamed NOAAS Malcolm Baldrige (R 103). She was decommissioned in 1996

 

 

 

 

USC&GS RESEARCHER (OSS-03) Reflagged to NOAA on 8 October 1970

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 003.jpg

 

Untrimmed patch

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 004.jpg

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 003.jpg

 

Untrimmed & Trimmed patch (same size, different photo magnification when I took them)

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 001.jpg

 

Reverse

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 004.jpg

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER 002.jpg

 

.....and the 1970 Swiss Tex Version

 

USC&GS RESEARCHER (OSS-03) Reflagged to NOAA on 8 October 1970

 

NOAAS OSS-03 RESEARCHER Swiss Tex 001.jpg

 

Different version

 

NOAAS Researcher (R 103), was an American oceanographic research vessel in commission in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from 1970 to 1996. She had been delivered to the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1970 as USC&GS Researcher (OSS 03), but did not enter commission until after her transfer to NOAA later that year. In 1988, Researcher was renamed NOAAS Malcolm Baldrige (R 103).

 

NOAAS R 103 RESEARCHER 001.jpg

 

NOAAS R 103 RESEARCHER 002.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Salvage Sailor

NOAAS WHITING (S 329), was an American survey ship that was in commission in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from 1970 to 2003.  Previously, she had been in commission in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey from 1963 to 1970 as USC&GS Whiting (CSS 29).

 

IMG_5116.JPG

 

In 2005 the ship was transferred to Mexico, and she was commissioned in the Mexican Navy as ARM Río Tuxpan (BI-12), Mexico's first dedicated hydrographic survey ship.

 

IMG_5117.JPG

 

In July 2001, NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration asked Whiting to search for the wreck of the U.S. Navy submarine USS S-5 (SS-110), which sank 15 nautical miles (28 km) off Cape May, New Jersey, in September 1920. Whiting, which had just completed a summer in port at Norfolk, Virginia, and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts, to conduct hydrographic survey operations in New England, paused off Cape May in late July 2001 to search for the wreck. Whiting's survey department approached the project as it would any typical hydrographic survey. Information on snags – obstructions on the ocean bottom that snarl fishing nets and gear – that local recreational fishermen had reported and reports of possible locations of the wreck from divers that had visited it provided Whiting with possible targets for her search. After her crew had prepared a plan for a systematic search, Whiting moved from target cluster to target cluster, mapping the ocean bottom using sidescan sonar. After eight hours of searching, Whiting found the wreck of S-5 directly over one of the suspected targets, made a sonar image of the wreck, and recorded its exact location. Whiting then made several more passes over the wreck to acquire additional images of it at various angles before leaving the scene. NOAA donated the sonar data NOAAS Whiting gathered to the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton, Connecticut, for archiving and display.

 

USS_S-5_(S-110)_wreck_sonar_image.jpg

 

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