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USN Yard Craft - YO's YOG's YTB's YTM's YN's etc

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USN YARD AND SERVICE CRAFT of all types, If it's on This NAVSOURCE List ----> http://www.navsource.org/archives/ydidx.htm

 

Post them here.....Yard craft, Lighters, Harbor Tugs, Drydocks, Oil Barges, Berthing Barges, etc.

 

First up,Torpedo Retriever YFRT-520 NUWES KEYPORT 6" patch, In Service 1943 to 2000

Naval Undersea Warfare Center aka "Torpedo Town", now NUWC (also known as Range Tenders)

YFRT 520 NUWES KEYPORT 001.jpg

YFRT 520 NUWES KEYPORT 002.jpg

Torpedo Retriever 001.jpg

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.....and a sister Range Tender in service 1944 - Torpedo Retriever YFRT 451 also assigned to Torpedo Town, Keyport, WA from 1951 to 1993

Cut edge patch, She was unofficially known as the SPIRIT "We Do Moor"

 

 

 

SPIRIT Ball Cap Patch YFRT-451 NUWES

YFRT 451 003.jpg

YFRT 451 004.jpg

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Before there was a bridge across Pearl Harbor, this was the only way to get to Ford Island NAS & Fleet Training Group FTG, etc.

 

Water Transportation Pearl Harbor Ford Island

They would shuttle sailors from Merry Point, Iroquois Point and Fleet Landing Ford Island (where the Missouri is now tied up forward of the Arizona)

Water Transportation Pearl Harbor Ford Island 001.jpg

Water Transportation Pearl Harbor Ford Island 002.jpg

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DEER ISLAND (YAG-62) Accoustic Research Vessel - Cruising the Triangle

 

From NAVSOURCE http://www.navsource.org/archives/14/2062.htm

Built by Halter Marine, New Orleans, LA (YN 129) as the oil field supply vessel MV Deer Island (ON 503425)
Delivered to Island Boats, Inc., New Orleans, LA, 1966
Sold to Marine Acoustical Services, Inc., Miami, FL and renamed RV Paul Langevin II, 1970
Sold to Litton Systems, Inc, Biloxi, MS, name reverted to RV Deer Island, 1974
Acquired by the US Navy for service as an acoustic research ship in noise reduction trials, designated YAG-62, 15 March 1983
Placed out of service, date unknown
Struck from the Naval Register, date unknown
Transferred through the Security Assistance Program (SAP) to Mexico, 2 August 1996
Initially renamed ARM Rio Hondo (A-26)
Converted by Mexico to a survey ship, redesignated (H-08), 1999
Renamed ARM Hondo (BI-06), date unknown
Current Disposition, active in Mexican Navy as survey vessel, based at Coatzacoalcos

 

 

DEER ISLAND (YAG-62) Acquired by the US Navy for service as an acoustic research ship in noise reduction trials, designated YAG-62, 15 March 1983

 

Utilized by NSWC at the ANDROS, AUTEC & TOTO Ranges for submarine "research". Now part of the Mexican Navy as a research vessel

 

Photo of DEER ISLAND from navsource

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 001.jpg

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 002.jpg

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 003a.jpg

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MONOB ONE (YAG-61) Accoustic Research Vessel - Cruising the Triangle

 

From NAVSOURCE (Photos here) http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/46/46309.htm

Laid down by Zenith Dredge Co., Duluth, MN (YN 10), 01 December 1942
Launched, 03 April 1943
Placed in service as Water Barge, self-propelled YW-87, 11 November 1943
Allocated to the to 1st Naval District, serving at Casco Bay, ME during World War II
Converted to a Miscellaneous Unclassified Auxiliary, named and designated Monob One (IX-309) in 1969
Redesignated Yard Miscellaneous Auxiliary (YAG-61), 1 July 1970
Served as sound trials vessel, based initially at David W. Taylor Research Center, Port Everglades, FL
Later stationed at Naval Ships Research and Development Center, Carderock, MD, Acoustic Trials Detachment to support the ballistic missile submarine silencing program
Placed out of service, date unknown
Struck from the Naval Register, 2 August 1996
Sold to Mexico under terms of the Security Assistance Program, 2 August 1996
Renamed ARM Rio Suchiate (BI-05)
In service as survey ship Buque investigacion as of 2015

 

MONOB ONE (YAG-61)

We Sail the Triangle

Florida - Exuma Sound - TOTO (Tongue of the Ocean)

YAG 61 MONOB ONE 001.jpg

YAG 61 MONOB ONE 002.jpg

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The Ambush of USS KODIAK (YF-866) while supplying the Brown Water Navy in Vietnam
Retired Submariner Presented Bronze Star For Combat Action In Vietnam
Story Number: NNS090602-05Release Date: 6/2/2009 3:04:00 PM
By Kevin Copeland, Commander, Submarine Force Public Affairs
NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- A retired senior chief was formally presented the Bronze Star medal with the Combat Distinguishing Device during a ceremony at Navy Operations Support Center, Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek June 1.
Retired Senior Chief Quartermaster (Submarines) Clarence G. Cooper received the Bronze Star for his actions during the Vietnam War.
"Today's award event was about formal recognition of a naval hero's courage, determination and selfless sacrifice in preventing his ship from sinking and his men from capture or death," said retired Navy Capt. Allen Weseleskey, the event's master of ceremonies and a Navy Cross recipient.
Cooper was recognized for his heroic actions while serving as craft master of covered lighter Kodiak (YF 866) in the Republic of Vietnam Sept. 14, 1968. During combat operations, Cooper's craft was ambushed by intense fire from hidden emplacements on both sides of a narrow Mekong River channel. With little regard for personal safety, he exposed himself to the automatic weapons and rocket fire while directing his crew to fire on enemy positions.
"He was navigating his supply vessel in the Mekong Delta, delivering urgently needed supplies to naval facilities in the Vinh Long area. At a chokepoint in the river, his ship and crew of sixteen Sailors were ambushed by two superior enemy forces in a coordinated attack from both sides of the river.
"His lightly armed vessel was overwhelmed by rockets, mortars, rocket-propelled grenades and heavy automatic weapons fire. With a major number of his men wounded, he was caught in a murderous cross fire. The events of that near fatal day were saved by the rapid thinking of a craft master as he barked orders directing covering return fire while maneuvering his craft and calling for combat assistance. His efforts foiled a well-planned and executed enemy attack trap by a superior enemy force."
In the course of these events, he calmly guided his craft against the strong river currents and radioed for emergency air and waterborne support. His actions prevented the craft from going aground, which would have meant near certain destruction or capture. During medical evacuation procedures, he skillfully maneuvered Kodiak to minimize the enemy's ability to bring down the helicopter.
"I simply did what I was trained to do," said Cooper. "I immediately got the call out for help on the UHF (ultra high frequency) and HF (high frequency) radios. I managed to keep my head throughout the ordeal; however, it was the overall performance of the crew during the first minutes of battle until help arrived that was important.
"The most important part of the presentation today was the turnout of friends and shipmates. It was most meaningful to me that so many people were willing to devote their time, energy and personal expense on my behalf. I was so honored that Vice Admiral Donnelly was willing to take time out of his busy schedule to make the presentation."
Vice Adm. John J. Donnelly, commander, U.S. Submarine Force, was equally honored to be making the presentation.
"Today we honored Senior Chief Cooper, who is a great example of the commitment to service that has made our country strong. From his early days on board the [uSS] Perch [sS 313] and [uSS] Halfbeak [sS 352], to his later assignment aboard river patrol boats in Vietnam and at Submarine Squadron Six, Clarence Cooper answered his nation's call.
"And although we are here to specifically acknowledge his heroic actions on that gunboat in September of 1968, let us never forget this long history of service, and through this commitment to the Navy and his country, all of the lives that he touched and Sailors who have benefited from his leadership."
Authorized on Feb. 4, 1944, the Bronze Star is one of the most prestigious medals in the military and is awarded for heroic or meritorious achievement of service in connection with operations against an opposing armed force.
"I know that getting this recognition was the result of a two-year struggle by several people, and I am relieved and very pleased on receiving the award," said Cooper.
"I'm seventy-six years-old now, so at this point in my life the recognition is most important for my family. What is most meaningful to me is the fact that so many people were willing to devote their time, energy and personal expense on my behalf."
For more news from Commander, Submarine Force, visit www.navy.mil/local/sublant/.
James R. Walker - Citation: For extraordinary heroism on 14 September 1968 while serving with Helicopter Attack (Light) Squadron Three, Detachment Three, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Vietnam.
As a Fire Team Leader of a Light Helicopter Fire Team which was called in to support United States naval forces that were under attack on the Mekong River, Lieutenant Walker, upon arrival at the scene of the enemy ambush, immediately commenced his attacks against the entrenched hostile emplacements on both sides of the river. After diverting the intense enemy fire from the badly damages ships to himself and his fire team, he continued to press his attacks and was able to suppress much of the Viet Cong fire. With his ammunition expended, Lieutenant Walker was preparing to leave the scene of action to rearm when he was informed of the need of an immediate medical evacuation of a critically wounded crewman aboard a severely damaged lighter. Realizing that no medical evacuation aircraft could approach the crippled ship due to heavy fire, Lieutenant Walker courageously volunteered to attempt the evacuation, in the face of the withering hail of bullets, and with full knowledge that the ship had no landing capabilities for his aircraft. He hovered his aircraft over the bow of the moving ship and successfully completed the evacuation of the injured man under the most hazardous conditions. He then flew the casualty to awaiting medical attention at Vinh Long Airfield and quickly rearmed, returning to the scene of contact to press his attacks on the enemy positions. Forced to rearm once again at Vinh Long, Lieutenant Walker again returned to the ambush scene and succeeded in breaking the fiercely resisting insurgents ans suppressing all their fire. Through this tenacious and courageous attacks, he turned a well planned enemy ambush on United States naval forces into a disastrous enemy rout. Lieutenant Walker's composture under fire, outstanding professionalism, and valorous dedication were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

USS KODIAK (YF-866) YF-852 Class Self-propelled Covered Lighter - Nine Campaign Stars for Vietnam Service

 

See page 318 for more details on this action here.. https://books.google.com/books?id=g41pIek3GP4C&pg=PA319&lpg=PA319&dq=duty+honor+sacrifice+ralph+christopher+yf-866&source=bl&ots=5c7sFWhHh8&sig=mYQqHbew_fecp0MiCNluzd98NEM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj26abSoOXZAhVE-2MKHX3NA2IQ6AEIUDAK#v=onepage&q=duty%20honor%20sacrifice%20ralph%20christopher%20yf-866&f=false

YF 866 USS KODIAK 001.jpg

YF 866 USS KODIAK 002.jpg

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YFR 890 Delta Queen a refrigerated Cover Lighter, Self Propelled.

 

post-582-0-53716000-1520811646_thumb.jpg


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USNV NEW BEDFORD (IX-308) Camano class light cargo ship (originally AKL-17) converted to a torpedo test firing vessel, miscellaneous, unclassified, in service 1944 to 1994.

She was a sister ship to the USS PUEBLO and was also assigned to duty as the supply ship to the ill-fated USAF Texas Towers.

 

Built as the U.S. Army Freight and Supply Ship FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding, Whitestone New York in 1944 she served with a U.S. Coast Guard crew operating in Hawaii during WWII. Attached to the Service Force, Pacific Fleet, New Bedford (AKL-17) carried supplies between Navy bases throughout the central Pacific during the 1950's

 

After her transfer to the east coast, on 14 January 1961 the ship stood by the ill-fated Texas Tower 4 as the tower awaited orders to abandon. The order came from the Air Force at four in the afternoon of the 15th and the tower was ready to be abandoned at seven. New Bedford, struggling in the storm herself trying to reach the tower, last heard from the tower at seven-ten with an estimate from the tower's commander that they could hold out until daylight. It was the last message from the tower which was lost with all 28 hands at 7:20 pm on January 15, 1961.

 

The ship was placed out of service in 1963 and then was reclassified Miscellaneous Unclassified, (IX-308) where it was deployed to the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Keyport, Washington for torpedo testing duty and assigned service-craft status. The (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel and during this assignment she steamed over 310,000 nautical miles. She was equipped with both surface and underwater launchers and associated fire control equipment. She supported proofing, acceptance testing and research work on Keyport's ranges since that time.
During these 31 years, the New Bedford has: 1) fired over 7200 units (torpedoes, targets, etc.); 2) recovered more than 900 units; 3) planted more than 5425 range buoys; 4) retrieved over 4650 range buoys

IX 308 USNV NEW BEDFORD 001.jpg

IX 308 USNV NEW BEDFORD 002.jpg

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USNV NEW BEDFORD (IX-308) Camano class light cargo ship (originally AKL-17) converted to a torpedo test firing vessel, miscellaneous, unclassified, in service 1944 to 1994.

 

Different version, She was a sister ship to the USS PUEBLO and was also assigned to duty as the supply ship to the ill-fated USAF Texas Towers

IX 308 USNV NEW BEDFORD 003.jpg

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BAYLANDER (IX-514) the world's smallest aircraft carrier. Its helicopter deck was the same size as that of a Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate.

HELICOPTER LANDING TRAINER 1 (HLT-1) It served as a practice landing site for helicopter pilots in the United States Navy, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and National Guard.

Served in Vietnam as SKILAK (YFU-79) moving tanks, APC's, vehicles and ammo on the rivers in I Corps, 1969

 

HLT 1 IX 514 Helicopter Landing Trainer 001.jpg

HLT 1 IX 514 Helicopter Landing Trainer 002.jpg

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BAYLANDER (IX-514) the world's smallest aircraft carrier. Its helicopter deck was the same size as that of a Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate.

HELICOPTER LANDING TRAINER 1 (HLT-1) It served as a practice landing site for helicopter pilots in the United States Navy, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and National Guard.

Served in Vietnam as SKILAK (YFU-79) moving tanks, APC's, vehicles and ammo on the rivers in I Corps, 1969

 

The ship entered operations with the United States Navy in 1968 as harbor utility craft YFU-79 and served in the Vietnam War; from mid-1970 it served with the United States Army as Skilak. At the end of the war Skilak was withdrawn to Guam. In the mid-1980s it was returned to the Navy and converted to a Helicopter Landing Trainer by Bender Shipbuilding in Mobile, Alabama, entering service on 31 March 1986 at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida. By August 2006, she had achieved 100,000 accident-free helicopter landings, and by the time of her retirement had surpassed 120,000 landings. After being taken out of service and struck from the Naval Register in 2011, Baylander was sold into private hands instead of being scrapped. In 2014, it was moved to the Brooklyn Bridge Park Marina in New York City and opened as a museum ship. By mid-2016, the vessel had been relocated to the West Harlem Piers on the Hudson River.

 

Photos from navsource.org

HLT 1 IX 514 Helicopter Landing Trainer 004.jpg

YFU 79 IX 514 BAYLANDER HLT 1 001.jpg

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DEER ISLAND (YAG-62) Accoustic Research Vessel - Cruising the Triangle

 

From NAVSOURCE http://www.navsource.org/archives/14/2062.htm

Built by Halter Marine, New Orleans, LA (YN 129) as the oil field supply vessel MV Deer Island (ON 503425)
Delivered to Island Boats, Inc., New Orleans, LA, 1966
Sold to Marine Acoustical Services, Inc., Miami, FL and renamed RV Paul Langevin II, 1970
Sold to Litton Systems, Inc, Biloxi, MS, name reverted to RV Deer Island, 1974
Acquired by the US Navy for service as an acoustic research ship in noise reduction trials, designated YAG-62, 15 March 1983
Placed out of service, date unknown
Struck from the Naval Register, date unknown
Transferred through the Security Assistance Program (SAP) to Mexico, 2 August 1996
Initially renamed ARM Rio Hondo (A-26)
Converted by Mexico to a survey ship, redesignated (H-08), 1999
Renamed ARM Hondo (BI-06), date unknown
Current Disposition, active in Mexican Navy as survey vessel, based at Coatzacoalcos

 

 

Another version of DEER ISLAND (YAG-62) Utilized by NSWC at the ANDROS, AUTEC & TOTO Ranges for submarine "research"

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 004.jpg

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 005.jpg

YAG 62 DEER ISLAND 003a.jpg

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