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WWI Bi-Plane Trench Art Vase


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This just came in strangely enough with a WW2 13th A/B group. It is a nice 75mm shell vase with a WWI biplane and wings with either an "11" or just artistic design that look like an 11 on it.

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Mr.JERRY
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Very nice. Air Service trench art is hard to find and that one is well done! Thanks for posting.

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Does anyone know, what technique/tool(s)/machinery (?) was used to create those precise and deep indentations on the bottom 2/3rds of the vase?

 

I've seen that in the past of course, but always wondered how in the world it was done by hand!

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Trench art is an "art" that has been lost in the last 70 years. I don't think you'll ever see this quality of repurposed war material showing up ever again. While it may be available now from WWI and some WWII, I believe this type of artistic history will become harder to find and in the process, become more desirable as a collectible. This thing is very nice Jerry.

"There is no such thing as an expert, only students with different levels of education."
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Very nice piece of art! Is the aircraft a one-seater or a two-seater?

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<p> If the "11" actually denotes the 11th Aero Sqdn., then it should be a representation of a DH-4 which was a two seater used for a variety of missions. It was also popular with early barn-stormers after the War.  The 11th was a Day Bombardment Sqdn. according to Wikipedia. I "borrowed " these images from the Wiki website:post-2137-0-86474700-1489508437.jpgpost-2137-0-37636000-1489508476.jpg</p>

<p> </p>

<p>My guess is the winged bomb with the 11 on it was a simplified version the actual insignia--which would have been much more difficult to reproduce on the shell.</p>

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Does anyone know, what technique/tool(s)/machinery (?) was used to create those precise and deep indentations on the bottom 2/3rds of the vase?

 

I've seen that in the past of course, but always wondered how in the world it was done by hand!

Bluehawk there is a great web page that explains most of the techniques used to create trench art called 'Arts of the Great War'. I tried to post a link to the page but it wouldn't let me.

To produce the fluting the sections were marked out then the metal was annealed (heated to make the metal pliable and prevent cracking). Next a wooden wedge and hammer was used to pound out the fluting or the piece was put into a large gear to crimp the shell. I know that a cottage industry popped up around armies to use discarded war materials to produce souvenirs for the soldiers. Most trench art was made in small shops by civilians or by soldiers far behind the lines where heavy equipment was available to produce intricate pieces such as this.

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