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WW2 Army Dress Blues


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I picked this up on a road trip through Indiana about 10 years ago and just thought about posting it today. I believe its and army dress blue uniform for a enlisted man, but I've never seen one before. all the piping and the chevrons are in a buff color. The wool is like a melton and the cut of the jacket is the M1926 style. It has a tailors label inside and an Identification label dated 1942 and names to George W Burton. I would love to find out more about this piece and what type of pants and head gear would complete this jacket. I'm sorry for the poor photos.I hope everyone enjoys seeing it.

 

Thanks

Vic

 

 

 

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Late 1930s-type dress blues, and a pretty rare find for enlisted. Buff is the proper color for QM Corps. The trousers would have been lighter blue with buff stripes, and a blue cap with buff trim. Great that it had the collar brass. Really, really nice to see, thanks for posting.

 

Justin B.

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Thanks for the links, those are some nice examples. I'll have to get take on the near impossible task of finding matching trousers and cap now.

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I wish there was a way to trace the owner. Unfortunately the name is not very unique. I found about 11 George W Burtons.

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Amazing dress, I love it!
It's a 1936 model blue dress introduced in 1936 and changed only later, in 1953 officially.

it's QMD branch, pretty much rare in general due to the fact that starting from 1941 those uniforms were not mandatory enymore and used rarely for very special occasion, ONLY in US territory or at last in UK (but not the EMs).

 

I wish you to find out visor, breast cords, black garrison belt and trousers ( with small bands used for all sergeants ranks) ... I think this will be a long long quest.

As per Ar 600-36 the blue dress uniforms of Em should be used in 2 ways: blue dress or full dress

Blue dress means trousers, jacket, visor and garrison belt

Full dress means trousers, jacket, belt, visor and cords

Giancarlo

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When would blues like this have been worn? Am I right in understanding that the blue uniform at this time was an "off duty" uniform? So, social events maybe? Perhaps the Staff Sergeant was on the staff of a high ranking officer and required to be present at some kind of social events?

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When would blues like this have been worn? Am I right in understanding that the blue uniform at this time was an "off duty" uniform? So, social events maybe? Perhaps the Staff Sergeant was on the staff of a high ranking officer and required to be present at some kind of social events?

I'm imagining it was for most a private purchase item, and worn as you mentioned.

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When would blues like this have been worn? Am I right in understanding that the blue uniform at this time was an "off duty" uniform? So, social events maybe? Perhaps the Staff Sergeant was on the staff of a high ranking officer and required to be present at some kind of social events?

 

Yes, mainly for special occasion.... for example at the commemorative day at Arlington, tomb of unknow soldiers or any off duty relevant events.

 

GS

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When would blues like this have been worn? Am I right in understanding that the blue uniform at this time was an "off duty" uniform? So, social events maybe? Perhaps the Staff Sergeant was on the staff of a high ranking officer and required to be present at some kind of social events?

 

I don't think enlisted blues could be officially required for anything until the '50s. You can find a lot of photos from the late '30s at Arlington ceremonies, inaugurations and such where the marines are in dress blues and the soldiers are in OD with white shirts. The blues were for off-duty wear as the owner desired.
One exception seems to have been enlisted aides at the War Department, as seen in the wartime National Geographic. It would be interesting to know if the department coughed up some funds for those NCOs to buy it, or if they were "strongly encouraged" to get them on their own.

Justin B.

 

Edit: This photo has been posted a number of times, but here it is again:

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I don't think enlisted blues could be officially required for anything until the '50s. You can find a lot of photos from the late '30s at Arlington ceremonies, inaugurations and such where the marines are in dress blues and the soldiers are in OD with white shirts. The blues were for off-duty wear as the owner desired.
One exception seems to have been enlisted aides at the War Department, as seen in the wartime National Geographic. It would be interesting to know if the department coughed up some funds for those NCOs to buy it, or if they were "strongly encouraged" to get them on their own.

Justin B.

 

Edit: This photo has been posted a number of times, but here it is again:

post-3982-1317600677.jpg

 

Wow, interesting picture. Looks like officer's cavalry branch insignia and officers "US" too. I thought enlisted soldiers wore the disc-backed US and BOS insignia all the way back to WWI?

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Wow, interesting picture. Looks like officer's cavalry branch insignia and officers "US" too. I thought enlisted soldiers wore the disc-backed US and BOS insignia all the way back to WWI?

Justin B and me covered this in a hypothesis manner in this topic, see post #s 17 through 21.

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=132581&pid=999931&mode=threaded&start

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Giancarlo

Thanks for the complements, I will definitely be on the look out for those accessories. I appreciate the rundown of what I need , but as we all know searching is part of the fun.

Vic

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Wow, interesting picture. Looks like officer's cavalry branch insignia and officers "US" too. I thought enlisted soldiers wore the disc-backed US and BOS insignia all the way back to WWI?

 

Yeah, as Patches said it may have been an interpretation of old regulations. Jamecharles is the expert, though, he may have actual rules/regs.

 

Here is an interesting photo (from here), King George at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in June 1939. A Master Sergeant in Army blues, officer of the guard and escort officer in OD service, bugler in Army Band gray, and presidential aide in Army whites. And Marines in blues of course.

 

 

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As for the collar insignia, they were on the jacket when I purchased it. But now after seeing some of the photos that others have posted, I am not sure they are original to the jacket. I don't believe originals would be too hard to find, but the cords and waffles are going to be pretty tough to locate in the buff color.

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Vic, please don't remove the collar disks!

They are perfect on this dress.

The usage of officer's collar pins, were ONLY an habit and, honestly, was not regulated (as per reg.: the use of collar disks and all decorations as used on Class A for EM, except for the fourragere // not allowed with Blue dress uniforms ).

 

The blue dress uniforms during the war were the most misunderstanded uniforms of all period, with the most strange usage and habits I ever seen for a formal dress; so is not so strange see different ways of wearing decorations and medals.

 

I own many original photos of Blue dress uniforms used during war that show how the reg.s were ofter disattended and one for all explain what I said before: Enlisted men nearby Truman in 1945, wearing a full Blue dress with breast cords and officer's pins pinned on the large disks of the breast cords...

 

Here attached another example of EM blue dress ( PFC ) with collar disks

GS

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I see your uniform has the light blue trousers with it. How are they different from the ones that go with the marine corps dress blues? Are they a slightly different shade of blue or a different style?

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The blue dress trousers are in the same ''blue sky'' color of USMC trousers, but you must found them with a buff band of about 1 inch wide

 

GS

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I will definitely look for them, but I'm sure it may take years and a lot of luck to find them. Also is the belt black, or cordavon, and is the buckle brass or nickel?

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Garrison belt should be black with gilt buckle, for the shoes i suggest black civil shoes or at last the low quarter in black color, used by Em navy or Police in 1930s and 40s

 

(Try to contact Colonel's Cache some time he get Amazing dress stuff)

 

GS

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SgtMaddoxUSMC

Can someone explain to me what "buff" is? I have seen this term referenced in old Marine Corps regulations as well but don't know what the heck they mean!

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