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WWII Winter Navy Jacket?


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We found this while cleaning out my wife's parents basement. It was hanging next to her dad's navy fleeced lined winter deck jacket. This jacket is not marked anywhere and I could not find any other jackets like it on the web. It looks Navy but I'm not sure. It is shearling lined with a fleece wool collar. It is in great shape but is missing a couple of outside buttons. Regards

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It's a cold weather deck jacket. You will some early Navy shots of guys on submarines wearing them, plus lots of photos of Marines wearing them.

 

They are based on what is called a ranch coat in the civilian clothing business.

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Thank you. Here is a picture of the other winter deck jacket. This one is clearly marked and still has a label. The other jacket is much heavier and the inside is more like a bomber jacket. I'll have to keep looking to see it in use by navy members or marines. It must be the rarer or harder to find of the two. Regards, CC

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Thank you. Here is a picture of the other winter deck jacket. This one is clearly marked and still has a label. The other jacket is much heavier and the inside is more like a bomber jacket. I'll have to keep looking to see it in use by navy members or marines. It must be the rarer or harder to find of the two. Regards, CC

 

Korean War era: here's a Navy parka on the right, USMC on the left ( from http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/18930-usmc-korean-war-cold-weather-parka/ )

 

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Thanks Bob. Her father was in service from 1943-46. I have found a picture of the first jacket on page 190 of his 1943 dated naval officers guide. It is listed as special winter clothing, winter working uniform. Must be a hard to find jacket as I have only found one on the web and the link no longer works. Regards

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Yes, after closer examination while styled the same the jacket in the NG appears to have a shearling collar while this coat has an alpaca collar similar to his green deck jacket. I'll have to take a closer look but the leather button loops and pockets look the same. I'll take more pictures later today. Thanks, good observation.

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  • 3 years later...
Thanks Bob. Her father was in service from 1943-46. I have found a picture of the first jacket on page 190 of his 1943 dated naval officers guide. It is listed as special winter clothing, winter working uniform. Must be a hard to find jacket as I have only found one on the web and the link no longer works. Regards

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  • 3 weeks later...

It is yet another piece of foul-weather clothing worn by the USN and USCG, designated for officers, but NCO's certainly can be seen wearing them, and even a few slick-sleeve seamen.  It was not specific to submariners or aviators, though some collectors erroneously consider them "balloonist" coats like the M-69 series.  

 

The version in brown, polished cotton seems more commonly encountered vs. the version in olive-green oilskin, but I have never seen production numbers for either or even a specific nomenclature reference, so I am not sure if there was a distinction between the two, much like Hawley helmet liners made with rayon suspension and snap-in headbands vs. those with HBT suspensions.  

 

We used a few vintage examples of both coats when filming the Tom Hanks film, "GREYHOUND" and you can see both, but the brown versions standout more.  There was a superb-condition olive-green oilskin example we had with a stencil on the back for a Fletcher, which I was supposed to get in honor of my dad's service on Fletchers, but that coat just disappeared one day.  

 

As with most USN clothing from WWII, the value is limited, but examples in really nice shape are not so easy to find because they both stayed in use well after the war and could also be readily used in civilian life.  

Collecting combat-attributed and super-pristine artifacts, uniforms, helmets, and gear of the USAAF, U. S. Army, USN, USMC, Luftwaffe, Heer panzer, and Waffen SS combat troops of WWII.

 

Always buying mint-condition U. S. Army Field Jackets, Winter Combat Jackets, Arctic Field Jackets, Mountain Jackets, and Parachutist Coats and Trousers.

 

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4 hours ago, PQD said:

 

As with most USN clothing from WWII, the value is limited, but examples in really nice shape are not so easy to find because they both stayed in use well after the war and could also be readily used in civilian life.  

 

The civilian models of this were sold in the 1920's on. They were available in most department store catalogs and are called Ranch coats.

 

There are also earlier versions of these used in WWI as flight jackets.

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"A militaria show is a social event for anti-socials" - A.T. 2008


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8 minutes ago, vintageproductions said:

 

The civilian models of this were sold in the 1920's on. They were available in most department store catalogs and are called Ranch coats.

 

There are also earlier versions of these used in WWI as flight jackets.

 

I believe it was one of those civilian models that was iconically worn by James Dean in "GIANT." 

Collecting combat-attributed and super-pristine artifacts, uniforms, helmets, and gear of the USAAF, U. S. Army, USN, USMC, Luftwaffe, Heer panzer, and Waffen SS combat troops of WWII.

 

Always buying mint-condition U. S. Army Field Jackets, Winter Combat Jackets, Arctic Field Jackets, Mountain Jackets, and Parachutist Coats and Trousers.

 

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Thanks for the additional comments. My FIL was a crash boat captain in WWII until he transferred to a destroyer at wars end. He may have been issued or purchased the coat while he was at Patuxent.  He said that the wood hulled ships were having problems with the ice in the bay or river and they took them down to Pensacola to be retrofitted with (I believe) copper plating (sheathing)  on the hull. 

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1 hour ago, ccyooper said:

to be retrofitted with (I believe) copper plating

 

That makes sense because the copper sheathing also protects against marine flora and fauna growing on the hull.


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On 9/1/2020 at 8:37 PM, kammo-man said:

Any more information on these jackets?
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Of the two coats pictured, the one on the left has an oil-cloth or rubberized type exterior and I've seen them in black, or a very dark shade of green. It was a Navy contract item and was intended for use aboard ships, where it can be seen in vintage photos, used as a waterproof foul weather garment. It also appears at Normandy, in use by Navy beach battalions. The jacket on the right has a fabric exterior, brown in color and is not water proof. It is a commercial item that was procured by the Navy. Both were sheep skin lined and featured leather re-enforcements around the pockets. The commercial jackets can be seen in use by US Marines in Iceland in 1940. They are also listed in the BuAero Class 37 aviation clothing catalog from 1944, where it mentions their commercial origins and states they are intended for use by ground and deck personnel:

 

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32 minutes ago, pararaftanr2 said:

US Marines in Iceland, 1940, with the fabric shell jackets:

 

USMC-C-Iceland-1.jpg

USMC-C-Iceland-41a.jpg

 I have seen a couple of the USMC versions that had USMC contract labels intact (that's the only way I know for sure they were USMC) and also in a light greenish color with pale-colored collars.  I have no idea if all the USMC versions were contracted for production and I am not surprised that both collar and shell colorings varied for such a specialized item used by men few in number.  

Collecting combat-attributed and super-pristine artifacts, uniforms, helmets, and gear of the USAAF, U. S. Army, USN, USMC, Luftwaffe, Heer panzer, and Waffen SS combat troops of WWII.

 

Always buying mint-condition U. S. Army Field Jackets, Winter Combat Jackets, Arctic Field Jackets, Mountain Jackets, and Parachutist Coats and Trousers.

 

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43 minutes ago, pararaftanr2 said:

US Marines in Iceland, 1940, with the fabric shell jackets:

 

USMC-C-Iceland-1.jpg

This photo is very interesting and the date highly suspected to be incorrect.  The Marine (?) far left is wearing the U. S. Army Field Jacket, which would have been infinitely few in number in 1940 and not subject to USMC issue, as the USA was still far below its needs in receiving this item.  If this man is indeed a Marine and a Field Jacket somehow found its way into the USMC, this version would also had to have had epaulets added, as the PQD Spec. 20A Field Jacket was the first version made with epaulets and it did not appear until the early summer of 1941.  Some officers of the USA did add epaulets to the early Field Jackets without epaulets (Spec. 20 and the earlier "Windbreaker'), but, unfortunately, the photo quality and the man's positioning both fail to reveal other telltale signs of the Field Jacket being a modified Spec. 20 or the earlier pre-spec. 20 "Windbreaker."  If this photo has an indisputable date stamp, then the Field Jacket has to be both very rare in its appearance with the USMC and for having also been modified.  

Collecting combat-attributed and super-pristine artifacts, uniforms, helmets, and gear of the USAAF, U. S. Army, USN, USMC, Luftwaffe, Heer panzer, and Waffen SS combat troops of WWII.

 

Always buying mint-condition U. S. Army Field Jackets, Winter Combat Jackets, Arctic Field Jackets, Mountain Jackets, and Parachutist Coats and Trousers.

 

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15 minutes ago, PQD said:

This photo is very interesting and the date highly suspected to be incorrect.  The Marine (?) far left is wearing the U. S. Army Field Jacket, which would have been infinitely few in number in 1940 and not subject to USMC issue, as the USA was still far below its needs in receiving this item.  If this man is indeed a Marine and a Field Jacket somehow found its way into the USMC, this version would also had to have had epaulets added, as the PQD Spec. 20A Field Jacket was the first version made with epaulets and it did not appear until the early summer of 1941.  Some officers of the USA did add epaulets to the early Field Jackets without epaulets (Spec. 20 and the earlier "Windbreaker'), but, unfortunately, the photo quality and the man's positioning both fail to reveal other telltale signs of the Field Jacket being a modified Spec. 20 or the earlier pre-spec. 20 "Windbreaker."  If this photo has an indisputable date stamp, then the Field Jacket has to be both very rare in its appearance with the USMC and for having also been modified.  

The original caption states: "These Marines in fur-collared cold-weather gear stand on the chilly "Main Street" of their wooden-fronted and coke-and-coal-stove-heated Nissen hut encampment in Iceland.
Department of Defense Photo (USMC) 185054"

I was incorrect in stating 1940, as they did not arrive in Iceland until July 1941. Sorry for the confusion.

 

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18 minutes ago, pararaftanr2 said:

The original caption states: "These Marines in fur-collared cold-weather gear stand on the chilly "Main Street" of their wooden-fronted and coke-and-coal-stove-heated Nissen hut encampment in Iceland.
Department of Defense Photo (USMC) 185054"

I was incorrect in stating 1940, as they did not arrive in Iceland until July 1941. Sorry for the confusion.

 

 

That makes sense, and thank you for the correction.  I am uncertain when the USMC first received Field Jackets, but Iceland Detachment could have gotten some in 1941, which would make the jacket depicted a Spec. 20A; however, I am of the belief that the first issue to the USMC was not until later in 1942.  It is also possible this jacket seen in the photo was obtained from USA personnel that arrived in Iceland beginning in Aug. 1941.

Collecting combat-attributed and super-pristine artifacts, uniforms, helmets, and gear of the USAAF, U. S. Army, USN, USMC, Luftwaffe, Heer panzer, and Waffen SS combat troops of WWII.

 

Always buying mint-condition U. S. Army Field Jackets, Winter Combat Jackets, Arctic Field Jackets, Mountain Jackets, and Parachutist Coats and Trousers.

 

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