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M1 Carbine - Did Marine Riflemen use this weapon in the Pacific?


stealthytyler
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Salvage Sailor

I was thinking transportation or support unit (clearing a cave or souvenir hunting) - no ammo belts, bib coveralls, goggles, clean uniforms

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Interesting photo you posted Dave - Note the two (2) buttstock pouches on the carbine, one left side, one right side.

 

The pouches on the butt stock of the carbines were used there commonly, however I had read that those mag pouches were not designed for that. They were to go on a belt, but many GIs stuck them on the butt stock like that for ease of accessibility.

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Salvage Sailor

 

The pouches on the butt stock of the carbines were used there commonly, however I had read that those mag pouches were not designed for that. They were to go on a belt, but many GIs stuck them on the butt stock like that for ease of accessibility.

 

Right, It's a .30 carbine magazine pouch for the belt that was commonly placed on a .30 carbine butt stock. What is unusual in the photo is having two (2) on the carbine

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I have the counts for the total number of rifles for the Marines from the Archives. They had over 300,000 M1 Carbines. I forget the exact number and I would have to go back and look. But I think it was around 330k range.

 

They were very common, and for instance the total count of say Iwo Jima, there were more M1 Carbines than there were Garands on the island.

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<p>Shotgun in the background; it looks like they had those too.</p>

 

 

I went back and looked at the counts. But for example this pic was on Iwo. For the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Divisions on Iwo they had a total of 624 shotguns. The total shotguns they show that they got during the war was 14,933,

 

I did double check the carbines as well while I was in there. The total Carbines they received during the war was 333,760. This count was done at the ending of 1945, so it should be pretty accurate.

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Infantry Grunt

 

 

I went back and looked at the counts. But for example this pic was on Iwo. For the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Divisions on Iwo they had a total of 624 shotguns. The total shotguns they show that they got during the war was 14,933,

 

I did double check the carbines as well while I was in there. The total Carbines they received during the war was 333,760. This count was done at the ending of 1945, so it should be pretty accurate.

 

Hmm that's very interesting... What book did you find this in?

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<p>Shotgun in the background; it looks like they had those too.</p>

 

 

Ronny

 

Thanks for posting the picture.I was thinking of the very one showing this Marine with grenade launcher on the carbine

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Hmm that's very interesting... What book did you find this in?

 

 

We have been hitting the National Archives pulling all the weapons documents. They came from counts in the Commandant files.

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pararaftanr2

Blacksmith,

To answer one of your questions from your Post #25, those are the bottom half of the Navy issue gas-proof suit. Manufactured in white cotton fabric, with navy-blue plastic buttons, they could be over-dyed for use in the field and treated with CC-2 chloramine. Those issued to beach battalion and small boat crews in Normandy were dyed a light shade of green, for example. The top half was a hooded, parka-like garment. The suits are most often incorrectly identified as Army rain suits.

Regards, Paul

 

 

post-9787-0-11411700-1483913906.jpg

post-9787-0-57960300-1483914061.jpg

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my friend, also former shooting team member was a marine raider.

 

he spoke very little about the war.

 

i remember when he showed me his carbine, he stated it was good only for clearing caves.

 

we went from the canal to the end, and then Korea, god bless him, may he rest in peace

 

 

semper fi

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Very insightful, thanks Paul.

 

Blacksmith,

To answer one of your questions from your Post #25, those are the bottom half of the Navy issue gas-proof suit. Manufactured in white cotton fabric, with navy-blue plastic buttons, they could be over-dyed for use in the field and treated with CC-2 chloramine. Those issued to beach battalion and small boat crews in Normandy were dyed a light shade of green, for example. The top half was a hooded, parka-like garment. The suits are most often incorrectly identified as Army rain suits.

Regards, Paul

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

<p>Shotgun in the background; it looks like they had those too.</p>

 

 

I see this Marine has a rifle grenade launcher strapped to his pack.I have seen the picture for years and just noticed it.

 

Im also pretty sure he is the same Marine whos picture I posted(above) with the carbine.When blown up the face looks the same.I may try to lighten this picture but it looks like both have the same facial features and the moustache too.

 

 

post-153625-0-95870600-1483903799.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

From what I had read, and I am in no way an expert voice on it. But the M1 Carbine was designed and built mainly for non-combatants. The Garand being the "Battle Rifle". I also read that non combatants were offered their choice of the M1911, or the M1 Carbine. That is not to say that some combatants didn't carry a carbine due to it being much less weight to tote around. Im sure they were because as mentioned above there are many pictures of Marines, and other infantry carrying the M1 Carbine.

 

The carbine was designed to replace the 1911, not for non combatants. It was thought the carbine would be a better weapon for tank crews, mortarmen, MG crews and officers who were issued pistols.

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Trying to find out how common it was for a Marine Rifleman to have used an M1 Carbine in the Pacific during WWII (Guadalcanal, Peleliu, Okinawa, etc.) Would they not have been issued an M1 Garand exclusively? Thanks

IIRC assistant BAR men carried carbines at one time

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Another reason for development and issue of the carbine was the ability to apply more firepower (say to gain fire superiority in a tactical situation) than was possible with the .45. It is a tribute to the carbine that it was used right up to, and in Vietnam. Definitely agree with previous comments that it is a great little weapon to shoot!

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I don't have the statistic handy but I believe the M1 Carbine was the firearm produced in the greatest number during WWII, (at least by the US), significantly more carbines were made (and issued) than M1 Garand rifles.

 

And I think it's a misinterpretation to say it was intended for "non combat" troops. More accurately, it was intended for those whose duties did not require them to carry an M1 Rifle. As others have said, tank crews, artillerymen, scouts, assistant machine gunners, and others who fought on the front lines used carbines (as well as the M3 "Grease gun.")

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