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Help with Grenade Opinion


cerick1450
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Hello

 

How does this grenade look. Sorry for the poor picture, but it is all I could get right now. The body appears to have a R B , or B B casting letters.

Thank you for the help.

post-13198-0-76474100-1483210601_thumb.jpg

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Garandomatic

No kidding. I don't collect grenades because of the price tag, but that one's got a local connection to me, and it looks about as perfect as it gets. If you get it, pm me and I'll send a photo from the local book that shows them packing them At the foundry.

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Persian Gulf Command

What was the reason or pourpose for the "10" stamped in the bottom of the grenade, apparently after the casting?

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Dirt Detective

No kidding. I don't collect grenades because of the price tag, but that one's got a local connection to me, and it looks about as perfect as it gets. If you get it, pm me and I'll send a photo from the local book that shows them packing them At the foundry.

 

Would love to see that photo posted here...

 

Rgds, Mike

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Garandomatic

I guess bodies still turn up when they disturb soil around the plant, but they're a tad rare today. Used to be lots of them back in the 70s. I'd sure love to hang an example. Somewhere on here i made a post about a strange BB marked aluminum grenade body that I have. Nobody knows what the deal is with that one.

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Based on what I have read on line, it appears that the Fuze Marking EK, Indicates it was made by Eastman Kodak..

Also, I have realized that this fuse has a "Red Washer between the fuze and the body of the grenade. It also seems that this is not commonly found.

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Does anyone have a link, or can comment on "Red Washer" Use during WW2? I have been able to find several brief references, but not much information. Just curious.

Thank you

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The M10A3 is pictured and described in the both posts. Look at the line drawings and note the break in the cap. It's the same as yours. The caps for the real deals contain a beefier charge, like Mercury fulminate and lead azide. Don't need as much force for a practice grenade.

 

This post has good info,

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/263402-detailed-grenade-fuze-info/

 

This post has info and pics of the M10A3 fuze in a practice grenade.

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/262043-wwii-grenade-question/

 

Smitty

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Dirt Detective

Hi Smitty,

Thanks for all the info. What do you mean when you say " note the break in the cap" do you mean the crimp? Just tryin to learn

 

Rgds, Mike

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Mike,

Yes, that's what I meant. I forget that not everyone understands EOD terms. The term "break" is used to note any junctions in the major diameter of ordnance items. On a 2.75in rocket, the point where the warhead joins to the motor would be the "break". We use measurements from the break on different items to make positive ID's of ordnance. There are multiple warhead types, but the measurement helps ID. This is important for disposal operations because the N.E.W (Net Explosive Weight) of the items being destroyed may exceed the limits of the disposal area. Sorry to ramble. LOL!!

 

Smitty

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Dirt Detective

Hi Smitty,

Ok..I'm confused, this must explain why i became a fireman instead of an EOD guy. :) The fuze in Cerick's post looks like a normal frag fuze with a detonator to me..from what I have read, the practice grenade in WWII used the M10, M10A2, M10A3 and later the M205, M205A1 & A2.

 

M10A2 and M10A3's were used on fragmentation grenades

 

It says in 2-45 the M205 was designed specifically for the M21

 

Could you please circle the part in the fuze pic that shows this is a practice fuze?

 

Thanks for helping clear this up. Mike

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