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AEF Vehicle insignia

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Photo No. 26: This heavy truck, mired in the mud on the first day of the Argonne offensive, has been marked with the insignia of the 92nd Infantry Division. The right hand truck also bears an unknown marking comprised of the letter “C” on a circular white background.

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Photo No. 27: The emblem painted on the door of this motor car indicates that the vehicle was the property of an unknown Engineer Regiment.

 

Photo courtesy of the National WW I Museum

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Photo No. 28: A similar U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, turreted castle has been painted onto the cab of this Mack Dump Truck from the 23rd Engineer Regiment (road construction).

 

Photo courtesy of the Veterans History Project

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Photo No. 29: Another 23rd Engineer Regiment (road construction) vehicle, this time a Mack Sprinkler Truck, stenciled with the Corps of Engineer’s castle.

 

Photo courtesy of the Veterans History Project

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Photo No. 30: These 755 gallon water trucks have all been marked with the “WS” logo of the AEF Water Service whose nucleus was the 26th Engineer Regiment (water supply). The insert of the “WS” emblem was borrowed from the spine of a 26th Engineer Regiment history.

 

Photo courtesy of the National WW I Museum

Inset courtesy of the Brennan Gauthier collection

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Photo No. 31: Misc. motorcycle and sidecar markings. From left to right, 30th Engineer Regiment, Medical Department or possibly the American Red Cross and the Motor Dispatch Service.

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Photo No. 32: The ownership of this Harley Davidson motorcycle & sidecar is made clear to all by the Signal Corps logo painted onto the side of the gas tank and by the stenciled legend, “Pigeon Section 1675”.

 

Photo courtesy of the Rogier Van de Hoeff collection

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Photo No. 33: Left, Signal Corps emblem on the side of a trailer housing a wireless radio circa 1918. Right, a sidecar painted with a red cross on a white field, indicating its affiliation with the American Red Cross, the U.S. Army Medical Department or possibly an AEF Base Hospital.

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Photo No. 34: All U.S. Army & AEF motorized and horse drawn ambulances were identified as such by being marked with a caduceus and the internationally recognized symbol of a red cross on a white background. Some AEF ambulances were also adorned with division insignia and what are presumed to be individual ambulance company emblems on their sides.

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Photo No. 35: These ambulances on the move have been reserved exclusively for the transport of mustard gas patients. Apparently by mid-1918 AEF casualties caused by mustard gas had increased to the point that designated ambulances were outfitted with special equipment, such as anti-gas clothing for the driver and attendant and oxygen tanks for the patients carried within.

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Photo No. 38: The occupants of this AEF heavy trucks bearing an unknown insignia all sport III Army Corps shoulder insignia. Can anyone ID the vehicle insignia?

 

Photo courtesy of the John Adams-Graf collection

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Photo No. 39: Another unidentified AEF truck insignia comprised of clothed rabbits jumping over the letter ‘M’. Can anybody ID this vehicle insignia?

 

Photo courtesy of the John Adams-Graf collection

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Photo No. 40: And yet another unidentified AEF truck insignia. This example appears to be made up of either letters or numerals or a combination of the two. Can anybody ID this vehicle insignia?

 

Photo courtesy of the John Adam-Graf collection

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Photo No. 41: The insignia within the triangular shape stenciled on this AEF heavy truck bears a close resemblance to the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps insignia. Can anybody confirm that this emblem represents the Quartermaster Corps or otherwise ID this vehicle insignia?

 

Photo courtesy of the John Adams-Graf collection

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Photo No. 42: Another unknown insignia on a shield shaped background. This design painted on a Dodge touring car, is partially visible behind the third soldier from the left. Can anybody ID this vehicle insignia?

 

Photo courtesy of the John Adams-Graf collection

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Photo No. 43: Another unknown AEF motor car insignia. It is either the stylized letter ‘S’ or the numeral ‘8’, which could possibly signify the VIII Army Corps? Can anybody ID this vehicle insignia?

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Photo No. 44: This final truck insignia is said to represent Motor Truck Company No. 302. If you look closely you’ll notice that the squiggle in the lower left hand corner is shaped like the number ‘302’.

 

I suspect, but cannot confirm that many individual AEF truck companies may have unofficially adopted insignia that was exclusive only to their company. It’s also possible that some of these unusual vehicle markings may have been made into shoulder patches that were never officially approved by GHQ.

 

Photo courtesy of Bay State Militaria.com

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Some vehicles used small insignia painted metal plates. Here's an example of one for the Reserve Mallet that was removed from a truck used by Groupe Robinson.

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Even the toy industry got into the military vehicle insignia business. This is a pressed steel army truck manufactured in the 1920s by the Dayton Toy and Specialty Co. under the brand name "Sonny Boy". They made two different military vehicles and both have a 79th Division insignia on them. I've never been able to find any research as to why they chose the 79th. Many soldiers from Eastern Pennsylvania served in the Division. Maybe there's a connection there. Who knows?

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Selling Quality 20th Century Militaria


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Very impressive study of the vehicles and insignia that they used.You did a great job putting this together,thank you for posting this.


High Flight

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth

And danced the skies on laughter-silver wings;

Sunward I've climbed and joined the tumbling mirth

Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things

You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung

High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there

I've chased the shouting wind along and flung

My eager craft through footless halls of air.

Up, up the long delirious, burning blue

I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace,

where never lark, or even eagle flew;

and while, with silent, lifting mind I've trod

The high untrespassed sanctity of space,

Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

 

John Gillespie Magee, Jr.

June 9, 1922 – December 11, 1941

 

 

 

" And each man stands with his face in the light of his own drawn sword. Ready to do what a hero can." - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

 

Don't let the B@stards wear you down -"Vinegar" Joe Stillwell

 

 

Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world.Unreasonable

people attempt to adapt the world to themselves.All progress,

therefore, depends on unreasonable people.

George Bernard Shaw

 

 

" Don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining" , Fletcher,from the movie "The outlaw Josey Wales"

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Excellent post! Thanks for taking the time to do this interesting research and posting it.

BKW

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